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Eco-Friendly Period Products That Will Save You Money In The Long Run

It’s expensive being a woman with a period.

On average, women menstruate from age 13 to age 51 which means the average woman has over 456 total periods over a course of nearly 40 years. According to research conducted by San Francisco State University, 2,280 days of a woman’s life is spent on her period. Or, 6.25 years of her life. While there are other options, nearly 70 percent of women use tampons during their periods. SFSU states that as women are instructed to change their tampons every 4 to 8 hours, with 6 hours being the average and a box containing 36 tampons costing $7 at a Pharmacy, women spend $1,773.33 in a lifetime on tampons (that’s if that price of tampons stays the same). That’s a pretty big chunk of change but…

Here’s the thing, to some people that might not be a lot of savings in a lifetime, but what about in terms of the environment? Traditional pads and tampons are typically made of plastic, rayon, and toxic chemicals like bleach which fill topple landfills and clog sewers. Each year, 20 billion menstrual products are ultimately dropped in North American landfills. With the average woman throwing away 250 to 300 pounds of “pads, plugs, and applicators” in her lifetime, that’s a heck lot of space on our planet to be taking up.

Fortunately, that can be saved. From cotton pads to menstrual cups there all kinds of comfortable, affordable, and easy ways to save the planet with your period alone. Check them out!

Cloth Pads

Sea-Sponge Tampons

Padded Panties

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Menstrual Cups

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𝐘𝐦𝐩ä𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭ö𝐲𝐬𝐭ä𝐯ä𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐭 𝐤𝐮𝐮𝐤𝐚𝐮𝐭𝐢𝐬𝐞𝐭.⁣⁣⁣ *𝘺𝘩𝘵𝘦𝘪𝘴𝘵𝘺ö 𝘱𝘰𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘶𝘴 @nomaicup 𝘬𝘢𝘯𝘴𝘴𝘢*⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ Vuonna 2018 pelkästään Yhdysvalloissa ostettiin 𝟓.𝟖 𝐦𝐢𝐥𝐣𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐢𝐚 tampoonia (𝘭ä𝘩𝘥𝘦 𝘕𝘢𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯𝘢𝘭 𝘎𝘦𝘰𝘨𝘳𝘢𝘱𝘩𝘪𝘤.) Voitte siis vain kuvitella miltä luku näyttää kaikki maailman tampoonit ynnättynä. Tähän lisätään vielä kuukautissiteet ja jätevuori on valmis.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ Suurin osa myytävistä siteistä sekä tamponeista on kierrätys kelvottomia, ja osa näistä päätyy myös kaatopaikan sijaan viemäristöön ja sitä kautta mereen sekä rannoillemme.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ Meille markkinoidaan murros-iästä alkaen erilaisia kertakäyttöisiä siteitä sekä tampooneja eikä juurikaan kerrota kestävistä vaihtoehdoista.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ Mutta entä jos kuukautiset voisivat olla ympäristöystävällisemmät sekä samalla edullisemmat?⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ Kuukuppi on monelle vielä tuntematon kuukautistuote, mutta ympäristön kannalta erittäin oleellinen. Itselläni on ollut kuukuppi jo vuoden verran käytössä ja voin sanoa, että paluuta siteisiin ei enää ole.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ Yksi kuukuppeja valmistava yritys on suomalainen 𝐍𝐨𝐦𝐚𝐢, joiden kuukupit ovat tehty 100% lääketieteellisestä silikonista ja näin ollen ne sopivat myös lateksi allergikoille. Tuotteet ovat kotimaisia ja valmistus tapahtuu Sastamalassa.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ Yhden kuukupin hinta on 29,90€ ja koko vaihtoehtoja on kolme: S, M ja L. Ne ovat suunniteltu eri tarpeisiin ja tietoa kupeista löytyy yrityksen sivuilta.⁣⁣⁣ ⁣ Itse valitsin koot S ja M. Kupit ovat helppo asettaa sisälle ja oikein laitettuna ne eivät tunnu miltään. Kuppien mukana tulee myös kätevä pussi, jonka avulla kuljetat kuppia helposti mukanasi.⁣ ⁣⁣⁣ Kuukuppi voi tuntua hintavalta verrattuna siteisiin ja tamponeihin, mutta tiesitkö, että oikein käytettynä yksi kuukuppi voi kestää jopa 10 vuotta käytössä? Siitä voit siis laskea kuinka paljon rahaa säästät, puhumattakaan kuinka paljon vähemmän roskaa tuotat.⁣⁣ ⁣ Suosittelen siis vahvasti kokeilemaan kuukuppia.⁣ ⁣⁣ #nomaicup #menstrualcups #periods #zerowaste #zerowasteliving #sustainablelife #zerowasteswaps #zerowastebathroom #kotimaisuus #kotimainen #kuukautiset #ecofriendly #plasticfreeoceans #ecohome #ekokoti #sustainableswaps

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There’s A New Kit For Your PreTeen’s First Period That Will Make Talking About It Way Less Taboo

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There’s A New Kit For Your PreTeen’s First Period That Will Make Talking About It Way Less Taboo

Cameron Schiltz / Getty Images

Everyone remembers getting their first period. Whether you were at a friend’s sleepover, riding your bike or sitting in math class, it’s a moment straight out of a teen novel that forever alters your life. A reminder of what your body is capable of, it’s a marker of growing up—and if you haven’t been prepared for what’s involved, it can be a daunting experience.

