Fierce

This TikTok Hack Shows A Pretty Cool Way To Grow Your Own Avocados At Home

As the pandemic continues to carry us into the infinite unknown the only thing that we can be certain of is that keeping ourselves entertained, busy, and happy is essential. Of course, any plant lover knows that one of the most simple pleasures in life is having some homegrown vegetables in the kitchen. If you’re quarantining and doing all that you can to avoid public spaces like grocery stores this truth goes double.

Recently, a TikTok user uploaded a quick tutorial on how to make your very own avocado plant using supplies you probably have around the house as well as that avocado seed you most definitely toss out way too often. We broke down the steps for you below and they’re pretty easy!

Check them out below.

Here’s what you’ll need

  • Avocado seed
  • Water 
  • Paper towels
  • Ziploc bags
  • A vase or glass

1. Once you’ve cut the avocado hold on to the seed

@BradCanning/ TikTok

As TikTok user @BradCanning points out save the seed! As you’re preparing your avocado for a feast, be sure to avoid cutting into the seed.

2. Remove the outer layer of the seed by peeling it off

@BradCanning/ TikTok

Run the seed underwater then dry it. Once it’s dried up, peel off the skin with your fingers to make sure the seed doesn’t go moldy.

3. Allow the seed to sprout and grow a root by wrapping it in a paper towel and putting it in a Ziplock bag

@BradCanning/ TikTok

After the seed has been in the bag for two to three weeks, it’s time to pull it out and crack it open.

4. Fill a jar with water and suspend the seed

@BradCanning/ TikTok

According to Canning’s TikTok “Put the root in water and it will start to sprout … be careful though, this is a total addiction.”

Make sure to place only the roots or half of the seed in water. To do this, Canning used a vase with an opening that fits around the diameter of the seed. Note: others often insert wooden pegs into the seed to suspend it above the water. The root will slowly grow into the water below which means you’ve got a healthy growing plant on your hands.

5. Once the plant gets to a good size pot it in soil.

@BradCanning/ TikTok

Once the plant gets to a good size you can pot it in soil or in a bigger vase to ensure that it keeps growing. According to SF Gate, “After that, the plant takes 10 to 15 years to grow large enough to fruit, which it only does in suitable growing conditions. In U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 10 through 12, it’s safe to grow avocado plants outside. In colder zones, they make attractive houseplants but are unlikely to bear fruit.”

For the full video check it out here.

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How ‘Latinx With Plants’ Bloomed From Instagram To An L.A. Shop Reconnecting The Gente To Plant Healing Properties

Fierce

How ‘Latinx With Plants’ Bloomed From Instagram To An L.A. Shop Reconnecting The Gente To Plant Healing Properties

Growing up, Andi Xoch’s aunt encouraged her to speak to plants. Her relatives usually laughed at the sight of a woman talking to her in-house flowers, but Xoch was intrigued. As a little girl, she acknowledged that there was life inside the pots, so conversing with them seemed standard. More than two decades later, that seed of curiosity about flora bloomed into Latinx with Plants, a digital community and IRL Los Angeles-based shop that teaches Latinxs of their ancestral relationship with herbage.

Sprouted in the spring of 2019, Latinx with Plants started as an account on Instagram. Through the page, Xoch wanted to provide representation of Latinx plant parents that she felt was lacking despite the community’s deep and vast connection with herbs and gardening.

“We’ve had a long connection with plants even before the trend started,” Xoch, a Mexico City-born, L.A.-raised organizer and artist, tells FIERCE.

“I wanted to represent that, to show that we’ve been part of this world even if it’s not presented in an Instagrammable form.”

For the past few years, so-called plant porn has dominated Instagram content. With hashtags like #plantgang and #urbanjungles, the growing trend has helped produce a new generation of young people with green fingers that are boosting sales of houseplants and inspiring even the basement recluse to be a plant parent. In fact, a National Gardening report found that 83 percent of the people in the U.S. who took up gardening in 2016 were between the ages of 18 and 34. Even more, it reported that 37 percent of millennials grow herbs and plants indoors, more than the 28 percent of baby boomers who do the same.

However, with the exception of a few accounts, including Xoch’s friend D’Real who created @blackwithplants and inspired her to make a similar account, many of these digital spaces are overwhelmingly white. This, Xoch says, ignores the history Latinxs have with plants and the sustainable practices they developed while gardening for decades.

“You walk onto our people’s front yards and you see their food: plantains, avocados [and] chayotes. And it’s all sustainable; they use pots made out of buckets and cans. It’s beautiful,” the 32-year-old says. “This is who we are. This is our culture.”

