Fierce

Latinas Are Sharing Their Most Treasured Memories Of Their Abuelos And It’s Exactly What We Needed This Month

When it comes to celebrating our Latinidad, there’s no denying that Latinos need much more than a month to celebrate our accomplishments, cultures, and contributions. Still, since 1988, people across the country have used Hispanic Heritage Month to commemorate the contributions of Latin Americans in the United States. This month, just like every other month, we’re recognizing and celebrating our Latinidad by sharing stories and moments from our followers.

Recently we asked Latinas on FIERCE to share their memories of some of the most influential Latinos in their lives: their abuelos.

Check out their sweet stories below.

“Ayy mis abuelos; I truly believe they were my soulmates. So many favorite memories. From my grandpa waking up early to start praying and writing his devotionals, to them sitting on the back swing HE MADE praying the rosary, playing backyard baseball with him & my cousins, my grandma sitting outside watching while croquets, watching novelas with her, they were the loves of my life, the sunshine my soul always needed to be happy….I’ll never trade any of my amazing moments with them. My angels; Catalina y Felipe Sustaita.” –melannram

“My abuelito passed away almost 10 years ago now, he was sick ever since I could remember so I was never able to make memories with him. Earlier this year I got to visit the rancho in MX where he raised my dad and tios. A little back story, I have this belief and connection to white butterflies. Whenever I see them or they cross my path I am convinced it’s my abuelito telling me that he’s near or watching over me🤎 anyways, on our way to the ranchito which I had only visited once before when I was about 4, we were guided by these hand sized white butterflies, it was absolutely beautiful. My abuelito really lead us to his casita in the rancho. I could feel his presence and happiness that his grandchildren had the opportunity to visit his home 🤎 this is my favorite memory, this is the memory that I cherish,
– a memory that brings me joy.” –sandra_larios

“Seeing my grandpa make my grandma a cocktail when she came home from a long day at work. He would leave her cocktail for her on the kitchen counter, so it was the first thing she’d see when she walked through the door. They taught me it isn’t always grand gestures, but a lot of the small ones that count.allimae2011

“My abuela started losing her memory early on but she always remembered the story of how she met our Abo until the day she passed. I was the type of kid that kind of resisted learning spanish, but hearing her tell those stories in her beautiful Puerto Rican accent made me fall in love with the language in a way I had never before. I owe my love of spanish and story telling to her. She was a wonderful story teller and I’ll always hold the fondest memories of sitting in her terraza with her 70s furniture, drinking cafecito, and talking about the man who made her fall head over heels in love.” –
alfonsina_mj

“Hearing them talk in the kitchen, drinking their coffee while listening to boleros.”- mel_aguirre1

“Making homemade tortillas with my ama.” – alwaysdulcee

“My Cuban 🇨🇺 Abuelitos riding in the back seat of their Mercedes and watching Abuelo open the door for Abuela every time. My Mexican 🇲🇽 side was making tortillas with Abuela and Abuelo teaching me to drive his truck. At 7 years old!” – brigittecasaus

“Making tamales for us just because.” – angierivera4265

“Cruising with my grandpa, building a studio with grandpa, changing the oil, tire, battery and learning to pump gas with grandpa. But my favorite one, him teaching me to read a clock with a song.” – 2ev37

“Meeting my grandma for the first time when she came to visit us in the US. I was 4 years old! It was so exciting because I would only speak to her in the phone and to finally meet her was a blessing. She was such an amazing lady ! She passed away 7 years ago. I wished she and I could of seen each other more often.” –_lizzylivvy28

“I would sit down on the little old sofa in our living room with my abuelito. He would tell me stories about him when we was younger. I always loved it when he would tell me the story about how he met my abuelita.” –
emigandar

“My grandparents weren’t together anymore, but they we’re 2 special people. My grandpa would always call at the crack of dawn on my birthday. I hated it as a kid, but loved it as an adult. And I’ve missed them the last few years of his life. My grandma would make our birthday cards and send them via mail. When we’d get them they would always be different. I miss those A LOT. They were always personalized and she knew details about the things I was going through so she made them specific to that. It was so special the little things they did for us. We lost my grandma 7 years ago and my grandpa a year ago in July.” –e_bonita89

“They raised me so having coffee with both of them. Eating watermelon with my grandpa and then reading together. Watching old movies together then taking naps. My grandma and I love watching novelas and then talk about them. I still walk with her to 26th street (little Village) or to our nearest aldi.” –melyssa.1997

