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This 12-Year-Old MENSA Member Is Starting His Sophomore Year of College But Stays Humble— ‘I Just Grasp Information Quickly’

Twelve-year-old Caleb Anderson has a head on his shoulder that’s steering him towards a bright and brilliant future. Most kids Anderson’s age are diving headfirst into their 7th-grade year, he on the other hand is headed to college.

Back to college that is.

Anderson is currently enrolled at Chattahoochee Technical College as a sophomore.

From Marietta, Georgia, he’s on track to graduate with his bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering in two years. Speaking to CBS News for an interview the pre-treen remains humble and chalks up his success to being quick.

“I’m not really smart,” Caleb explained in his interview with the outlet. “I just grasp information quickly. So, if I learn quicker, then I get ahead faster.”

When it comes to pursuing his education, Anderson has his eyes set on a greater prize than just earning his bachelor’s degree. The 12-year-old is intent on heading off to Georgia Institute of Technology or the Massachusetts Institute for Technology. He’s hoping to eventually wind up with an internship at Tesla working for SpaceX founder Elon Musk.

“When I was like 1, I always wanted to go to space,” Anderson said in a separate interview with USA Today. “I figured that aerospace engineering would be the best path.”

Just twelve and Anderson has made quite a few other accomplishments.

At just 9 months old he learned how to do American Sign Language began reading just a few months later. “I have this distinct memory of going to a first-grade class and learning there, and everyone was way taller than me, because, you know, I was 2,” he explained to USA Today. “I could barely walk!”

According to his interviews, Anderson began solving math equations by the time he reached his second birthday and qualified for MENSA at just 3 years old. MENSA is the largest and oldest high IQ society across the globe. The non-profit organization is open to people who score at the 98th percentile or higher on a standardized intelligence test. Members have included the likes of Geena Davis, Nolan Gould of “Modern Family,” and Joyce Carol Oates.

Explaining what it is like to raise a genius, Anderson’s father Kobi WKYC that he realized his kid was special when he began to speak to other parents.

“As we started to interact with other parents, and had other children, then we started to realize how exceptional this experience was because we had no other frame of reference,” Kobi explained. “He has far surpassed me in math, so I can’t help him anymore. Seriously! He’s in calculus two now!”

When it comes to her son, Anderson’s mother says that she hopes other parents see him as an example and that he inspires other Black children.

“I think people have a negative perspective when it comes to African-American boys,” she explained. “There are many other Calebs out there… African-American boys like him. From being a teacher — I really believe that. But they don’t have the opportunity or the resources.”

Check out Anderson’s interview below!

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Rep. Ruben Gallego Broke Down Jared Kushner’s White Privilege In A Twitter Thread About Their Paths To Harvard

Things That Matter

Rep. Ruben Gallego Broke Down Jared Kushner’s White Privilege In A Twitter Thread About Their Paths To Harvard

Greg Nash / Pool / AFP via Getty Images

Jared Kushner recently made headlines for saying that Black Americans have to “want to be successful.” Kushner continued in the Fox & Friends interview saying that Trump policies are trying to help them with issues that “they’re complaining about.” Congressman Ruben Gallego of Arizona took to Twitter to call out Kushner and his easy, money-paved path in life after the interview aired.

Rep. Ruben Gallego has a few words about Jared Kushner’s claim that Black Americans don’t “want to be successful.”

Kushner, Ivanka Trump’s husband, was being interviewed by Fox & Friends when he suggested that Black Americans don’t want to successful. He added that the Trump administration has created policies to help Black Americans. Specifically, the Trump administration has created policies to help Black Americans overcome things that “they’re complaining about.”

The interview was immediately slammed by Democrats and activists as being tone deaf. Furthermore, the rhetoric is reminiscent of language used against the Black community for decades to justify policies that disenfranchised and injured the Black community.

Rep. Gallego was one of Kushner’s classmates at Harvard and the two had very different paths to the prestigious school.

Rep. Gallego created a Twitter thread to show the hoops he had to jump through in order to make it to Harvard. As a Latino from a middle class family, Rep. Gallego didn’t have a lot of the same luxuries afford to him like someone of Kushner’s background. The congressman’s story about his way to the Ivy League school is something a lot of people of color can relate to.

The story is an extension and deeper dive into the college admission scandal narrative.

Rep. Gallego detailed his four years in high school with the mission of making it to Harvard. For him, that meant studying for his exams for years with free and used test preps he could get his hands on. There was a community support to make it possible for him to get materials he needed.

According to Data USA, Harvard’s student body is heavily white. The data shows that 41 percent of students are white, 13.5 percent are Asian, 8.19 percent are Hispanic or Latino, and 5.35 percent Black or African-American.

Even the interviewing process was something so many other students didn’t have to contend with.

Some universities, especially ivy league schools, require prospective students to interview with alums and administrators. These interviews weigh heavily in the process and for Rep. Gallego, they were not easy to get to. He had to rely on public transportation to make it to his various interviews around Chicago.

