Things That Matter

AOC Said In Any Other Country She And Joe Biden Would Not Even Be In The Same Party

New York Magazine profiled the superstar progressive Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez fondly known as AOC. The 30-year-old The Bronx native was not afraid to vent her frustrations with Vice President Joe Biden and the right-leaning centrists who seem to dominate the Democratic Party. 

AOC shared the same concern as many progressives: that centrists control the party at a crucial time for democracy and have a misguided approach to governing during a time when the Republican Party refuses to cooperate. 

AOC said she and Joe Biden don’t belong in the same political party.

When reporter David Freedlander asked her what she thought her place might be should Joe Biden become president, her response was candid, to say the least. 

“Oh God,” she said. “In any other country, Joe Biden and I would not be in the same party, but in America, we are.”’

Freedlander describes AOC as the tenacious hopeful many estimated her to be. She sees no reason to comprise on her values and will fearlessly stand against what’s popular. Notably, in 2019, she was the only Democrat to vote against funding the government because that would mean funding ICE. This might seem like it should be the standard — a leader with a strong sense of justice — but in a representative government, it is more common for Democrats to acquiesce to popular sentiment (i.e. centrist and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi waiting for public approval to impeach the president, rather than what the law dictates). 

AOC feels these Democrats cave too easily on the demands of the more conservative members of the party.

“For so long, when I first got in, people were like, ‘Oh, are you going to basically be a tea party of the left?’ And what people don’t realize is that there is a tea party of the left, but it’s on the right edges, the most conservative parts of the Democratic Party,” the representative of the New York’s 14th district said.

AOC describes tension within the party with one side successfully attempting to pull it right, and the other side also quite successfully trying to pull it left (i.e. the rise of progressives like the Squad, Elizabeth Warren and AOC’s 2020 pick Bernie Sanders).  

“So the Democratic Party has a role to play in this problem, and it’s like we’re not allowed to talk about it. We’re not allowed to talk about anything wrong the Democratic Party does,” she said. “I think I have created more room for dissent, and we’re learning to stretch our wings a little bit on the left.” 

AOC says that she learned from her own experiences that fear has begun to dominate how politicians govern.

The freshman congresswoman recounted an incident where she wanted to sit in on a meeting in Pelosi’s office. It was about the Green New Deal, but other members of the squad chickened out at the last minute. AOC wasn’t sure if she should go? Would the move infuriate the eventual House Speaker? 

“I was terrified,” AOC told New York Magazine. “I learned a lot about how fear shapes the decisions of elected officials: ‘I know this could be bad, and this could make someone mad, and I don’t know exactly how they would drop the hammer on me or what hammers would be dropped.’ It felt like the right thing to do, and when you say that people think it’s a form of naïveté and that it’s childish, but I don’t think it was.”

Much of the conflict exists between the moderates and progressives because of what is at stake. While moderates appear more concerned with winning elections to expand the party’s power, according to AOC, progressives seem more concerned with policy-making. That means they aren’t afraid to challenge other incumbent Democrats in elections. However, Freedlander notes that moderates have challenged far more incumbents than progressives lately. 

Progressives are too threatening to some of the more seasoned Democrats.

“As a consequence of my victory, many people are inspired to run for office, and in a body where 70 percent of the seats are safe red or safe blue, that de facto means a lot more primaries,” she said. 

Dissent is a healthy party of democracy, that is why it is protected by the First Amendment. The differences between moderates and progressives can be good: healthy competition can breed better results. However, it can be confusing for voters when such a large spectrum of values and priorities exists within one party. The person who wants Sanders to win probably has little in common with a candidate like Biden. The massive disparity forces voters to either compromise their values or become apathetic. 

“Democrats can be too big of a tent,” AOC said summing up the issue.

But if there’s one way to change politics, it is by changing the attitudes of voters. AOC wants to get more people involved, and she wants to do it by making politics more understandable. 

“Politics should be pop because it should be consumable and accessible to everyday people,” she said. “I think that’s what populism is about.”