“Mi abuela used to wake me up on weekends. She would enter the room singing “buenos días su señoría mantantirulirula”. She used to give me a hair brush, and while she was opening the window she would say “brush your hair hija, so the sleep will go away. I opened the window for it to go”. I would brush my hair and convince myself that I got rid of my sleepiness. My grandma is 90 now, and she’s still magic like this.” – iamevyi

“In 7th grade I missed the bus, and I hated missing school, and I cried the entire day because I was scared my parents were going to yell at me, and my grandma stopped my dad before he came in and told him what happened and how it was her fault I missed the bus, because she accidentally unplugged my alarm, even though it wasn’t true.”-
tinnaafaceee

“When my daughter was 6, I took her to visit my grandparents in Mexico. We arrived to the airport at night. It was crowded, a little disoriented, my baby seemed nervous as we were going through customs & she asked me “what if Grandpa can’t find us?”, Just then I saw movement through the large window ahead of us, it was my Abuelito, elbowing his way through the crowd, waving and smiling at us. He was always there when I needed him.” –magpieinaz

“Abuelos? Don’t have them. (Bad joke) They passed before I ever got to meet them. My parents never really talk about them, I think it’s too painful. I often wonder if there are any traits I have from them or if I do anything that my parents might say, oh she got that from my mom/dad. I’m happy my son has all 4 grandparents; I take a billion pictures of him with them.” –_nancysalto

melannramAyy mis abuelos; I truly believe they were my soulmates. So many favorite memories. From my grandpa waking up early to start praying and writing his devotionals, to them sitting on the back swing HE MADE praying the rosary, playing backyard baseball with him & my cousins, my grandma sitting outside watching while croquets, watching novelas with her, they were the loves of my life, the sunshine my soul always needed to be happy….I’ll never trade any of my amazing moments with them. My angels; Catalina y Felipe Sustaita ❤️

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These Virtual Events Will Let You Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month From The Comfort Of Home

Culture

These Virtual Events Will Let You Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month From The Comfort Of Home

Martin do Nascimento / Getty Images

This year’s celebrations of Hispanic Heritage Month come at an increasingly troublesome time. And for many of us, it’s hard to find the strength or energy to find something to celebrate.

At this time last year, a slew of federal immigration policies that brought fear and confusion to the Hispanic community had been announced. It seemed vital at the time to spotlight many of the positive contributions of the nation’s Hispanic community.

Today, we’re in a pandemic and a national reckoning on racial injustice is afoot. We must now dig even deeper to find the way forward. Local traditions, especially those that bolster cultural understanding and embrace our city’s diversity, can play larger, more meaningful roles this year if we all take time to honor the people and history behind them.

Don’t miss the chance to look beyond the festive atmosphere to truly connect with others in the community who might also be feeling a bit more introspective these days.

Though you may not be able to partake in person, you don’t have to miss out on the celebration. You can read books by Latino Authors, stream Latino movies and shows, and listen to music by Latino artists for starters. You can also donate to organizations dedicated to causes within the community. Organizations like RAICES, the Latino Equality Alliance, and the Latino Community Foundation are all great places to support. Then, mark your calendar for some of these online events being hosted in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month.

Latin Fashion Week

From Sept. 16 until Sep 22., Latin Fashion Week Colorado is hosting a digital event every night. Each night will feature one of 35 designers and artists from around the world. See the full line-up here.

Cooking Class With Eva Longoria

In partnership with Airbnb, Eva Longoria is hosting a Zoom cooking class in honor of Latinx Heritage Month. To try and snag a spot, you’ll want to register on Tuesday, Sept. 22 at 9 a.m. PT. The event costs $103 per person and all proceeds will benefit the Eva Longoria Foundation.

Listen To Latin American Classical Music Performed Live

Florida’s Palm Beach County Library is holding series of online events from dance performances to cooking classes to story hours for kids. On Wednesday, Sept. 23, Violist David Pedraza will be performing classical music by Latin American composers. Register for the event here.

Salsa & Latin Dance Classes

Sure the salsa class might be for those over 50 (since it’s being hosted by AARP) but what a great way to get your parents or abuelos in on the celebrations. But for those of us under 50, Dallas College also has a series of Latin dance classes being held online throughout Latinx Heritage Month. For more information, check out Dallas College’s calendar of events

Take Part In An AfroLatinidad Panel

As we celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, it’s important to make sure that all of us are included. That’s why this panel is so exciting!

