Things That Matter

‘Game Of Thrones’ Actress Protests George Floyd’s Death

The Queen in the North says no justice, no peace!

“Game of Thrones” actress Sophie Turner proved herself worthy of a fight over the weekend when she aligned herself with the Black Lives Matter movement and delivered a powerful message about George Floyd’s death. In a series of pictures shared to her Instagram page, the actress showed that she and her husband had been active in the Black Lives Matter protests that took place in Los Angeles.

In a post to her Instagram, Turner shared photos of the protests with a powerful message.

View this post on Instagram

No justice, no peace #BlackLivesMatter

A post shared by Sophie Turner (@sophiet) on

“No justice, no peace,” she wrote in an Instagram caption featuring the images of protestors lying on the ground and kneeling as part of a demonstration against George Floyd’s death.

When a fan asked Turner if the protests really needed to continue the actress was blunt with her reply.

View image on Twitter
Instagram.com

In response to Turner’s post, a fan asked whether protests were still necessary considering all four officers in George Floyd‘s death have been arrested and charged. “So there justice sooooo can we have peace now?” the user asked.

In response, Turner said “this isn’t just about those 4 cops, this is about Breonna Taylor, this is about Trayvon Martin, this is about Eric Garner, this is about the systemic racism that black people have faced for hundreds and hundreds of years. This is about changing the system. Justice will be done when society reflects our believes that we are all equal. Until then there should be no peace.”

It’s not the first time the Queen in the North fought for justice and the Black Lives Matter movement.

The Instagram star took to her Instagram last week after riots flared in response to the death of George Floyd and wrote “My heart is heavy. I stand in solidarity with those speaking out against racism and fighting for justice and equality,” she wrote. “Silence is not an option.”

Along with her reply, Turner asked fans to educate themselves on the movement by listing activists to follow which included Colin Kaepernick and Indya Moore. “While my voice is not one that needs to be heard, I want to highlight some of those we should listen to,” Turner explained.

Here’s a look at a few organizations to help like Sophie Turner is.

Homeless Black Trans Woman Fund

The Homeless Black Trans Woman Fund provides support and funds to Black trans women in Atlanta who are sex workers and homeless. The fund works to give women cell phones, housing, food, and other necessities. According to the fund’s founder, Jesse Pratt López, “Atlanta has almost no resources for Transgender women, so I took matters into my own hands.”

Donate to the fund here.

NAACP Legal Defense Fund

https://www.instagram.com/p/CBJraXYBC1d/

Donate to the fund here.

Black Visions Collective

Donate to the fund here.

The Loveland Foundation

This is one fund that we feel particularly strong about because of its efforts to support the mental health and well being of women of color.

Donate to the fund here.

The Okra Project

The Okra Project is a collective bringing healthy and home-cooked meals to Black trans people across the country. The project organizes and pays for Black trans chefs to go into the homes of other Black transgender people and cook them a free meal.

Donate to the fund here.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Twitter’s AIs Prefer Ted Cruz With Boobs And White Skin Over Black

Things That Matter

Twitter’s AIs Prefer Ted Cruz With Boobs And White Skin Over Black

Ever notice how on some social platforms like Twitter or Instagram that you yourself are mysteriously unable to crop your display images on your own? That’s because Twitter prefers to let their algorithms make the decision. Over the weekend users on Twitter discovered the surprising dangers of letting algorithms crop your own images.

Education tech researcher Colin Madland drew attention to the issue while speaking out about how the video-calling program Zoom, often crops the head out of his black person coworker while on calls.

It didn’t take long for Madland and other users to discover that Twitter’s AIs use discriminatory equations to prioritize certain faces as well. In short, the social platform’s AIs prefer white faces over Black ones.

In response to the discoveries, a Twitter spokesperson acknowledged that the company was looking into the issue “Our team did test for bias before shipping the model and did not find evidence of racial or gender bias in our testing. But it’s clear from these examples that we’ve got more analysis to do. We’re looking into this and will continue to share what we learn and what actions we take,” they stated.

Of course, Madland’s discovery is nothing new. In 2019, test results from the National Institute of Standards and Technology revealed that some of the strongest algorithms online were much more likely to confuse the faces of Black women than those of white women, or Black or white men. “The NIST test challenged algorithms to verify that two photos showed the same face, similar to how a border agent would check passports,” Wired points out. “At sensitivity settings where Idemia’s algorithms falsely matched different white women’s faces at a rate of one in 10,000, it falsely matched black women’s faces about once in 1,000—10 times more frequently. A one in 10,000 false match rate is often used to evaluate facial recognition systems.”

Still, it didn’t take long for users on the platform to ask what other physical preferences Twitter has.

Turns out the AIs prefer Ted Cruz with large anime breasts over a normal-looking Ted Cruz.

