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Brujas On Instagram Are Filling Your Feed With Spiritual Guidance And A Place To Relax

This story was updated on April 14, 2020.

Most Latinas were raised to quiver at just the mention of the word brujería. Many of us were taught that it was evil, a wild, crazy and ungodly practice that ensured our entry into the fiery gates of hell. But as the modern Latina embraces intersectional feminism, and its ideas of self-love and decolonization, many have found a heroine in the bruja foremother whose traditions were demonized because they could not be controlled.

Finding power and strength in natural healing, spiritual wellness and ancestral knowledge, a growing number of Latinas are reclaiming brujería and creating spaces online for education, health-giving and straight magia. Culture makers like Princess Nokia and Nitty Scott incorporate it into their music, platforms like La Brujas Club and Bruja Tip support those on their spiritual journeys and shops like Curandera Press and Brooklyn Brujeria sell goodies for the proud bruja.

Whether you’re just curious or are actively seeking mystical empowerment, here are some brujas who can teach you more about magia.

1. Tatianna Tarot

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🌴 B•L•O•O•M•I•N•G 🌴 📿: @peaceimagesjewelry 📷Magick: @bynikkig #evolution

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Tatianna Morales, more popularly known as Tatianna Tarot, is an intuitive tarot specialist, medium and ritual practitioner who uses her Instagram feed to share readings, inspiring messages and fun witchy memes. The New Orleans-based puertorriqueña’s approach to divination is highly accessible, and she has curated a profile that is as impassioned and encouraging as it is vibrant and beautiful.

Join her Virtual Spiritist Prayer Circle on Friday, April 17th from 9:30pm ct / 10:30pm

The virtual gathering helps participants elevate their ancestor and spirit communication. Expect prayers and messages and a ton of beautiful vibes.

2. La Loba Loca

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Feliz dia de las brujas! To all the femme + womxn that stay loving the earth, soil, water, air, non-human-beings, their communities and themselves fiercely. I am a flower bush in between elder and bladderpod flowers 🌺 thankful for all the resilient and rebellious spirits of muxer and femme brujas ancestors burned on the stake, killed by the heteropatriarchy, silenced by the church… we can never burn because we are 🔥! I got a 15% off my online store lalobaloca.bigcartel.com code:bruja + today is the last day to register for RADICALLY AND CONSCIOUSLY MENSTRUATING ONLINE COURSE (link in bio) + if you want extra perks and support this flower elf become my $$ supporter at Patreon.com/lalobaloca 👽 If you party today, don't forget to soltar un aullido or pour some water to the earth for all the so-called brujas, the hxstorians, the gardeners, the seed keepers, the midwives, the gaslighted bitches, the survivors that speak up and are not believed, the survivors that do magic w/o disclosing their experiences, the medicine makers, the mothers being nurse and doctor, the soil workers, the curanderas, the disposed, the care takers… all our ancestors whose magic organized religion, cisheteropatriarchy, white supremacy and capitalism tried to destroy and didn't. I sent this photo to my mom, tias, primas y abuelas today because it has been all their femme magic and labor that got me here. It has always been femme labor and brujeria feminista that makes this world go around. ALWAYS. #medicinafeminista #brujeríafeminista

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La Loba Loca is a queer yerbetera, seed-saver and doula. The Los Angeles-based perunx often shares tips on herbalism, plant relations, social justice, healing justice and autonomous health. Loba also provides positive messages on their Insta, home remedies and promotions for classes, consultations and items like moon pads and bruja feminist gear.

Eclass on April 18 for tending to your garden.

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Check my new e-class and sign up LINK IN BIO, the recording will be available and the early bird sliding scale starts at $18! This knowledge share is for those people interested on learning about starting a garden and keeping a garden using simple and accesible tools. I am going to share with you how I started gardening and how I have turned super sad LA city soil into a vibrant community of plants and microorganisms. I call my garden a "chacra", that is how we call the spaces we cultivate and love on back home in Arequipa. I come from a long line of soil workers, Abuelita seed savers and tias that love on their gardens like each plant was their wawita/baby. I have fallen in love with plants and gardens and I want to share that with you! In this knowledge share we will be focusing on: -the garden as a physical and spiritual space… also as a political space! -building soil and ways to do simple composting and repurposing food and waste to feed soil -how to grow directly in soil (even if it is a small space) -how to grow in containers -basics on growing seeds, choOsing what pants to grow and how to keep them alive -focusing on fast growing plants and strategies to grow medicine and food during a pinchi pandemic that feels like the end of the world as we know it but also finding hope in the plants thriving around us! Join us 🌿link in bio🌿 first group to sign up gets in the run for seed packets💕 #abuelitaknowledge #garden #urbangarden #urbangardening #plantconnection #plant #queer #femme #herbalism

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This class is for people interested in learning about starting and maintaining a garden using simple and accessible tools. According to La Loba Loca she started gardening by turning “super sad LA city soil into a vibrant community of plants and microorganisms.”