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In A Good 2020 Surprise: AOC Nominated For Emmy

Things That Matter

In A Good 2020 Surprise: AOC Nominated For Emmy

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

This year has been filled with surprises. Most of then have not been good, i.e. Covid, but we have one now that is bringing some light to our lives. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has been nominated for an Emmy. Talk about a surprise.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has been nominated for an Emmy because of her Green New Deal video.

The seven-minute video broke down the Green New Deal that has scared and angered many. That video, with the quick painting, has been nominated for the New Analysis: Editorial And Opinion category. AOC is up against some stiff and well-known competition, including Jorge Ramos and Rachel Maddow.

The video takes people through the process of getting the Green New Deal through and the things that it can do. The video was a pivotal moment in the fight for the progressive agenda and the nomination further solidifies its place in history.

Everyone who worked on the project is stunned by the nomination.

It was a very humble and little video that aimed to educate people about a big piece of legislation that so many people were confused by. The legislation is aimed at tackling the environmental crisis that is threatening the nation and the world.

The bill is based on President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal and is using $7 trillion to create a more sustainable world. This even includes retraining people so they can take part in the green energy and sustainable shift in the economy.

Months later, this video is still inspiring people to get the deal passed.

Way to go, AOC! Good luck with the nomination.

READ: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Delivered an Impassioned Speech After the ‘Green New Deal’ Failed to Pass in the House

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Lynda Carter Encourages Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez To ‘Never Stop Being Fierce’ Amid Yoho’s Harassment

Fierce

Lynda Carter Encourages Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez To ‘Never Stop Being Fierce’ Amid Yoho’s Harassment

Hulton Archive / Getty, Samuel Corum / Getty

Two of the greatest superheroes of our time, the original Wonder Woman  (Lynda Carter) and Reprenstantive Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez are all about girl power.

Carter shared her support for the freshman lawmaker after seeing a photo of Ocasio-Cortez and a picture of Wonder Woman in the background.

Carter, who played the iconic comic-book hero in the 70s, celebrated her 69th birthday over the weekend. As part of her celebrations, she retweeted the image of the New York lawmaker writing “Okay, seeing this last night totally made my birthday that much sweeter. Love your decor, @AOC!”

Soon after, Ocasio-Cortez responded by tweeting the actress happy birthday. “Thank you for being a shining example of a woman’s strength! Happy birthday,” she replied.

AOC proved herself as a force to be reckoned with once again earlier last week when Rep. Ted Yoho called her a “bitch” outside of the Capitol.

Yoho denied the verbal attack but a reporter confirmed that he had also heard the comments.

Last Thursday, Ocasio-Cortez addressed the incident on the House floor calling “Yoho’s comments were not deeply hurtful or piercing to me” pointing out that her emotional reaction was “not new, and that is the problem.”

Ocasio-Cortez’s comments went viral after she addressed a previous “apology” made by Yoho in which he claimed that “having been married for 45 years with two daughters, I’m very cognizant of my language… The offensive name-calling words attributed to me by the press were never spoken to my colleagues. And if they were construed that way, I apologize for their misunderstanding.” He then went onto explain “I cannot apologize for my passion, or for loving my God, my family, or my country.”

In response, to his words, Ocasio-Cortez rejected his apology saying “Yesterday, Rep. Yoho decided to come to the floor of the House of Representatives and make excuses for his behavior. And that, I could not let go… I could not allow my nieces, I could not allow the little girls that I go home to, I could not allow victims of verbal abuse and worse to see that, to see that excuse, and to see our Congress accept it as legitimate and accept it as an apology.”

She concluded by adding “Having a daughter does not make a man decent. Having a wife does not make a decent man. Treating people with dignity and respect makes a decent man. And when a decent man messes up, as we all are bound to do, he tries his best and does apologize — not to save face, not to win a vote. He apologizes, genuinely, to repair and acknowledge the harm done so that we can all move on.”

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