Fierce

Here Are The 2021 Fashion And Style Goals To Expect

Funny to think that around this time last year so many of us were all eagerly pouring over the Spring and Summer fashion lines in anticipation of what to wear. So young and naive. So far away from the world of COVID and quarantine and sweat pants. And this year it shows! In 2021, designers have turned out lines inspired by our new work-from-home routine. Here are some 2021 Fashion And Style Goals. You must follow

It’s not just designers aiming for WFH safe fashion.

Redditors also have their minds filled with fashion on their mind.

Check them out below!

“My goal is to only buy pieces I actually love. No shopping because I’m sad or bored. Secondary goal is to donate or throw away things that I don’t wear. Some clothes is super old and only holds up as pyjamas, some clothes is just …not me anymore, idk? Also learning about how to care for expensive pieces!” –friendlyRaven98

“Learn how to dress a body that is 90 pounds lighter. I’ve never shopped in straight sized stores and I don’t even know what brands I’d like. Up until now I’ve been forced to make do with what was available at torrid, lane Bryant, etc. and always felt pigeon holed into a certain “style” because that’s all that was available or thats what was expected for plus size people to wear.” – threeswordstyle

“2021 I’m making an effort. I can be a middle-aged mom, and not be frumpy. 2020 I started out fine, but working from home and covid I sort of gave up. I stopped doing my hair, and stopped putting on makeup. I stopped exercising (yoga pants and hoodies are so forgiving. Not to mention sports bras and cotton undies rather than sexy lingerie that made me stand up a little bit straighter and smile that secret smile to myself. ) I can be chubbier than I’d like right now, and still have nice style that makes me feel sexy and attractive and good about how I present myself. I can wear cute shoes and accessorize again, even if I have a mask that covers my smile. I can also take care of myself and enjoy exercise and healthy foods, and get to a place where I feel better about my body in a swimsuit.” –LittleBunnyF00f

“I decluttered A LOT this year , several garbage bags full of clothes I don’t wear / don’t like wearing , so my goal is to do a slow but carefully thought out overhaul. I’m going to start with super basic pieces and replacing my jeans for higher quality ones then move from there. This is likely going to take place in the second half of the year though because I’m currently paying off credit cards, so we’ll see!” –Sweatypotatosack

“My style goals for 2021:

  1. Be more creative with my style. I want to wear my more funky and unique pieces more often, and to make some of my pieces more personal by embroidering them with cool designs.
  2. Shop my closet. I probably have about 60 pieces all together including accessories (I know this from my Stylebook app) and I’ve realized that I can combine them in all sorts of new ways to create many different kinds of outfits.
  3. Take videos of my crafted outfits. This has helped me a lot in seeing what is working on me and what needs a few tweaks. For example, I took a video of myself wearing a tucked in fitted turtleneck with high-waisted jeans and a belt. I felt it looked very nice in the mirror, but for some reason, it looked off in the video. I quickly realized that due to my height, my high-rise jeans weren’t hitting me at my natural waist, but were instead fitting closer to a mid rise. After noticing this, I experimented around with what I had, and settled on adding a unique 80’s jacket which made it look a lot more styled and proportionate.” –AppleGirl341

“I’m going on a super low buy for 2021. There’s a chance that I have to move at the end of the year so I want to pair down my stuff (less boxes to pack). I’m allowed one item per month in the following categories (with exceptions carved out). This is one item PERIOD, not one shirt and one lipstick. I can either get the shirt or the lipstick. Makeup, clothing (including bras, underwear, and socks), accessories, shoes (can replace only worn out athletic shoes), tech including headphones/charging cables (can replace my laptop or phone should they die), books, craft supplies (unless I get a custom Etsy order and need something for it), stationary/office supplies (I can only buy a 2022 planner). I’m really trying to fast-track the “financial goals’ portion of my budget and I’m hoping this low-buy shifts my habits and diverts money from “wants” to financial goals.” –crazycatlady331

“I’m pretty much always torn between different aesthetics and I don’t really see that changing, but I definitely only want to buy things that I 100% like and that fit me. I usually thrift and I have some items that are lovely, but just one or two sizes too big, I’ll keep them and wear them with belts or get them altered, but I don’t wanna keep buying things that are pretty, but not my size.” –kirisakis

