Things That Matter

Black And Latino Neighborhoods Are The Most Affected Communities By Covid-19

The novel coronavirus known as Covid-19 is still spreading in the U.S. and claiming lives. New York is the epicenter of the outbreak in the U.S. and the U.S. is the country with the most infections and deaths. At the time that this post was written, more than 1,583,000 people have tested positive for Covid-19 in the U.S. and more than 95,000 people have died. This means that about 1 in every 3 people infected with Covid-19 lives in the U.S.

Covid-19 is devastating the U.S. with more than 1.5 million people testing positive for the deadly virus.

The U.S. is the epicenter of the Covid-19 pandemic with more deaths and infections than any other in the country by far. The second closest country in terms of infections is Russia with more than 326,000 infections. A new study found that had the U.S. taken safety measures one week earlier, 36,000 lives could have been saved.

Black and Latino communities have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic.

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez represents one of the hardest-hit districts in the U.S. Her district is a majority Black and Latino district in New York has seen a devastating wave of Covid-19 infections and death. Economic inequalities have exacerbated the issues of Covid-19 and it is clear that it is having a deadly consequence.

Part of the problem is the kind of work and living conditions in these communities.

Latino and Black neighborhoods in New York are seeing infections and death rates disproportionate to the population within the state. As states begin to reopen, many Latinos are further put at risk. According to the LA Times, a large percentage of essential workers are people of color meaning that they have been putting themselves at risk during the pandemic. Now, more at being told to go to work while the virus continues to spread in the U.S.

According to data from New York, the rate of death for Latinos is 259.2 out of 100,000. This is second to Black residents experiencing 265 deaths per 100,000. For reference, whites in New York are experiencing a death rate of 160 per 100,000.

The trend of Latino communities facing a significant wave of Covid-19 is reflected across the country. According to The New York Times, Latinos in Iowa make up 20 percent of Covid-19 infections while only representing 6 percent of the population and in Washington state Latinos are 13 percent of the population but 31 percent of Covid-19 cases.

In late March, AOC called out President Trump’s lack of a response as setting the country up for thousands of preventable deaths.

A scientific study examined the Covid-19 response in the U.S. and how it could have gone differently. According to the study, had the Trump administration led and implemented social distancing measures one week sooner, 36,000 lives could have been spared.

READ: A Rail Worker Died Of The Coronavirus After A Man Who Said He Had COVID-19 Spat On Her

Latino Homes Are Experiencing The Highest Rate Of The Worst COVID-19 Symptoms

Things That Matter

Latino Homes Are Experiencing The Highest Rate Of The Worst COVID-19 Symptoms

Spencer Platt / Getty Images

COVID-19 is still a threat to the U.S. The country is experiencing a sudden spike two weeks after Americans defied social distancing rules and gathered in mass for Memorial Day. Latino households are experiencing a higher number of cases with severe symptoms and the rising cases are troubling the community.

Latino households are experiencing some of the worst COVID-19 cases.

A new analysis from USA Today found that Latino households are experiencing severe COVID-19 symptoms at higher rates. According to a study of more than 1.6 million people, Latinos, by and large, said they have experienced the symptoms tied to COVID-19. These symptoms include difficulty breathing, loss of taste, and coughing.

“Data is now emerging that matches the reality that we’re seeing,” Clarissa Martínez de Castro, deputy vice president of UnidosUS, told USA Today. “There are lots of factors at play, but among the biggest is the overrepresentation of Latinos in front-line jobs that don’t allow working from home.”

This a trend that health experts have seen within Latino communities in major cities.

Latino and Black communities have been devastated by COVID-19. The communities have been disproportionately affected by the virus with death rates higher than the population statistics in various states. Fears of discrimination and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) arrests have prevented Latinos from seeking medical care long before the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Public charge was just the latest thing,” Dr. Daniel Correa, a neurologist at Montefiore Medical Center, told NBC News. “There was already a lot of apprehension in the community before the pandemic. We were seeing concerns regarding public services, and in health care we were already seeing a decrease in public visits.”

These statistics come along the backdrop of Latinos facing the steepest financial and employment impact of any other group.

Latino households have faced the most job losses of any other demographic in the U.S. because of COVID-19. The job losses have compounded problems for the Latino community as DACA recipients and undocumented people are not eligible for federal government aid, despite paying billions in taxes.

According to Unidos US, 5.3 million out of 27.8 million Latinos in the U.S. are out of work giving Latinos the highest unemployment rate. Unemployment within the Latino community is 18.9 percent. The current national unemployment rate is 13.3 after the U.S. added 2.5 million jobs in May as states reopen.

The current job numbers are being celebrated by the Trump administration as a signal that the pandemic economic toll is ending. However, the current unemployment rate is higher than any point since the Great Depression and most jobs added are part-time jobs. The large portion of part-time employment has left some skeptical about the stability of the economic recovery.

READ: Covid-19 Cases Surge In Meat-Processing Plants As COVID-19 Spreads In Rural America

The Music Industry Has Stepped Up As The Pandemic’s Most Generous Donor

Entertainment

The Music Industry Has Stepped Up As The Pandemic’s Most Generous Donor

The music industry has been among the most affected by COVID-19, but, as businessman Stephen Brooks says, it has responded with great “generosity.”

Even though the growth in revenue in the music industry doesn’t compare with that of audiovisual productions or video games, it has been the industry that has demonstrated the most altruism during the global COVID-19 crisis.

“Everyone from the artists to the businesses have been hit hard by the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic,” Stephen Brooks, creator of the online music channel Latido Music, told Efe.

Nonetheless, he affirms that “they have demonstrated such generosity that brings honor to our art. I’ve never been more proud to belong to the global music family.”

This pride is due to the response of artists towards the crisis, as they were among the first entertainment figures to support the creation of funds to help the working class, provide concerts on social media, and give donations to help fight the pandemic.

Ricky Martin was among the first to come forward and, through his Instagram, has insisted to his followers the importance of staying home and donating to foundations that are helping to fight the virus.

The virtual concert phenomenon began with Juanes and Alejandro Sanz, whose approach was then followed by Panamanian artist Sech and Jorge Drexler, from Uruguay, who hoped to bring their music to the homes of their fans. Eventually, businesses both small and large and TV channels followed their lead.

Anglo-Saxon artists have also started their own initiatives. Rihanna announced that she had donated five million dollars through her Clara Lionel Foundation, “for food banks in high-risk communities and elderly citizens in the US, as well as the purchase of tests and materials to help the sick in Haiti and Malawi.”

Streaming platforms have also opened up their wallets, donating to funds destined to help workers in the industry who, for the most part, worked for them. Spotify donated 10 million dollars and launched an initiative that would match the donations from their listeners.

The data collected from reports run by companies like Nielsen and Billboard indicate that the growth in music has remained stable in comparison to other sectors of the entertainment business, which have been struggling. “Some have even declined. There are indicators that point to a slight user decline in music platforms and on Youtube.” 

Even then, the spirit of musicians doesn’t let up and every day they keep announcing new events on social media and organizations in need of support to help fight the pandemic. 

Click here to learn more about the music industry’s generosity during the pandemic.