Rep. Gallego spent four years getting ready to go to Harvard.

After four years of hard work and sacrifice, Rep. Gallego was accepted to Harvard. His path to Harvard was filled with friends and family helping him along the way, which is common in Latino communities. It is a story that many of us are familiar with but it isn’t a truly universal story, as Rep. Gallego points out about Kushner.

Kushner’s easy path to Harvard is why the congressman took issue with Kushner’s comments.

Documents show that Kushner got into Harvard after his father pledged a $2.5 million gift to be paid in annual installments of $250,000. Both of Kushner’s parents were also members of Harvard’s Committee of University Resources and donated to the school. In an interview with ProPublica, a former administrator at Kushner’s high school admitted that no one at the school believed that he got admitted on his own merit. The official said that neither his grades nor SAT scores warranted his admission into Harvard.

Rep. Gallego ended his thread asking people to donate to the Biden campaign and the United Negro College Fund.

Rep. Gallego is clearly not letting this story go by without weighing in. Kushner’s comments have set off a firestorm of frustration with people across the nation.

READ: College Admissions Scandal Mastermind Reportedly Told Parents To Lie About Ethnicity To Further Advantage Their White Children

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Women Are Opening Up On How To Address Postpartum Depression During The Lockdown

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Women Are Opening Up On How To Address Postpartum Depression During The Lockdown

ABC

At some time or another everyone struggles with their mental health. These days, with the world in lockdown and so many of our human interactions limited, things can feel at best bleak and at worst a complete nightmare. This truth can be doubly true for women who are in the throes of a postpartum.

New mothers are facing a different type of difficulty when it comes to the after-effects of giving birth. Postpartum or postnatal depression affects one out of every 10 new mothers. According to the PANDAS (Pre and Post-Natal Depression Advice and Support organization, during the first week of the pandemic, there was a 75% increase in calls to its helpline, underlining the fact that new mothers need support more than ever.

We asked women for advice on how to cope with Postnatal depression and found some enlightening answers. Check them out below!

“We must be more open to being supportive instead of telling us things like “querías niños no??”. ” This is what u signed up for”. I never received the support from family and when shit finally hit the fan I was judged for my extreme actions. My attempts and self harm were seen as attention seeking.” –flor___venenosa

“This is so cultural. I am so sorry you went through this. It’s no wonder we don’t seek help, we are ridiculed for it.”- mrs_tori_rose@flor___venenosa 

“I think I had PPD when I talked to my mom about it she brushed it off and til this when she brings it up in front of others saying, “I thought she didn’t love her daughter. She kept crying and saying how hard it was. It’s not hard I really thought you didn’t want your daughter.” It is so hurtful every time she makes those comments and really makes me angry. Because it’s not that I didn’t love my baby I was having a hard time adjusting to motherhood. I need to figure out a way to tell to stop saying or making those comments because they aren’t helpful. For me it lasted for about a year. It got better as time went on. I was scared to talk to my doctor about it and was never on medication or anything.” –poncigue

“Did you know even when women finally speak up and say I THINK I HAVE POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION THAT THERES IS NO REAL HELP? You can google all you want and call all the hotlines you want but if you don’t have insurance- you are getting much help.” –90dayfrump

“I did after my daughter was born. I couldn’t figure out why I was so angry & sad when it should’ve been one of the happiest times in my life. This lasted for about a year & half for me.” –dee_mahree

“It would have been so helpful to have known this. My first year of motherhood was so challenging; I had no idea how depressed I was until I went to therapy.” –gg_luv

“I had PPD after my three pregnancies. During the third one I also had perinatal depression which is even less talked about. Like a lot of mental health issues I think it’s hard for people to understand especially when you are expected to be happy all the time because you have a bebé.” –piraguadeframbuesa

“I can believe this because I had postpartum depression with my first pregnancy for 9 months.” –mjtobeone

“Generational healing together.” –cynthiarey_jefa

“More post like this please!”- stephreyesfig

“I was just talking about this last night on how I didn’t get any help from anyone around me I still had to do everything! And I would forget to eat! To feed my new born baby I was detached and I would scream and I hit my 3yr old and still crying right now because my family still tries to throw it in my face that I was a bad mom! I said with people like you around me yes now I regret not leaving when I could I probably would of been better off for my kids and especially for my self I hardly smile now, I’m bitter, I try to make things better but I can’t take back what I did.” –ambelly11212

“I think I had both.” –claudia_renee@rrsls10 

“do you follow this page? If not, you should.. and get yourself highlighted here!” –nicleff@lescarbajalxo 

“*nuestro poder*” – florycantoacademy@fiercebymitu

“I ‘m still surprise on how I made so much profit after seeing many people complains of being scammed this is just amazing am still shocked thanks.” –investor_with_johnw22

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