(To better understand this Tweet, click the link above)

The user who tested the image of Cruz, found that Twitter’s algorithm on the back end selected what part of the picture it would showcase in the preview and ultimately chose both images of Cruz with a large anime chest.

It’s nothing new that Twitter has its massive problems.

For a platform that so controls and oversees so much of what we consume and how we now operate, it’s scary to know how Twitter chooses to display people with different skin tones. The round of jokes and Twitter experiments by users has only revived concerns on how “learning” computer algorithms fuel real-world biases like racism and sexism.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Study Says 95% Of Women Don’t Regret Having Abortions

Fierce

Study Says 95% Of Women Don’t Regret Having Abortions

Mario Tama / Getty Images

Across the country, many states require a woman seeking an abortion to undergo waiting periods and counseling. The assumption behind the regulation is that ultimately women looking to have an abortion will regret their decision in the long term. A study published this past January in Social Science & Medicine, however, found that over 95 percent of the women who took place in a UC San Francisco study revealed that they had no regrets about their decision five years later.

The finding not only completely debunks the notion that most women who have abortions suffer from regret and guilt over their decision even if the decision was a hard one to make.

Out of interest, we researched online forums like Reddit to see what women had to say about their decision to terminate their pregnancies.

“I’ve had… more than one abortion. It was never a thought. Immediately after finding out I was pregnant, I bee-lined to the clinic. BEST decision I have ever made. No regrets at ALL! I’ve been called names, “baby killer”, etc. but I laugh at these people. I’m open about it, not that I had the choice because my ex SIL went around town telling everyone (thanks, stupid fuckhead ex-husband). The people that give me a hard time about it are parents themselves and are probably just bitter and jealous, anyways.” – Reddit user

“I had one when I was 21 (almost 39 now). Not once, for a single second, have I ever regretted that decision. I was dating a complete shitshow of an excuse for a human being (a heroin dealer, which I didn’t find out until later) who was abusive and promiscuous, and I knew the second I found out I was pregnant that I wasn’t keeping it. In addition to already knowing I was childfree for life, there was no way would I have brought an unwanted child into that kind of situation. So my very supportive mom took me to the PP appointment, where the staff was wonderful and only gave me a brief counseling session in which they made sure I was making the right decision for myself. The rest was pretty cloudy for me, because they gave me a Valium beforehand, but I do remember that when they did the ultrasound, they couldn’t find a heartbeat but still wanted to do the procedure because the pregnancy test was positive. After that, mom drove me back home, and the guy I was dating didn’t even seem to care about much of anything. We broke up just over a year later, and I heard through the grapevine that he was in jail for grand theft auto a few months after that. Today, I’m super well-adjusted and in a happy relationship with a really awesome guy who is as childfree as I am!” –Shanashy

“I’ve told people when it has come up in conversation.”

“I had an abortion recently. Mid-20s, stable relationship and good income. IUD failure. I’ve told people when it has come up in conversation. We don’t want children so we won’t have one. No regrets here.” –meinkampfyjumper

“When I was 17, I had an abortion. I’m 30, and have never once regretted it, nor ever felt guilty either. I knew, even after telling my parents and grandma about it I was certain. The guy was a nice guy, we talked about keeping it (because he was almost aborted himself when his mom got pregnant with him), but in the end he was already in the process of joining the Army. I would have been alone, a senior in high school, with my family’s help. That was not how i wanted it to happen, if at all, amd neither did he. He helped pay for half the procedure and when he took me home, my mom was supportive. I was scared yes, but relieved. She was amazing (still is). My grandma called me cold hearted for not thinking of the baby, when in my head(and heart), thats all I was doing. I learned later that my mom, grandma and great grandma had all had an abortion, but still had kids later. And its been great for them. Im on my second IUD now and have no plans for kids. Every so often I would get back in contact with the guy, and every time he brings up the kid we could have had (I was the one that got away). I would have had a 12 year old by now. And I breath a sigh of releif every time that I dont. I can barely take care of myself, hanging on by a thread and know I’m happier and better off. To some it may be cold, but I did the best thing for me, and made sure it never happened again, but also know i have the option and support in whatever i decide. And when i go for a check up or any Drs visit and its asked, i have no shame, no guilt, no regret in my decision. (Bracing myself each time for backlash, tho it never comes, true pros). Im happy other women have the same relief. There should be no negativity for our choices, but when it comes, bottom line, we know we did the right thing. And its not up to them for shaming us. Edit: my dad even told my brother and I years later ‘thank you for not making me a grandpa before I was 45.’ And gave me a pointed look. It was a small weight lifted I didnt know I carried. Especially after his reaction after i told him I was pregnant. (Explosive).” –bubblymayden

“I would have an 8 year old son right now if I hadn’t gotten an abortion. The thought of having a kid, a son, creeps me out. I have 0 regrets.” –Jens0485

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com