Latidomusic

RBD Is Back With A New Single And This Is Not A Drill

RBD is as much a part of our childhoods as flan and arroz con leche. They made our childhood great and their break up was devastating. Thankfully, those dark days are behind us and RBD is finally back to give us new music.

RBD is back, baby!

After years of silence and heartbroken fans, RBD is finally back with new music. “Siempre He Estado Aquí” is the first piece of new music from the Mexican pop band in years. The band announced their final tour in 2008 and since then fans have been able to follow individual band members through their careers.

RBD’s fandom was activated as soon as the single was released.

Hearing their voices just speaks to our souls. We spent years living on the music that was left behind from their time together and there was no hope of new music in sight. That’s what makes this single a wonderful gift during an atrocious year.

It has been 12 years since we got to hear the band perform. We didn’t even need new music, it would have just been great to see the band get back together. Tbh, the new music is an incredible moment in 2020 given everything that has happened this year.

It isn’t the full RBD group, but we have to be happy with what we have.

Anahí, Christopher von Uckermann, Maite Perroni, Christian Chávez, Alfonso Herrera, and Dulce María made up the original band. The new single might not be the full band but it is enough to give us every ounce of nostalgic emotions anyone can feel. How can you not be transported back to your childhood when hearing these voices of angels?

In conclusion, go listen to “Siempre He Estado Aquí” because it will renew your love of RBD.

With only four of the original members, “Siempre He Estado Aquí” is still all of the RBD power you expect to hear. It is a song you will instantly fall in love with because it will speak right to your heart.

You can check out the full song below!

What a wonderful day to be a RBD fan, huh?

READ: All Six Members Of RBD Got Together For A Group Photo, And Fans Think They’re Teasing A Reunion Tour—Here’s Why It Might Be True

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Bolero Meets The Modern Club in Los Rivera Destino’s New Single “Castigo” with Pedro Capó

Latidomusic

Bolero Meets The Modern Club in Los Rivera Destino’s New Single “Castigo” with Pedro Capó

Los Rivera Destino

Puerto Rican band Los Rivera Destino are back with their new single “Castigo” featuring Pedro Capó. The song is the first single from their long awaited album which is due to be released this summer.

Castigo” is the best of both worlds: fusing Bolero and Dembow, creating a fresh take on songs we would listen to at the club.

We had the chance to interview Los Rivera Destino for Latido Music by mitú, and they talked about filming the music video, songs that they would like to see with Bolero covers, working with Bad Bunny again, and more.

Check out our interview below:

Watch the music video below:

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Things That Matter

Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

PEDRO PARDO/AFP via Getty Images

Mexico City is the oldest surviving capital city in all of the Americas. It also is one of only two that actually served as capitals of their Indigenous communities – the other being Quito, Ecuador. But much of that incredible history is washed over in history books, tourism advertisements, and the everyday hustle and bustle of a city of 21 million people.

Recently, city residents voted on a non-binding resolution that could see the city’s name changed back to it’s pre-Hispanic origin to help shine a light on its rich Indigenous history.

Mexico City could soon be renamed in honor of its pre-Hispanic identity.

A recent poll shows that 54% of chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) are in favor of changing the city’s official name from Ciudad de México to México-Tenochtitlán. In contrast, 42% of respondents said they didn’t support a name change while 4% said they they didn’t know.

Conducted earlier this month as Mexico City gears up to mark the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec empire capital with a series of cultural events, the poll also asked respondents if they identified more as Mexicas, as Aztec people were also known, Spanish or mestizo (mixed indigenous and Spanish blood).

Mestizo was the most popular response, with 55% of respondents saying they identified as such while 37% saw themselves more as Mexicas. Only 4% identified as Spaniards and the same percentage said they didn’t know with whom they identified most.

The poll also touched on the city’s history.

The ancient city of Tenochtitlán.

The same poll also asked people if they thought that the 500th anniversary of the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán by Spanish conquistadoresshould be commemorated or forgotten, 80% chose the former option while just 16% opted for the latter.

Three-quarters of respondents said they preferred areas of the the capital where colonial-era architecture predominates, such as the historic center, while 24% said that they favored zones with modern architecture.

There are also numerous examples of pre-Hispanic architecture in Mexico City including the Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco and Cuicuilco archaeological sites.

Tenochtitlán was one of the world’s most advanced cities when the Spanish arrived.

Tenochtitlán, which means “place where prickly pears abound” in Náhuatl, was founded by the Mexica people in 1325 on an island located on Lake Texcoco. The legend goes that they decided to build a city on the island because they saw the omen they were seeking: an eagle devouring a snake while perched on a nopal.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlán are in the historic center of the Mexican capital. The World Heritage Site of Xochimilco contains what remains of the geography (water, boats, floating gardens) of the Mexica capital.

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