Fierce

Latinas Are Defining Their Natural Hair For Themselves And It’s Pretty Beautiful

Pelo. Whether we grow it, curl, straighten it, or shave it we sure can’t seem to get enough of it. While, of course, we understand that having hair does not define us, for so many of us it means so much. After a recent stunning post, we found on Instagram posted by @goddess.veil we decided to ask Latinas the ultimate question.

“How would you describe your natural hair?”

And as it turns out, Latinas had quite a bit to say. Check it out below.

This chica described it as her BFF.

“El frizz y volumen mis mejores amigos!!” –beaamartz

“My hair is naturally red, extremely thick, coarse, and wavy. I even had a hairdresser compare it to llama wool I have learned how to take better care of it now that I’m older and not hate it anymore.”- katy_katie_katu_kat

And so many chicas called it wild and loved.

“Wild, free and unapologetic! I’m so glad I never listened to all the negative people that used to tell me to straighten my hair…no heat damage over here boo.” – lizbeth_ariana

“My glory it’s long curly and rebellious lol no matter what products I put in it does it’s own thing so I’ve embraced my natural curls and baby hair and even my natural color.” – ari_sotof

“Wild.” – tatismoreira

“God-gifted.” – jcarcreative

Greñuda and perfect.

“Greñuda con estilo.” – jannexees

“Free.” – storyexploratory

A fighter.

“Wanna be curly but wavy to frizzy on it’s best day. Can’t make up its mind but has a mind if it’s own until I bring out the straightener and we duke it out. The heat always wins!!” – tiazoom

“A natural flow with some wave.” – lidi83

Long and strong with the power and beauty passed onto to me by my ancestors.” – bri_g16

The indicator of my many moods lol depending on how I have it represents my mood of the day.” – jenivy09

Full of Vida is our favorite way to describe it.

“Wavy and full of vida.” – misdaisy

And we can’t help but tear up a little bit over this description as a protector.

It’s my protector, lays long as rapunzels in the stories, part of my identity and soars as the birds in skies and as blessed as God made me. HAPPY WARRIOR WEDNESDAY MIS GUERRERAS AND SISTERS! BLESSINGS ON THIS RISING!” – brightdollface

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Women Are Speaking Out About What Changed Their Minds About Abortion

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Women Are Speaking Out About What Changed Their Minds About Abortion

Mark Reinstein / Getty

With so much at stake this election year, it’s important to understand the circumstances behind some of our biggest beliefs. Currently there are little questions as to whether Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is in opposition to a person’s right to abortion. Her Catholic faith, her academic writing, and accounts from friends affirm that she has opposes the medical procedure. During a 2017 confirmation hearing for her current position as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in Chicago, Coney Barret stated that she was bound to follow the Roe decision as an appeals court judge stating “Roe has been affirmed many times and survived many challenges in the court… And it’s more than 40 years old, and it’s clearly binding on all courts of appeals. And so it’s not open to me or up to me, and I would have no interest in, as a court of appeals judge, challenging that precedent.”

There’s likely no chance of changing her mind, but we were curious about how women felt.

A recent post on Reddit posed the question: What changed your mind on abortion?

Check out the answers below!

“Being pregnant (with a very much wanted baby). I’ve always been pro choice, but learning about how much can go wrong in a pregnancy made it very apparent abortion is far from a black and white issue. For example, say the fetus has some defect where it can be carried to term, but will 100% die shortly after birth. There is no reason the mother should be forced to carry out the whole pregnancy. There are so many other nuances like this that are not possible to legislate.” – kittyinparis

“having one myself. i was religious, orthodox christian once upon a time. i hate to be one of those people who didn’t understand something until i experienced it myself but it is what it was. i extremely naive and ignorant because i thought that it was as simple as “don’t get pregnant if you don’t want a kid”. but it’s really not. and you never know what someone’s story is. and even then, regardless of their situation i think if someone doesn’t want to be pregnant it’s immoral to force them to be.” – Reddit user