As Latinxs, Xoch says that our Indigenous roots have been forgotten or intentionally kept from us but that we can reconnect to our origins through inherited practices. Among them is ancestral medicines. At her shop, several elders come in and casually inform Xoch about the healing properties of her different plants. While the whitewashed mainstream plant blogosphere has co-opted much of the everyday traditions practiced within low-income communities of color, she finds comfort in knowing that these remedies are being passed down across generations through word of mouth and are not being commodified. 

These informal educational encounters is one of the reasons why Xoch established her brick and mortar in August. Aside from selling an array of plants at the Boyle Heights-located shop, she wanted to create a space where new plant parents and señora gardeners can enter and feel welcomed, experience the joyous power of verdure and learn from one another. 

She says that her mission is to build community and help people who feel depressed, anxious and alone, particularly amid the Covid-19 pandemic, experience the healing power of plants.

“Plants can be an asset to you because, whether you think it’s just for the plant’s sake to be alive, you are actually participating in a self-care act by nurturing your plant,” Xoch says. “They force you to get up every day and help you realize a lot of beautiful things about yourself that you forget to acknowledge: the caregiving, the attention, the love, the dancing, the singing — all the things that make it bloom are also exercises in self-love, self-care and self-preservation.” 

A newbie business owner, Xoch says she now has another objective, though: to offer a non-traditional example of success and to be honest about the struggles of entrepreneurship. 

On paper, Xoch’s road to becoming a boss seems swift and simple: She learned the location of a potential property on a Sunday, visited it on Monday, signed her lease on Wednesday and opened up shop the following weekend. However, the reality is much more complicated. A high school dropout, her lifelong dream to open a business was halted because she lacked the confidence, capital and connections to get started. Even when she did launch the store, the experience was far from easy. Xoch opened her small business from the ground up on a tight budget amid a pandemic and while her father sat ill at a hospital where doctors thought he would die.

“I want people to know this is real shit that people go through. We have the load of the world on us, we are caring for our relatives and we are trying to make sure our business is doing well,” she says. “I walk in [my store] and that alone is defying the odds.”


Follow Latinx with Plants on Instagram. For those in Los Angeles, visit the shop, which is complying with Covid-19 regulations and operating by appointment only, at 2117 E Cesar Chavez Ave.

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Latinas Are Offering Up Their Best Advice For Chicas Moving In With A Romantic Partner

Fierce

Latinas Are Offering Up Their Best Advice For Chicas Moving In With A Romantic Partner

Joerg Koch / Stringer

¡Felicidades!

If you’re here, it means you’ve made the decision to make a bigger step of commitment with your partner and have decided to move in together. For some of you, things are all uphill from the moving in process, for others it will take a lot more hard work and dedication to make things work (if that’s what you choose in the long-haul.) Fortunately, plenty of chicas are familiar with the experience of moving in with a partner and are offering up some insightful advice on how to merge your life with a partner without causing harm and keeping yourself sane.

Recently, we asked our FIERCE readers who have experienced or are currently living with their significant other for some tips.

Check out the best advice and tips below!

“Pick your battles. Everyone has their own messes and cleaning styles. Have patience to learn how they do things and for them to see how you do things. It’s also important to make time for yourself by yourself in your own home and for them to do so as well. Communication is key! (But also remember that communication doesn’t mean to fight all the time).” –jenoemi87

“You are not his/her mother. You are not his/her caretaker. You are not his/her personal chef. You are a unit. You are a team. There’s no I in team.” –lisztobombs

“Make sure you have schedules alone time daily or at least weekly👌🏾 it’s so easy to get caught up spending so much time with your person and start to lose yourself. This will only put a strain on your relationship + it’s not worth it. ALWAYS designate time that’s just for you + encourage them to do the same.” –theflowerchildbruja

“Separate bank accounts. Share bills and chores equitably. Maintain individual interests.” –deannavillanuevasaucedo

“Be patient. Not everyone was raised the same way you were.” –alexandriatrece

“Set boundaries!!!!!! Talk about finances openly. Don’t judge each other. Have patience but don’t take anyone’s sh*t.” –lisztobombs

“Get two restrooms!! It might be more money but it’s definitely worth your sanity.” –savannah_smilesssss

“Don’t be so hard on eachother. Don’t have such high expectations from your spouse, make it a point to organize and declutter every month bc most likely you’ll be moving things in the house around a lot. If you’re having issues with your partner holding up their end on chores assign them certain day where you both tackle them. Sometimes it can get overwhelming so it’s okay to walk away and finish things later. Communicate as much as possible if you’re feeling a certain way.” –neomiceleste