On Thursday, Oct. 1, Illinois’ College of Lake County is hosting an Afro-Latino Panel via Zoom Meeting. Panelist will share their experience being Afro-Latinos, an often-overlooked demographic within the Latinx community. See more about the event here.

From Mi Cocina to Your Cocina: A Cooking Class

Arizona State University is hosting all sorts of interesting virtual events this year to celebrate Hispanic Heritage month. One of those events is a cooking class being held online on Friday, Sept. 18. You can register here.

Attend An Event With The Congressional Hispanic Caucus

From September 14-18, the Congressional Hispanic Caucus is hosting an online conference: the CHCI 2020 Leadership Conference, meant to help develop the next generation of Latino leaders.

Shortly after the Conference comes the The 43rd Annual Awards Gala, coming Sept. 21, 2020. Click here for more details about this event. 

Get Set And Get Ready To Vote

Voting may look different this year, but that doesn’t change the power of your voice. To provide some clarity, UnidosUS is hosting the town hall “Vote 2020: Get Ready, Get Set” to educate and prepare voters with what they need to know to cast their ballot in November. Voting experts will talk through your voting options and help you make a voting plan that best suits your needs.

Join us virtually on Monday, September 21 at 6 p.m. EST. 

Join The US Hispanic Chamber Of Commerce National Conference

At the end of September (Sept 27-29), the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce invites you to attend their 2020 National Conference.

They’re calling it the virtual business event of the year and it’s sure to have lots of interesting networking and learning opportunities.

Click here for more information

Attend Prospanica – The Leading Hispanic Networking Event

From October 12-16, you can join in on the Prospanica Conference and Career Expo – completely virtual.

The 2020 Prospanica Virtual Conference and Career Expo, “Generacion Lider,” will bring together a powerful cohort of diversity-minded corporations, government agencies, non-profit organizations and universities looking to attract top Hispanic talent. 

Designed to educate, inspire, and connect, Prospanica’s one-of-a-kind conference allows attendees to plug into a national leadership community invested in their long-term success.

Click here for more information. 

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An Abuelo Got A Hurtful Note From Bad Neighbors About His Decorations And Latino Twitter Came Into Comfort Him

Things That Matter

An Abuelo Got A Hurtful Note From Bad Neighbors About His Decorations And Latino Twitter Came Into Comfort Him

@goldenstef / Twitter

We are rarely more defensive than we are for our abuelos. The viejitos have always been there for us and seeing them treated unkindly is just heartbreaking. That is what one Twitter user experienced after her abuelo got a wretched note about his decorations outside his home.

This is the horrid letter left for @goldenstef’s abuelo by undesirable neighbors.

The letter, which is filled with misspelled words, calls the abuelo’s house an example of a “low class Mexican family.” The letter was written anonymously by neighbors and delivered to the abuelo in an attempt to shame him into changing his decorations. One of the most bizarre moments in the letter is when the angry author criticized the homeowner for having too many American flags claiming he isn’t patriotic and can’t fool the neighbors. Like, which one is it people?

The Twitter user followed up with photos of the house to show the decorations their abuelo has out front.

People flooded the Twitter post with comments supporting and sending love to the abuelo. Fellow Latinos are ready to stand with the abuelo and some just want the names of the people behind the letter so they can talk to them. Some people are stunned at how far the author was willing to go out of their way to be mean to an old man who just wants to decorate his home and front yard.

Latino Twitter wants to come together to let the abuelo know that his decorations are adorbs.

We need to come together to give her abuelo all of the wonderful decoration we love. Let’s turn his house and front yard into a showcase of all of the greatness that Latin America has to offer.

People are falling in love with this viejitos yard.

Honestly, this is a great yard. Who wouldn’t want a yard like this? This yard is original and adorable and worth all of the praise that we can muster. Thank you to people like this for making their yards something unique and worth seeing.

@goldenstef wants everyone to know just how much they appreciate the sweet messages about their abuelo’s yard.

It costs nothing to be kind. It is even better when you can be kind about something someone clearly cares so much about. Who cares if someone decorates their lawn a little too much. At least they are having fun with their lives and that is something we all need more of right now.

READ: Latinas Are Sharing Their Most Treasured Memories Of Their Abuelos And It’s Exactly What We Needed This Month

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