Things That Matter

A Fight Broke Out In A Florida Home Depot Parking Lot And You Can See The Coronavirus Spreading

There is one thing that will always deliver, even during a pandemic: fights. Even while the world is on lockdown and a virus is spreading, people can still find a way to get into a fight. This fight comes to you from a Home Depot in Florida.

A fight broke out at a Home Depot parking lot in Florida.

The fight took place at a Home Depot in Tampa and the fight itself is wild. Four men are in a melee and the more you watch it, the wilder it gets. First, you notice the wildly swinging paint cans. Paint is flying and you are all wondering how in the world the people hit with the paint cans are still standing. Then you realize that the pickup truck is in the splash zone. Next thing you know, one of the men is going after someone with a shovel. Yes. A shovel that you use to dig holes with. It truly is a wild ride and it has left the Internet wanting answers. Most of all, why?

If you come across it with no warning on Twitter, the video is a lot to process.

How did this fight start? Who threw the first punch? What is there to fight over in Home Depot? There are so many questions watching this fight. It can’t be possible that the best way for this fight to go off includes paint flying everywhere.

The guy with the shovel is the sleeper in this fight.

Everything is already so crazy that you aren’t sure what to take in first. Then, out of nowhere, a shovel rises straight into the air and all of your focus goes right to it. The man slams it down hard and it isn’t clear if he hit his intended target.

Some people, while not surprised, are still just done with Florida right now.

Florida has this reputation to always draw attention to itself and never for the right reasons. This fight in the time of Covid-19 is just the latest iteration of the Florida we have come to know. From politics to bizarre moments, Florida is a frontrunner in the race to be the wildest state.

On the other side, there are people who literally cannot wait until something like this comes out of Florida.

Social media is a crazy world. There are things happening on there that you would never believe would actually happen. Yet, social media is there to take the craziness of the world and serve it right up to you on a silver platter.

READ: Remember That Viral Disneyland Fight? The Internet Just Figured Out What Really Went Down

This Iconic Mexican Food Won The Twitter Battle To Be Named Latin America’s Best Street Food

Culture

This Iconic Mexican Food Won The Twitter Battle To Be Named Latin America’s Best Street Food

Omgitsjustintime / Instagram

Let’s face it: our community knows how to do street food like no other place on Earth. From the humble Mexican taco to Argentina’s choripan and Peru’s world-famous ceviche, Latin America is a street food lover’s paradise.

So it’s no surprise that Netflix launched an entire show about our comida callejera called Street Food: LatinoAmerica. The series focuses on street food staples from around Latin America and in order to find out which street food reigns supreme, Netflix launched an online campaign to declare a winner.

In an online tournament organized by Netflix to decide the best street food in Latin America, thousands of users voted for Oaxaca’s tlayuda.

If you had to pick your favorite street food, what would it be? Could you even pick just one? Well, that’s exactly what Netflix forced people to do with a new poll to determine the best street food in Latin America, and the competition was tough. But in the end, with 46.6% of the votes, the tlayuda, that giant tortilla served with a seat of beans, tasajo (beef jerky), chorizo, chapulines, and quesillo, won the Street Food Latin America championship.

The contest was part of a promotional campaign coinciding with the July 21 launch of the Netflix series Street Food: Latin America, which takes viewers on a gastronomical tour of six countries, exploring their cultures through traditional dishes.

The tlayuda went up against choripán (Buenos Aires, Argentina), acarajé (Salvador, Brazil), ajiaco (Bogotá, Colombia), ceviche (Lima, Peru), and rellenas de papa (La Paz, Bolivia). Conspicuously missing from the list were tacos, elote, quesadillas, plátanos fritos, pupusas, and so much more.

Several major figures joined in on the campaign to ensure Mexico’s win with the tlayuda.

The competition was heated and not one country was taking any chances. In fact, the Mexican government’s official Twitter weighed in on the contest, urging its citizens to vote in the poll. Also, the U.S. ambassador to Mexico took to Twitter urging his followers to vote for the tlayuda.

Mexico is known to celebrate big wins with big parties, and some nearly expected a crowd of revelers to form at Mexico City’s famed El Angel statue, where many big celebrations are held. Though thanks to social distancing, that didn’t happen this time.

Not everyone was happy with tlayuda taking the top spot – including some very angry Peruvians.

Mexico’s tlayuda beat Peru’s ceviche fair and square: with 46.6% of the vote vs. Peru’s 45.8%. It was a close race to be sure, but the tlayuda won. And it deserved it if you ask me. However, many took to social media to express their outrage at the results.

In fact, Peruvians helped get Amazon Prime to trend on Peruvian Twitter when they decried their followers to cancel their Netflix subscription and instead sign up for Amazon Prime, as a sort of revenge against the network.

For those of you not familiar, what exactly is a tlayuda?

Credit: thatgaygringo / Instagram

Mexico’s famed tlayuda is most popular in the state of Oaxaca, where it’s said to have originated. But you can find it on the streets in any major Mexican city (as well as cities in the U.S. with large Mexican communities) as well as in upscale restaurants giving the dish a twist.

But what makes the tlayuda so special? Chef and culinary historian Rodrigo Llanes told the newspaper El País that the tlayuda is a bridge between pre-Hispanic and European culture, calling it a “magical” culinary creation.

“I do not disqualify the other candidates, but I maintain my preference for the Oaxacan entry for its historical tradition that does justice to native peoples, for its flavor that is emblematic of mestizo cooking, and for its size, which makes it a dish to share,” he said. 

Miami Hospitals Almost Full, One-Third Of Florida Children Test Positive For COVID

Things That Matter

Miami Hospitals Almost Full, One-Third Of Florida Children Test Positive For COVID

Joe Raedle / Getty Images

As COVID-19 continues to ravage Florida, parents are bracing for the start of a new year. Cities and counties across the country have announced plans to start school years with remote learning since a lack of a national plan has let COVID-19 go unchecked in the U.S.

Florida’s children are becoming sick with COVID-19 at alarming rates.

Recent numbers show that 31 percent of Florida’s children are testing positive for COVID-19. The sudden rise in cases among children, as President Donald Trump tried to force states to reopen schools, is troubling parents.

“That’s a really high number,” Dr. William Schaffner, professor of preventive medicine and Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, told Insider. “It’s a concern that translates into curiosity. We need an elaborate understanding of what that number means.”

There is a lot of concern because we still don’t know the long term effects of COVID-19.

There is so much about this virus that is unknown. Scientists and researchers have been studying the virus since it started to spread. The more we learn, the more we can fight effectively against it. The ever-changing rhetoric from scientists is proof that we are making progress in finding a way to get rid of the virus.

This news comes at the same tie that Florida hospitals are running out of ICU beds.

As cases skyrocket in Florida under the rapid reopening plan of Governor Ron DeSantis, hospitalizations are rising with it. People are being hospitalized in almost record numbers in Florida.

According to data, 54 hospitals are at full capacity and another 40 only have 10 percent ICU beds available. Hospitalizations across the state have gone up 56 percent and ventilator use has gone up 92 percent.

READ: Miami Is The New Epicenter For COVID-19 In The US