“My realistic goal is to not shop new at all and really limit shopping secondhand. I’m going to not shop when bored or stressed (not too hard to do, since I’m not really going out at the moment due to covid, obviously, and online shopping doesn’t give me the same boost). I almost set a no-buy for myself, but I know myself well enough to know that if I slip once, I’ll consider the whole thing a wash and go crazy. So I’m “allowing” second hand purchases, but I really intend to try and limit even those. Dream goal is to take sewing lessons and learn how to make my own clothes. I realize I need actual in-person help with this, as I’ve tried youtube and other online tutorials and I just can’t. I need to be able to ask questions and get feedback. So if things get better, I’m looking at this summer finding a class or teacher to start. This has been like a fifteen year goal, though. I am somehow making it happen in 2021!!” –violetmemphisblue

“Contrary to others I’m actually trying to buy more! I’ve always been super picky with my clothes and have had a barebones wardrobe since high school. This is the first time I’ve had a job where I have a lot of freedom in what I can wear, and it just feels like I’m wearing the same stuff all the time (I am).” –toa2tcat

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11 Books By Latinas Coming In 2021 That We Are Stoked About

Fierce

11 Books By Latinas Coming In 2021 That We Are Stoked About

The new year has arrived, and it’s stacked with a batch of new books for readers to devour. 

While good reads might not heal us from the pains and losses of 2020 or save us from the uncertainties that remain ahead in 2021, being able to take a break from reality through literary fantasy or illuminating nonfiction can be gratifying (and healthy!).

For those searching for titles to pre-order among the abundance of new works expected in 2021, we have you covered. From debuts by some of our generation’s most brilliant thinkers to anticipated novels you’ll get through in one sitting, here are some exciting books by Latinas and Latinxs you’ll want to add to your reading list.

1. One of the Good Ones by Maika Moulite and Maritza Moulite (January 5, 2021)

The highly anticipated novel One of the Good Ones, by Hatian-American sisters Maika Moulite and Maritza Moulite, is a timely read about a teenage activist who is killed under mysterious circumstances after attending a social justice rally and the family that is left reeling after his death. Tackling police violence and sisterhood, the book, published by Inkyard Press on January 5, explores the impact of racism, prejudice and allyship.

2. We Are Here: Visionaries of Color Transforming the Art World by Jasmin Hernandez (February 2, 2021)

In We Are Here: Visionaries of Color Transforming the Art World, Dominican-American Jasmin Hernandez profiles 50 artists and art entrepreneurs of color who are challenging the status quo in the art world. Hernandez, founder of Gallery Gurls, interviews queer, Black and brown visionaries influencing communities from New York to Los Angeles, talking with them about their creative process and how they are creating a radically inclusive world across the entire art ecosystem. The book, which features stunning portraits of each artist, will publish on February 2.

3. Fat Chance, Charlie Vega by Crystal Maldonado (February 2, 2021)

Puerto Rican author Crystal Maldonado’s Fat Chance, Charlie Vega is an exciting new addition to YA. The coming-of-age novel centers on a fat Latina girl living in a fatphobic white Connecticut suburb. Her mom wants her to lose weight. Society doesn’t love her brown skin. And her crush might be into her best friend. The book, which will be published by Penguin Random House on February 2, has been described as funny, charming and raw. 

4. Infinite Country by Patricia Engel (February 23, 2021)

Patricia Engel’s Infinite Country is a novel about a divided Colombian family. The book, which has been called “powerful” and “breathtaking,” tells the tale of Talia, a teen being held at a correctional facility for adolescent girls in Colombia, and a U.S.-based family fighting to be reunited with her. The novel, which will hit bookshelves on February 23, deals with yearning, family, belonging and sacrifice. 

5. What’s Mine and Yours by Naima Coster (March 2, 2021)

Naima Coster, the Afro-Dominican author of Halsey Street, has another anticipated novel in What’s Mine and Yours. The book, dealing with issues of race, identity, family and legacy, centers on two families, one Black and one white, and how their lives become integrated and messy when a county initiative draws students from a largely Black town into predominantly white high schools. The book, set to publish by Grand Central Publishing on March 2, covers a span of 20 years, and it explores the ways families break apart and come back together.

6. The Soul of a Woman by Isabel Allende (March 2, 2021)

Award-winning author Isabel Allende returns in 2021 with The Soul of a Woman, a reflection on feminism, power and family rooted in the Chilean writer’s upbringing and experiences. The autobiographical work seeks to answer the question: What feeds the soul of feminists – and all women – today? For her, it’s safety, value, peace, resources, connection, autonomy and love, but these battles haven’t all yet been won. The inspirational read, which will be published by Ballantine Books on March 2, aims to ignite a fire in younger generations to continue to carry the work of feminism forward.