“Honestly? Biology class. They went over sexual reproduction step by step and I just couldn’t buy the whole “humanity begins at conception” thing anymore. Then I started reading what all those scary buzzwords meant and I got a bit pissed off. Turns out the evil “partial-birth abortions” are usually called D&Es and they’re usually only done to babies with no chance of survival or in the cases of miscarriages. That’s not evil. That’s sad. I felt lied to, in a big way.” – Moritani

“I learned more about the concepts of bodily autonomy and consent and decided that it’s wrong to force people to remain pregnant against their will.” – enerjem

“When I first learned about the concept it seemed like a terrible thing but even after just 20 minutes of research (I did a lot more clearly, but this is just to emphasize how simple this decision was) I became pro-choice at 14ish, and I’ve had that stance ever since. So I only barely changed my mind really, but I think it counts because without looking into it I could’ve gone on believing it to be morally repugnant just because of what it sounds like and because it’s a subject that’s so easy to get carried away on and not look at objectively.” – ypical_Humanoid

“Paying my own bills. It’s a lot harder to feed two mouths than one.” – Reddit user

“Having kids. Pre-kids i was very prolife. Went to rallys and everything. Would have stressed and felt guilty if i got pregnant and dont knownwhat i would have chosen though. 4 kids later and several oops…im very pro choice.” – Strikingachord

“I was pro-life until I was about 13. I figure my brain developed more and I was then better able to see the issue in a more global and expansive way and determined that pro-choice was the most ethical stance.” – searedscallops

“Meeting someone in college who had had one in the past, and who spoke openly about it. She didn’t regret it or torture herself with guilt and shame over it, but she wasn’t a depraved monster, either. She was a wonderful person who did what was best for herself and her situation.” –coffeeblossom

“Having to get one myself.” –aj4ever

“I don’t know that I was ever pro-life in the same way I don’t think I was ever really Christian. I grew up in an Evangelical Protestant denomination, and until about middle school I mostly parroted things I heard. Things like “hate the sin love the sinner” for anything from being gay to probably having an abortion.

Sometime around middle school I started questioning all of it, forming my own opinions on things. I landed on atheist pro-choice feminist and have stayed there since.” – DejaBlonde

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Latinas Are Offering Advice To Undocumented Women, New Moms And Those Who Are Struggling On How To Receive Affordable Therapy

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Latinas Are Offering Advice To Undocumented Women, New Moms And Those Who Are Struggling On How To Receive Affordable Therapy

ClassicStock / Getty

Finding the best psychologist or mental health worker for you isn’t an easy feat.

For one, finding someone you feel you can trust enough to open up to about your insecurities and inner turmoils is hard enough but finding someone who is covered by your health insurance can be even more difficult. On top of that, factors like location and time often come into play. Women of color in particular face a certain type of challenge when it comes to mental health care. According to the American Psychological Association, just 5.3% of psychologists in the United States are Black. Eighty-three percent are white. This means finding a mental health provider who can connect with your personal experiences can be beyond difficult.

We asked our users on Fierce for mental health provider tips and received some pretty inciteful answers.

Check them out below!


“Ask about sliding scales (cost based on income), check with insurance provider, apply for government-funded health care benefits, seek support from your child’s school—can refer you to a provider, college students can ask about on-campus services, workplace can also direct you to resources. Being resourceful is so important especially when it comes to our well-being. Hope this helps.” –karinalizlu

“Just started BetterHelp and they offer financial assistance. Got matched with the first therapist that I actually like after 10 years of trying. Highly recommend!”-marilynscarlet

“Ask your HR department if they have an Employment Assistance Program. If they do it means that the employer covers a certain amount of sessions with a therapist, counselor, psychologist, etc. which means you pay nothing for those first few sessions. Some EAP’s also cover the first meeting with financial advisors, lawyers & a bunch of other things!”- dee_anes

“I agree! So many times I’ve needed therapy but I couldn’t afford it. I’ve had to use what I got.” –ladinesphotographypage

“TherapyForBlackGirls.com has a great directory for BIPOC and POC!”-eileen.the.machine