But, thankfully, today there are so many resources out there to help make that experience easier for the teen getting her first period and for the parents who get to explain all these changes.

The new kit for her first period helps teens embrace their periods.

Getting your first period is a milestone in a woman’s life but thanks to our patriarchal society it’s long been considered a taboo. And, as a result, young girls and women are left suffering to figure it out on their own.

Thankfully, there are new companies out there working to make menstrual education the norm and they’re determined to provide knowledge and supplies to teens who are just starting to menstruate – especially if they’re from underrepresented communities. They’re working to set up the next gen of people who menstruate with better access to products and information so they can feel confident while navigating their bodies’ natural changes.

“We’re dedicated to encouraging families to openly communicate about period and puberty education,” Crystal Etienne, founder of Ruby Love, told POPSUGAR. “We launched our bestselling first-period kits that include educational materials that challenge common misconceptions about puberty and equip teens with the tools they need to embrace their periods.”

Products like these are so important since a woman’s period has major impacts on her life.

A lot of people learn about menstruation and proper period care after having their first period, sometimes even years later. This has a huge impact on access to period care products and education and takes its toll on society as a whole.

For instance, in North America, up to 70 per cent of girls and women have missed school or work because of their period, according to research by UNESCO. Then there’s the very serious issue of health effects. At least one study found that Black women are three times more likely to experience more severe period symptoms than white women, thanks to noncancerous growths in the uterus that can cause heavy periods.

“While the first period talk is an important introduction to puberty, the topic still remains taboo in many families,” Crystal explained to POPSUGAR.

“This can especially be true in minority groups who have traditionally been left out of the conversation due to stigmas surrounding the topic. As a mother, I know how important it is to have a menstrual-care option that is safe, easy to use, and helps celebrate a young girl’s growth. Discussing menstruation as a monumental rite of passage and making her first period experience as positive as possible influences how a young girl views menstruation,” she added.

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There Are Literally No Tampons Available In Mexico City Since They Were Banned For Environmental Reasons

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There Are Literally No Tampons Available In Mexico City Since They Were Banned For Environmental Reasons

Igor Golovniov/SOPA Images via Getty Images

Few people would argue against the fact that tampons are 100% absolutely an essential item. In fact, many governments are trying to make tampons (among other feminine care products) more accessible to women by offering them for free or low-cost.

However, Mexico’s capital city has taken a different approach by outright banning the sale of tampons. The move comes as a second part to Mexico City’s recent ban on single use products for environmental reasons. And although many are applauding the city for taking drastic action to curb the use of wasteful products, many critics point out that the government should of provided alternatives for women.

Mexico City has banned tampons as part of its ban on single use products.

As of this week, it has become impossible to find tampons in any part of Mexico City’s bustling metropolis. The city that’s home to more than 20 million people no longer sales the single-use plastic tampons that so many women have come to rely on.

The ban comes as a result of the ban on single-use plastics that took effect January 1. The newspaper Milenio reported that it was unable to locate the feminine care products anywhere in the capital but noted that they are widely available in neighboring México state, where disposable plastics remain legal.

Mexico City Environment Minister Mariana Robles asserted in January that single-use plastics, among which are disposable cutlery, cups and straws – and tampons with plastic applicators – are “not really essential.”

Alessandra Rojo de la Vega, a Mexico City lawmaker with the Green Party, said that menstrual cups are an “excellent alternative” to tampons, adding that they are environmentally friendly.

“Let’s incentivize their use to reduce contamination,” she said, asserting that the government should distribute them to women free of charge. But those on Twitter had no patience for lawmakers telling women what menstrual products they should and shouldn’t use.

The city’s environmental minister has argued that single-use plastic tampons aren’t really essential.

Despite officials saying that single-use tampons aren’t really essential, many women across the capital clearly disagreed with the “nonessential” classification and have taken to social media to voice their opposition to their prohibition.

“Stop legislating with privilege, tampons are essential products,” one Twitter user said in a post directed to Mexico City Mayor Claudia Sheinbaum.

“Suggesting the use of a menstrual cup is not the solution,” Twitter user Miss Maple said in a post directed to Mayor Sheinbaum and the Mexico City government.

“I can’t believe how idiotic we are in Mexico,” tweeted Daniela García, a journalist in Nuevo León, above a link to a news report on the absence of tampons on the shelves of Mexico City stores.

“As if women didn’t [already] confront all kinds of problems, now the government imposes a new one on them – no tampons,” tweeted Carlos Elizondo, an academic at the Tec de Monterrey university.

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