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Latinas Are Sharing Their Most Reliable Acne Remedies On Instagram So We Collected Them For You

No doubt about it, acne breakouts can cause a world of woe. As the country’s most general skin condition in the country, we were pretty certain that you had at least one or two experiences dealing with a pesky pimple. If you have, you probably have questions about how to tackle them and how to prevent them. To get answers, we reached out to you for your best acne remedies and boy did you deliver.

These are the top recommendations we found on Instagram when we asked what tried-and-true acne remedies that have worked for you.

Aztec Clay

claytastic.co / Instagram

“Aztec Secret Bentonite Clay mask with Apple Cider vinegar!!”- one user wrote in reply to our post. Aztec Clay is a 100% Calcium Bentonite Clay that works to heal skin and comes in powder form. To activate the ingredients, many of our users wrote that they used equal parts of apple cider vinegar or water and mixed everything together in a bowl. You can apply this product in a 1/8 inch layer on your skin and allow to try before scrubbing it off after 20 minutes.

Apple Cider Vinegar

bragglivefoodproducts / Instagram

Instagram user ven_bailame recommended the use of apple cider vinegar and her recommendation was multiplied by so many of the replies in our post. Apple Cider Vinegar has proven to be a popular acne solution by many for years. According to Healthline, apple cider vinegar has organic acids that can kill bacteria that causes acne while also reducing the appearance of scars.

Healthy sleeping habits

slipsilkpillowcase / Instagram

“Change your pillow cases like every few days, don’t put your phone on your cheek🙌”- lettyaldrete wrote.

And it’s true! Regularly changing your bed sheets and pillow cases is so key to ensuring your skin stays clean and acne-free. Sheets are often loaded with bacteria that can clog your skin’s pores and can increase the chances that bacteria causes acne.

Healthy eating habits

rootoflifejuicery / Instagram

“Healed from the inside out by eating lots of foods that have probiotics like yogurt, keifer, kimchi, combucha, etc.”– dre_dayy13

The old adage “you are what you eat” could never be truer when it comes to your skin. Pump your system with poor foods will undoubtedly produce bad results when it comes to your skin. If you notice breakouts whenever you eat foods that are low in protein and high in saturated fats, it might be time to take a review of your diet.

Accutane.

@skinnysymmetra / Instagram

In response to our post, Instagram user jjolieth wrote that Accutane has been her go-to for tried and true acne relief. The controversial, and relatively misunderstood, medication is used to treat severe cystic acne as well as acne that is hormonal and persistent. Like any medication, you’ll want to read up and educate yourself about Accutane and discuss using it with your doctor. This acne cure comes with a powerful punch as well as potentially severe side-effects.

Find out if it’s hormonal

infertilityhertz . / Instagram

“If it’s on the jaw and cheeks, that’s hormonal…take herbs that balance your hormones-chaste tree berry, maca root, primrose oil,” lettyaldrete also shared.

Hormonal acne can have various cures but it does need a certain and particular type of attention. Hormonal acne because of skin’s response to hormonal changes and comes often as a result of a rise in androgens, such as testosterone. When it comes to working to tackling hormonal acne, treatment might need to be more aggressive than just a change in diet or the use of oils. Many women turn to birth control, Accutane or other medications for treatment.

Join Us In Welcoming Vogue Into The 21st Century: Lizzo Is Vogue UK’s December Cover Star And She’s Looking ‘Good As Hell’

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Join Us In Welcoming Vogue Into The 21st Century: Lizzo Is Vogue UK’s December Cover Star And She’s Looking ‘Good As Hell’

lizzobeeating / Instagram

There’s no denying it, Lizzo’s been having a great year, 2019 has definitely been good to her. Not a week goes by without us hearing something or another about the queen of self-love. The singer earned four VMA nominations this year, including best new artist, push artist of the year, best power anthem and song of the summer. She has a string of high profile celebs and personalities flooding her DMs and twitter feed, and before the decade draws to an end, she just landed the cover story of Vogue UK —Lizzo did THAT.

