Fierce

Latina Diagnosed With Coronavirus Delivers Baby While In A Coma

The novelty of the COVID-19 pandemic has posed quite a few questions for the medical world. According to the World Health Organization, there is little known about the disease particularly when it concerns the impact of the disease on pregnant women and their babies. An extremely limited amount of data is available to provide obstetric medical care insight into how it could affect their patients and a recent case out of New Jersey shows the severity of this lack in knowledge.

Last month, Johana Mendoza Chancay was diagnosed with coronavirus. While she was pregnant.

According to an interview with New York Daily News, Chancay did not initially worry too much about her diagnosis. She took care of herself by self-quarantining and resting but eventually found she was having issues with her breathing. On March 30, she headed to Hoboken University Medical Center, and upon arrival was told she would have to put into a coma.

“The doctor told me pretty quick that the baby was in jeopardy. They said I would have to get an emergency C-section,” she explained. “I was freaking out,” she said. “That’s pretty much the last thing I remember.”

When Chancay woke up, fourteen days had passed and she’d delivered a one-pound baby named Zion.

Born 14 weeks early, Zion remains in the hospital in the neonatal intensive care unit, and two days after her mother was put into a coma. Chancay was awakened from her coma on April 13. She will not be reunited with her mother until July 8, her due date. Instead of getting to meet her newborn by holding her in her arms for the first time, Chancay met her by way of webcam.

“When I saw my baby [on the monitor], I cried,” Chancay told the Daily News. “It feels like everything just happened so quickly but then I realized — ‘Wow, I was there for a long time.’ ”

Chancay is now in recovery at her sister’s home in Connecticut and is undergoing physical therapy to get her strength back. She still has an open wound from her C-section that is healing and has some lung damage from the virus. According to Daily News she cannot talk or move too fast without coughing.

Speaking about interacting with her daughter through a webcam Chancay says she knows it’s necessary to keep Zion safe. The newborn has fortunately remained coronavirus free.

“She moves her hand arms a lot, and here and there I can catch her open and close her eyes,” Chancay gushed. “I feel very blessed and grateful.”

Keke Palmer Gets Real With The National Guard During Protests

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Keke Palmer Gets Real With The National Guard During Protests

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Hustlers actress Keke Palmer has always known how to deliver. Her performance as the titular character in the 2006 film Akeelah and the Bee stole the hearts of audiences watching and delivered such a strong message about perseverance. Palmer delivered yet another powerful message on Tuesday amidst the peaceful demonstrations taking place in the wake of George Floyd’s murder.

Taking part in Tuesday protests, the actress spoke to several members of the National Guard telling them that they can be part of the change.

While asking National Guard members to “be the change” in the fight against racial injustice, Keke spoke passionately about wanting to see them join protests.

“We have people here that need your help,” Palmer told National Guard officers in a video Tweeted by NBC News correspondent Gadi Schwartz. “This is when y’all stand together with the community, with society, to stop the governmental oppression. Period. We need you, so march with us.”

Palmer went on to ask members to “March with us. March beside us. Get your people. March beside us. Let the revolution be televised. March beside us and show us that you’re here for us. Let’s just do it. We start marching and you march with us. Make history with us, please.”

After listening to Palmer a guard member offered to walk with the group across an intersection but remained steadfast that they had to stay at their post.

But Palmer urged that this was not good enough.

“March with us, it will send a huge message,” Palmer continued, “You’re the protector. If you’re supposed to be patrolling us, then walk with us.”The guardsman explained again that he could not move from his post, but when another protester asked the guardsmen to take a knee they did so.

Unsatisfied, Palmer continued to say the action was not enough for her and later shared her thoughts on the events taking place across the country.

“Racism is what the country was built on slavery, systematic oppression, then voter oppression, female oppression, poor education system so you’re intentionally uninformed, financial oppression,” Palmer said in the video. “Human beings can only take so much. Americans need government reform that demands legislation and new laws that birth the future for our kids. We deserve a new system because the old one was created to oppress us.”

Working From Home Can Impact Your Mental Health, Here’s How To Stay Sane And Healthy

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Working From Home Can Impact Your Mental Health, Here’s How To Stay Sane And Healthy

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A recent survey shows that thirty-five percent of workers who telecommute said their mental health had deteriorated as a result of doing so amid the coronavirus lockdown. As someone who has gone from working in a social, fun-filled, compassionate office space, I can consider myself part of that 35%.

Although working from home (for those privileged enough to do so) is a necessity for our safety and that of the community – it definitely presents some unique challenges.

Yes, the benefits are many: avoiding transit problems and the stress of commuting; sidestepping office politics; adopting a flexible schedule that allows for chores and errands to be incorporated into the work day; more time with family and pets; and a break on keeping up a business wardrobe and other appearance-related expenses.

But there’s a dark side. It’s an arrangement that fosters isolation and disconnection, two conditions that feed the greedy depression monster.

Here are some excellent tips for taking care of your mental health during these unprecedented times.

Break up your workday

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Some common challenges when working from home during the pandemic is the lack of stimulation and connection to people you used to see regularly. This can become a bit confusing, so it’s great to try to break up the schedule.

One of the best tips for working from home that I’ve discovered is breaking up the work day with movement. This can be a quick burst of movement (like jumping jacks, or lifting kettle bells) or some lower impact movement like a walk. I’m also a huge fan of taking a mid-afternoon break (longer than your typical 30-minute lunch break) to go on a long walk or run errands.

Get a routine and stick to it

Routine is essential, and it’s even more important when structure is missing.

Sticking to a routine does not mean that you have to abide by the old standard 9-5 office hours, and only take downtime in the evening. It simply means that you have a system for waking up on time, getting ready, feeling confident and getting your work done in a timely manner. 

When you do this regularly enough, it will feel more natural over time, and you won’t have to think about it so much. For me, this has meant taking my dogs out on a walk to get a coffee in the morning and then coming home and getting to work – it’s like creating my own little commute.

Stay connected

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Remember to keep up with friends and family, even if that can only be done through a Zoom or FaceTime call. Text someone you care about, and when restrictions are lifted in your area, try to make plans as regularly as you feel comfortable.

Connection is key, and it can be challenging when you don’t leave your home for long stretches of time.

It’s also helpful to join platforms of people doing similar work as you and interacting with them throughout the day. Or you can join an online book club or participate in volunteer work – having this sort of obligation will go a long way in helping you show up when you don’t feel great.

Incorporate wellness activities into your day

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One of the biggest perks of working from home is that you get to do things you might not be able to if you’re in an office all day.

I’ve been doing 20 minute walks around my neighborhood while listening to music. This moves the energy in the body and allow us to to have a shift in consciousness, which is so important when you’ve been isolated in front of a computer screen.

Another way to experience new energy in the body is to pause from work, find a comfortable place to sit, and then do deep belly breaths. This involves taking one deep breath in, and then focus on the exhale. You’ll notice your shoulders will relax, and your body will feel lighter.

Learn how to detach

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It’s so important when working from home that you keep your work and personal lives and actual physical areas totally separate. For many, it may not be possible to create an actual separate office space but you can create workspaces outside of your most “lived in” spaces. That’s what matters most.

There is a risk that working hours will get longer if the boundaries between work and personal life become blurred. It is necessary to establish a rigid system in which work can be carried out in a planned manner, such as by setting working hours and the timing of contact with supervisors.

No matter what you do, remember that working from home is yet another “new normal” to get used to — and the sooner you adapt to what makes you most productive, healthy, and mentally well, the better.