7. The Mirror Season by Anna-Marie McLemore (March 16, 2021)

In Mexican-American author Anna-Marie McLemore’s latest piece of YA magical realism, The Mirror Season, they tell the story of a young girl, Graciela, and boy, Lock, who were both assaulted at the same party. When Lock appears at Graciela’s school, she realizes he has no idea what happened to them. The pair develop a cautious friendship through her family’s possibly-magical pastelería, but Graciela, hoping to keep them both safe, hides the truth from her new friend – a secret that could tear them apart. The Mirror Season will be available at book shops on March 16.

8. Of Women and Salt by Gabriela Garcia (March 31, 2021)

Cuban-Mexican author Gabriela Garcia’s debut Of Women and Salt, slated to release on March 31, has already got a lot of people excited. The novel takes place in present-day Miami, where Jeanette, who is battling addiction, seeks to learn more about her family history from her Cuban mother, Carmen, who is still wrestling with her own trauma of displacement. Hungry to understand, Jeanette travels to Cuba, where conversations with her grandmother force her to reckon with secrets from the past.

9. Dear Woke Brown Girl by Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez (March 2021)

Nashville-based Nicaraguan writer and speaker Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez is among the most brilliant Latina thinkers of our generation. In Dear Woke Brown Girl, a forthcoming book inspired by a 2016 essay of the same title, the founder of Latina Rebels explores the inequalities of race, class and gender, discussing issues of code-switching, colorism, intersectional feminism, decolonization and more. The book, which will be published by Seal Press, is expected to hit bookstores in March.

10. When We Make It by Elisabet Velasquez (Fall 2021)

Nuyorican poet and author Elisabet Velasquez’s YA debut When We Make It is a timely novel-in-verse that explores mental health, the war on drugs, gentrification, poverty and racism. Set in 1990s Bushwick, Brooklyn, the novel centers on Sarai, a first-generation Puerto Rican eighth-grader, who navigates the strain of mental illness, family trauma, toxic masculinity and housing insecurity while living with determination and love. When We Make It, published by Penguin Random House and expected to release in the fall, is a love letter to girls of color who were made to believe they would never make it.

11. Dreaming of You by Melissa Lozada-Oliva (Fall 2021)

Colombian-Guatemalan poet and author Melissa Lozada-Oliva’s Dreaming of You is a genre-bending verse novel about a young Latinx poet grappling with loneliness and heartache. The novel, which sees the teen bringing the Queen of Tejano Music Selena Quintanilla back to life through a seance, is an uncanny tale that interrogates Latinx identity, womanhood, obsession, disillusion and what it means to be seen. The book, coming from Astra House, is set to publish in the fall.

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Fans Think This Photo Of Barbie Is Proof She’s An Out And Proud Lesbian

Entertainment

Fans Think This Photo Of Barbie Is Proof She’s An Out And Proud Lesbian

Mattel/ Instagram

The fact that the early days of Barbie were not quite so inclusive to all of us comes as no surprise. The blonde, impossibly figured doll with a penchant for similar-looking friends is a far cry away from the Barbie of today who has friends of all shapes, races, sizes, sexual identities, and abilities. Even better, today’s Barbie crew includes dolls who give queer children a broader playgound for their imagination.

Recently, Barbie has added a new addition to her friend group whose bringing more power to her LGTBQ fans.

Social media has dubbed the LGBTQ positive Aimee Song doll Barbie‘s girlfriend.

Twitter’s latest excitement is about a theory that Barbie and Aimee Song are dating. Photos of Mattel’s doll Aimee Song doll show her wearing a “Love Wins” T-shirt that supports LGBTQ+ rights. The Mattel doll was inspired by fashion blogger Aimee Song and recently caught renewed attention in a viral post shared to Twitter.

The “Love Wins” photos are only now going viral but were actually released in November 2017.

The photos of Barbie and the Aimee doll were shared to Twitter last Monday by user @kissevermore and now has Twitter debating whether the two are dating.

The pictures of Barbie and Aimee show the two dolls eating avocado toast. petting a dog, and smiling at each other. The images have fans questioning when Barbie came out and how she managed to nail a hot girlfriend before they did.

Even REAL Aimee Song weighed in on the images to confirm the relationship.

“I am the girlfriend,” she tweeted with a photo of herself and the Aimee Song doll. 

While Mattel has yet to officially identify Barbie as a lesbian, the original Instagram posts related to the Love Wins Barbies are proof that she is at least an ally.

Confirmed or not, true or not, one of the best parts of Barbie is that she is meant to be whoever her fans want her to be.

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