This year’s definitely got Lizzo feeling ‘good as hell’.

instagram @lizzobeeating

It’s been almost two years since Lizzo released her song “Truth Hurts,” and the singer skyrocketed up the charts and captivated the whole world with her positivity and fun energy this year. To end 2019 with a bang, Lizzo landed the cover of Vogue UK and to aptly quote her own hit, she’s looking “good as hell.”

Growing up, Lizzo recalls rarely —if at all— seeing women who looked like her in the media. 

twitter @lizzo 

The December issue of Vogue UK features the pop star clad in a glamorous Versace gown with feathered shoulders. The proud singer, happily tweeted out the cover photo this week. Lizzo told British Vogue just how much this cover story meant to her after growing up with hardly any images depicting women that looked like her in the media. 

“I would watch things on television and I would look at magazines and I would not see myself,” she told British Vogue. “When you don’t see yourself, you start to think something’s wrong with you. Then you want to look like those things and when you realize it’s a physical impossibility, you start to think, ‘What the fuck is wrong with me?’.” “I think that took a greater toll on me, psychologically, growing up than what anyone could have said to me.”

For all of us who’ve been starved for representation in fashion, this cover is a breath of fresh air.

twitter @bibbygregory

That’s why seeing Lizzo on the cover of British Vogue’s December issue—her first Vogue cover—in a plunging black couture gown, is such a deeply emotional experience for those of us who have rarely if ever seen bodies like ours, that don’t necessarily stick to the impossible “beauty norm,” represented in magazines. 

It’s a well known fact that magazines are often found guilty of extreme photoshop, which is why seeing Lizzo in her full glory is such a MOMENT.

@stretchmarkmami

What’s more, her cover is elevated, beautiful, fashionable and worthy of being seen. In the past —and perhaps still to this day, magazines have been guilty of hiding shapely bodies and airbrushing away their curves. But in this case British Vogue chose to acknowledge them instead. 

Plus-sized bodies covering Vogue have been rare—and have often been included as a token within groups of slimmer frames. Even Oprah reportedly slimmed down to a size 6 for her first Vogue cover in 1998; thankfully, her last appearance captured her in all her full-figured glory. But while many of us will be clamoring to get British Vogue’s December issue for its rare display of body positivity (the same quality many of us respond to in Lizzo, along with her undeniably infectious words), the entertainer insists it’s never been a gimmick.

“I’m not trying to sell you me, I’m trying to sell you, you.”

instagram @britishvogue

“Anybody that uses body positivity to sell something is using it for their personal gain. That’s just it,” she told Vogue. “We weren’t selling anything in the beginning. We were just selling ourselves and selling ourselves on the idea—selling ourselves on ourselves, you know?” “I’m not trying to sell you me,” she adds. “I’m trying to sell you, you.”

Whatever she’s selling, she can take our money.

twitter @setphanieYeboah

For those of us who’ve been starving for representation, the rise of Lizzo has been a healing balm. She’s a brown-skinned, big-bodied, unfiltered, unapologetic woman in a world that all too often asks us to apologize for not fitting its narrow definition of beauty, especially women (literally and figuratively).

Fashion Is The Second Most Polluting Industry In The World —And It’s Turning To Food Waste To Cut Down On Emissions

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Fashion Is The Second Most Polluting Industry In The World —And It’s Turning To Food Waste To Cut Down On Emissions

@recycle1az / Instagram

The world is in a dreadful mess if you haven’t noticed. And —surprise, surprise— a lot of it is caused by the fashion industry. Apparel and footwear production accounts for 8.1% of global greenhouse emissions —or as much as the total climate impact of the entire European Union. The current fast fashion “only wear it once” mentality is causing an unprecedented strain on the planet’s resources. And a few brands are taking note of the magnitude of the problem and see an opportunity. 

Both Fashion and the food industries are greatly responsible for an unprecedented strain on the planet’s resources.

twitter @seotaijilads

Analysts warn that the fashion market’s annual 5% growth is straining planetary resources “at an unprecedented level,” by raising production to more than 100 million tons by 2030. For those of us who don’t know, ’Fast Fashion’ can be defined as ‘the cheap, disposable clothing, made indiscriminately, imprudently and often without consideration for environmental and labor conditions’ by the companies we all love —like Zara, H&M, Forever 21 and Fashion Nova— it’s a disease and both the planet and the people are facing the consequences. 

