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Malia And Sasha Obama Speak About Their Mother Michelle Obama’s Success In Netflix Doc ‘Becoming’

It’s been a little over three years since Michelle and Barack Obama left the White House and yet, we’re still begging for four more years! (It’s no wonder with our current White House situation.)

While Michelle Obama has been open about her disinterest in taking up the mantle of the Oval Office herself, she hasn’t shied away about her desire to continue to lead. In November 13, 2018, Obama published her book Becoming, a memoir that takes readers on a deeply personal tour of her roots, her discovery of herself, her time in the White House, and the public eye, as well as her role as a mother as well.  

And while Obama has been open about her experience with motherhood, her two daughters, Malia and Sasha, have largely stayed clear of the limelight and conversations about their famous parents.

There’s no denying that the two former first daughters spent some of the most formative years of their lives in the White House. For eight years the two sisters watched their parents lead the country and while they’ve remained largely private about their lives, they both make surprise appearances in the new Netflix documentary “Becoming.”

“Becoming,” follows Michelle Obama’s journey as the author of her wildly successful memoir of the same name debuts May 6 and according to E! News gives viewers a rare glimpse into the lives her daughters.

According to E! News Sasha appears to praise her mother’s hard work and vigor saying “I’m excited for her to be proud of what she’s done, because I think that that’s the most important thing for a human to do, is be proud of themselves.”

Malia also makes an appearance and expresses her joy at her mother being able to come into her own thanks to a lack of public attention. “Being able to let all that leave your mind, creates so much more space,” Malia explains.

In the documentary, Malia notes that despite her mother’s absence from the White House many continue to push for the messages and values she campaigned for.

“This has demonstrated, in a way, just like, d*mn, those eight years weren’t for nothing, you know?”Malia points out in the doc. “You see that huge crowd out there? And that last speech you gave.”

And her daughter is right. The success of her mother’s book, which includes 10 million copies sold, is just a one proving factor that the excitement and passion for Michelle Obama as an influence continues.

Black Books To Read To Your Children Right Now

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Black Books To Read To Your Children Right Now

The Books Wars

Black children of today are being forced to face literally a world of uncertainty and so much pain. Still, that doesn’t mean that the world they look at is without its potentials and that their efforts won’t make an impact.

In light of recent events, we’ve gathered a list of children’s books to read to your children as a reminder that they are powerful and that Black lives really matter.

Hey Black Child by Useni Eugene Perkins, illustrated by Bryan Collier

Amazon.com

This poetic and lyrical children’s book for Black readers is a reminder to dream big. Beautifully illustrated and perfect for out-loud reading, this book will instill pride in the radical and cultural identity of those who are Black.

Ages 3–10.

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats

Amazon.com

Published in 1962, The Snowy Day is a children’s book that follows Peter, an African American boy, who takes a walk around his neighborhood after the season’s first snowfall. Written by Ezra Keats this book received the 1963 Caldecott Medal for its artwork and was the first picture book that featured an African American protagonist.

Ages 2 and up

Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History by Vashti Harrison

Amazon.com

This book might be intended for children ages 3 to 7 but it’s an important one for children and people of all ages. Educational and inspiring this book is a dedication to forty Black women in American history. Flip through these pages and learn more about the activists like abolitionist Sojourner Truth, pilot Bessie Coleman, chemist Alice Ball, politician Shirley Chisholm, mathematician Katherine Johnson, and poet Maya Angelou.

Ages 3 – 7

Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry

Amazon.com

Teach your little one about self-love and Black beauty with this book about Zuri a girl who has hair with a mind of its own. Fortunately, her dad steps in to take up the phone and help her sort through her kinks, coils for a special event.

Ages 4 – 8

Sulwe by Lupita Nyong’o

Amazon.com

Written by Black actress Lupita Nyong’o, this whimsical book is a celebration of Black skin and beauty. Nyong’o’scharacter Sulwe has skin the color of midnight and yearns to be beautiful and bright, like her mother and sister but a magical journey in the night sky, fortunately, changes her opinion of everything.

Ages 4 – 8

He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands by Kadir Nelson

Amazon.com

Nelson’s children’s book takes flight with one of America’s best-known songs and follows a boy and his family as they live in and engage in the world we live in.

Ages 4–8.

Black Mother, Amber Isaac, Tweeted Concerns About Hospital Care During Childbirth Before Her Death

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Black Mother, Amber Isaac, Tweeted Concerns About Hospital Care During Childbirth Before Her Death

GoFundMe

COVID-19 isn’t the only epidemic that should have you feeling alarmed. Across the globe, Black women continue to be mistreated, overlooked, and undervalued in the hallways of medical facilities and amongst medical professionals. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Black women are “three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women.”

Described by some medical professionals as a public health and human rights emergency the increasing number of birth-related deaths amongst Black women are preventable.

Just like the death of Amber Isaac.

Isaac was a 26-year-old black, Puerto Rican New York mother-to-be who passed away on April 21st.

While news of her death began trending last week on social media, most major news outlets have failed to report on the young mother’s death which occurred at the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx. According to ESSENCE, Isaac’s death stemmed “from complications in delivering her son Elias who was born after midnight.” Isaac’s partner Bruce McIntyre, 28. In an interview about his partner’s death, McIntyre said that Isaac died less than four days after she’d tweeted about wanting to write an exposé on dealing with incompetent doctors.


Isaac, who died alone due to current measures to prevent the spread of the Coronavirus in hospitals, was pronounced dead due to complications with her cesarean section.

“All of this was 100% preventable. All of it,” McIntyre told The Guardian in an interview. “I feel like she would have got more attentive care if she was a white mother, to be completely honest with you.” According to The Guardian, McIntyre described Isaac’s pregnancy as being “riddled with neglect by rude and unprofessional staff at the Montefiore Medical Center,” who ignored Isaac even when she looked to them for help with her concerns during her final weeks of pregnancy.

Dr. Joia Crear-Perry, founder and president of the National Birth Equity Collaborative described Isaac to The Guardian as being a healthy woman who had done all that she was supposed to during her pregnancy. “And she’s not the only one. That’s the story of the black maternal mortality issue across the United States,” Dr. Crear-Perry said about Isaac.

According to the Guardian “In New York City, black women are nearly eight times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women. Latinas in the metropolis – especially Puerto Ricans – also face higher risks of life-threatening complications during childbirth.”

“Unfortunately, what I see when I look at Amber Rose’s case is a beautiful young woman who fell through our big, gaping hole of a healthcare system,” Crear-Perry told the outlet.

Isaac’s death has sparked an outcry over the unnecessary deaths of Black mothers online.

Friends and family of the late mother have created a GoFundMe page to help support Isaac’s son and to give her a funeral service.