“BetterHelp and SimplePractice are remote licensed therapist that offer sliding scale as low as $75 a session.”-rocio_rami5
“Some insurances are covering copays on sessions because of the pandemic! Check with your insurance!”- b_diaz990

“If your insurance includes Teledoc, each therapy session is $5 out of pocket. Yes it’s virtual, but everything else is right now! I truly appreciate my therapist and I’m grateful it’s not $40 a session like it used to be.”- livsimplyfl

“BetterHelp offers financial assistance.” –yessikahwamiwez

“Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is a good nationwide starting point: https://www.samhsa.gov.” – karinalizlu

“Check healingconnections-Therapy.com/blog. I’m a therapist and wrote a post on the accessibility of therapy. There’s therapy for every price point!” – gyera19

“Yes!!! 1000%. Many community colleges and universities have resources as part of student services. You can start there if you’re a student. Or reach out to a local therapist and ask if they know of local low cost options.” –runeatrepeat

“Federally qualified health care centers many times they offer counseling on a sliding fee scale!” –amor805

“If in Cali: reach out to Department of Mental Health. (DMH). If your child is under the age of 15 they can provide respite services. This is to help get a diagnosis or help families who have a child with a diagnosis.”- 143kimberly

“Hello! I am a graduate counseling student about to have my M.Ed in professional mental health counseling. Some long time friends and I have started a small business, and we’d love you to follow us along on our journey as well!” –mindful_resolutions4u

“We are Mindful Resolutions, a holistic wellness company that creates affordable courses based on the 8 dimensional model of wellness! Our goal is to bring wellness/mental health education and coping skills to people who wouldn’t normally be able to access or afford therapy, or for those who want an additional resource. A course is only $49.99 compared to $80 or more for an average therapy session!”- Mindful Resolutions


“Open season is coming up! Time to review your healthcare costs and make sure your insurance meets your needs. If there are barriers to preventing you from affording health insurance, check out state or local Medicaid and ACÁ options.” –brittsticks

@openpathpsychotherapy has sessions from $30-$60 and a wide selection of therapists that you can select based on their intersections (race, gender, etc) and what they specialize in.” –gangstahippie04


@backtalkservices has been a great resource for providing BIPOC LGBTQ folx with therapy.”- tytanjames

@openpathpsychotherapy one time membership fee then you can see a therapist for less than $60 a session. However much you and the therapist agree to. Highly recommend!” –mssantoyo

“Check out Therapists on @openpathpsychotherapy1w.” –therapy.girl

“For essential workers in California, therapy is being provided for free through www.covid19counselingca.com. @latinxtherapy is offering free therapy to farm workers and janitorial workers currently working in hospital settings anywhere in the US. And finally, for all others, @openpathpsychotherapy offers low cost therapy throughout the US.” –julimuli246

@contigo_wellness Nonprofit created to help make therapy more accessible!” –angelrod8032

@fiercebymitu we host free virtual Pranic Healing nights every Tuesday from 7:30pm to 10pm. The participant will enjoy twenty five minutes of energy healing focused on reducing stress, anxiety and tension. Please dm me for more info.”-marcelaarrietaofficial

@marinalcsw if you have any recommendations.”- leeladm

@therapyforlatinx has an incredible database of therapists!”- diosa_yesi

“Free therapy for undocumented youth through @immigrantsrising1w.” –yessbianca

“Affordable mental health care is important, but what about the wait times? My mother tried to get therapy but had to wait 6months before getting a session. This was BEFORE the pandemic. When affordable is important, so is wait time.”- hannibelle_

@fiercebymitu Cannabis can be used to check in and get a mental break. @calibueno.co we bring clean cannabis to diverse communities in the SF Bays area.” –calibueno.co

“If you’re in austin, tx there is sliding scale therapy and psychiatric care they austin Travis county integral care.” –ernipie

“National Sexual Assault/Domestic Violence Hotlines like 1-800-656-4673 (HOPE) can connect Survivors with local centers that offer many services—some include therapists and psychiatrists for medication, as well.” –godwasawoman

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com