Added on to the damage that fashion production causes, there’s the case of food production and waste. 

twitter @ajplus

Around the world, people eat around 100 billion bananas every year. That creates around 270 million tons of waste–from peels to stalks–which are often burned or left to rot. Crop burning pollutes the air, and rotting releases methane into the atmosphere and contributes to global warming. But here’s where we have good news; a few masterminds of the sustainable fashion industry took into consideration the magnitude of this waste and saw an opportunity. 

Single-use plastics and discarded fishing nets were among the first materials to be recycled into luxury products, but now it’s food waste that’s getting the sustainable spin. 

instagram @veja

US designer Mara Hoffman crafts all her buttons from tree nuts, while Hugo Boss and Veja sell sneakers made from repurposed pineapple leaves and corn starch, and Italian start-up Orange Fiber makes silk from scraps of citrus peel which has been used for Salvatore Ferragamo’s slinky floral printed scarves and dresses. 

The true pioneer of sustainable —and luxury— fashion is Stella McCartney who launched her eponymous line in 2001. 

instagram @stellamccartney

As one of the industry’s most vocal champions of environmental issues, McCartney is a strong example of the commercial potential of sustainable, ethically minded businesses. Sustainability —and an ethical standpoint— shapes the company’s policies, its underlying business model and its brand message.

Stella McCartney opted out of using animal-derived materials such as leather, silk, wool, etc. for ethical reasons as well as for the environmental impact their production causes. 

instagram @stellamccartney

The environmentally conscious brand makes buttery vegan leathers out of mushrooms. For spring/summer 2019, McCartney offered gauzy vests and T-shirts crafted from vegan silk made from yeast, and leather trousers in earthy mustards and burgundy hues.

Food waste is definitely on-trend right now.

instagram @clos19official

The huge luxury conglomerate who owns brands like Louis Vuitton, Christian Dior and Fendi —to name a few—LVMH, has teamed up with London charity Refettorio Felix for their ‘wine and spirits platform Clos19’ and host super fancy “supper clubs” where stellar chefs serve up three-course dinners using only waste produce — tickets cost £90, and each event sells out almost instantly. 

It’s a movement happening across different lifestyle categories from dining to beauty and fashion. “Food waste is definitely trending right now,” says Lisa Carolan, founder of the first waste-free wellness resort Our Retreat, in Sardinia; she introduced a waste-free policy after discovering that 1.3 billion tons of food is wasted annually. 

The growing demand for natural skincare and plastic-free packaging has seen the beauty industry wake up to waste too.

twitter @marieclaireuk

Earlier this year, The Body Shop unveiled a collection of cleansers and moisturizers crafted from organic, “ugly” carrots that are too crooked to be sold in supermarkets. UK beauty brand, Cowshed, makes its packaging from repurposed sugar cane while London-based brands UpCircle and MontaMonta have both partnered with coffee shops across the British capital to turn used coffee grounds into scrubs and serums that are sold at Cult Beauty and Liberty. 

Fashion brands will find that if they choose to use food waste, ‘The supply of material is plentiful.’ 

twitter @macrostar

Data proving that 1.3 billion tons of food is wasted annually also predicts that the figure is expected to rise to 2.2 billion by 2025 —according to the United Nations. Other statistics say that one-third of the food grown or produced in the world is discarded. “The supply of material is plentiful,” says Tom Broughton, founder of London-based eyewear Cubitts and a pioneer in the design of sustainable eyewear. 

Cubitts produces opticals and sunglasses crafted from waste materials like corn husks and mushrooms. The specs even look like they’re made from wood, mais non, they’re made from corn starch. The brown finish is added from…wait for it… potatoes and coffee grounds. 

In recent years, as the fashion industry has started to acknowledge, and wake up to the impact it has on the planet —aka. being the second most polluting industry after oil production— sustainability has become a buzzword, and the only way out. It’s encouraging to see that brands are taking serious steps in innovation to mitigate their negative impact on the planet. And just as fashion brands and designers are opting to see the value in waste rather than the waste in it, consumers also need to take their share of responsibility and shop with awareness and ethics.