“Communicate. Communicate. Communicate. About everything- money, dishes, bills, hygiene regiments, sex, E👏🏼VER👏🏼Y👏🏼THING👏🏼 Trust yourself. And have a backup plan & secret savings because you never know 🤓 breakup or no, things could go south and you’ll need funds.” –alexis_danielle_quiroz

“Make time for yourselves – and also plan out chores, etc ahead of time so neither of you feel like you’re doing more than the other. Team work makes the dream work and that goes with romantic partners and also just friendships in general.” –bperformer

“Remember that you’re a partnership. Partners. That means no one is “helping out around the house” or “covering” for you. That home is yours to both care for, to cook in, clean, decorate, and provide for. Never forget that.” –alicianna88

“People aren’t mind readers so if something is bothering you let them know. Make sure the you have your own space even if it’s a corner of your room that just yours to adorne and feel safe. It can be a vanity, alter, a desk, etc. Understand each other’s love language.” –arcoiris_31

“If you are both working full time, each of you are in charge of dinner every other night. Whether it’s cooking/takeout/paying at a restaurant dinner is the responsibility one of you every other night. If you or your partner don’t know how to cook, learn together to achieve it.” –tarotqween

“Therapy. For each partner or for both. Couples therapy is not for marriages, it’s for people. Getting therapy doesn’t mean your relationship is in bad shape. It means that you value getting help with something you care about but that’s also super complex. Relationships are not easy.” –teresanastasia

“Have patience.” –izzy_gbaby

“It’s ok to do things with out each other and have your friends and have your own time. Also, money NEEDS to be right. Establish bills and rules right away.” –_gab_a_roni_n_cheese

“Make time for yourself.” –lamujeresquivel

“Speak about everything and all of it the first day! Or even before! who’s gonna do what and how it’s gonna be done, talk about what your relationship will be like, talk about having people over, talk about who pays what, listen and learn their ways because it’s HARRRRRD to do all this after time has passed and you feel the wrath of not communicating. But most importantly have fun with your new best friend/slumber party partner ! do stuff in the middle of the night, walk around naked (if you can) enjoy each other’s company!” –gold.dayummm

“It’s not easy, communication is the key!!” –pattyporteous

“What do you want out of this relationship? A true partnership or a mother who will cook and pick up after you?”- xochitl1977

“Keep your money separate. This is always, but ESPECIALLY important for the younger set.” –paranormalauren

“Let the little things go and be patient with each other.” –gambitpumpkinpie

“Discuss how they load the toilet paper in the dispenser.-rixflixs

“Separate bank accounts & make a budget of all mutual costs to split evenly down the middle.” –rebelada

“Ask for references from past roommates/live-in partners.” –quezso

“This should be titled what information should each of you reveal to the other before moving in together: credit history, bank statements, pay stubs, retirement accounts. How will you divide bills and home duties?” –latangueranyc

“Live with them for at least a year before you go marrying them lol. People who don’t live together first tend to end up having problems down the road. Get used to each other’s living habits, and routines, or work out new habits and routines together. As long as everyone is happy and things are mostly peaceful.” –october_dreams

“Always keep bank accounts and car leases/ loans separate! Always!!!”-e.d.g626

“Be Respectful Communicators. Remember that not everyone will act, think and do as you. you have to be patient when they can’t reciprocate that and don’t let shit slide either. Set boundaries too because you need to take care of your mental health too. The right ones always respect these basics.” –ferarose_

“Talk finances! Don’t use your name for bills he is responsible for.” –mar_aqui_

“COMPASSION for communication. You are growing as a couple and it may take time to find the right form of communication when being in the same place. Keep yourself independent and have your private time even if it’s under the same roof. Set ground rules before someone gets used to something.” –mariposa.in.action

“You will be sharing your space, make sure you both understand that, it’s no longer just “I” or “mine”.” –ari.r.huichapa

“Never get joint bank accounts. Keep your money separate.” –jayyyyubz

“Communication and patience are essentials. Talk to one another and set the expectations at the beginning about bills, cleanliness of the house/apt. And don’t be afraid to speak up and talk when the expectations aren’t being met. You two should be EQUALS. It’s really easy to fall into stereotypical gender roles, especially coming from a typical Hispanic upbringing.” –21djenne

“Talk about who is going to clean the bathroom, kitchen etc ahead of time.” –offical_hartbreaker

“Invest in some time, it doesn’t have to be a lot of time, each day to be really in each other’s company without electronic interruptions. Whether it be talking, dancing, or just holding each other, give yourselves that time.” –senorita_maketa

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