3. The Hood Witch

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✨"TheHoodwitch.com is a website/store/blog and community that I had been working on for the last 4 years. It started as a play on words, with roots to a deeper meaning: a reference to the very real "hood witches", healers, curanderas, wise women, priestess, and most importantly my grandmothers. In Black and brown communities brujas were and have been the healers. They are the shoulders to cry on, they could give you a recipe to clear up your colds, bring love into your life, or offer protection. They are the beacons of light for their community and that has always inspired me, knowing that this magic is in my blood. Yesterday, I released my very first recorded interview for @wearemitu as the founder and visionary behind my brand, I've always stayed lowkey, because I wanted to be known for providing tools and not my appearance. In fact, most people have come to only know me for my signature stiletto nails & hand tattoos. I felt it was important more than ever now to show that I am a real person a strong Black & Mexican woman and to put a face to what I've created. The Hoodwitch has been such a source of inspiration for many and this experience has allowed me to explore my understandings deeper of metaphysics, folk medicine, and wellness in ways I never thought possible. I have always believed my purpose in this life was to share, uplift, support, and spread love to the world around me. (Read more below)

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True to her motto, The Hood Witch, also known as Bri Luna, offers everyday magic for the modern mystic. The part-Mexican, part-African American serves her nearly 200K followers by blessing them with self-love notes, self-care tips, hilarious bruja memes and a series of items for sale, like crystals, sage, themed tarot decks and books.

Daily reminders of your worth.

The Hoodwitch has no scheduled events for the Coronavirus quarantine from what we can tell BUT she has a whole heck of a lot of daily advice and hype up.

4. Chiquita Brujita

Chiquita Brujita is a Brooklyn-based fortune teller and bruja dancer. The Boricua’s Instagram is a revolutionary, feel-good, spiritual experience, with posts about liberation, dance — particularly the Afro-Puerto Rican bomba — as resistance and love, and her stunning self-made candles.

Get in on her Magic Mondays

Join Chiquita every Monday for the ultimate house party.

5. Indijam

Agnes Ito, known on the ‘gram as Indijam, is a spiritual mentor, alchemist and light worker whose Instagram will brighten your newsfeed with positive affirmations and bruja tips. A self-described “recovering undercover over-lover,” the Peruana-Filipina often posts about self-love and self-pleasure as well as protecting the heart while allowing it to love after heartbreak.

6. Indigemama

Panquetzani, known more commonly on the interwebs as Indigemama, is a holistic womb counselor, wellness coach and full spectrum doula who uses her Instagram account to share posts about ancestral healing and learning to trust one’s self. With her work primarily focused on reproductive health and motherhood, the Los Angeles-based folk healer also uses her account to educate followers on Mesoamerican womb care techniques.

Go loca with her daily affirmations

Indigemama wrote these affirmations while breastfeeding my babies in quarantine. She wrote them while talking her eldest son through a meltdown on week two of no play dates and while playing with her “joyful toddler who has no idea about the global pandemic and both the ugliness + profound cooperation it’s brought out in people.”

READ: Poetry’s Been Called An Outdated Pastime, But These Latinas Are Breathing New Life Into The Art

Let us know the brujas you love to follow in the comments!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Harvard-Bound Latina Daughter Of Undocumented Immigrants Accepted To Four Ivy League Schools

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Harvard-Bound Latina Daughter Of Undocumented Immigrants Accepted To Four Ivy League Schools

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With her family crowded around her computer, Santa Ana High School senior Stephany Gutiérrez anxiously checked the status of her college applications. Like most students, Gutiérrez had her heart settled on top schools but unlike so many, she was accepted into not one but four Ivy League colleges.

In an emotional video, Gutiérrez and her family react as they check the status of her admission to find that she was accepted into Columbia University, Brown, and Dartmouth.

Gutiérrez was recently accepted into Harvard, Brown, Dartmouth, and Columbia.

The daughter of undocumented immigrants and with dreams to become a pro-bono attorney, Gutiérrez was accepted into four of the five colleges she applied to. No surprise, she also got into her first choice, Harvard.

“It was difficult, my parents are still illegal immigrants here in the United States. Their support in particular has been excellent, my father and mother have always told me that education is the way to get ahead,” Gutiérrez explained in a recent interview with Univision.

In the video, Gutierrez reads off her acceptance status to each school to her extremely thrilled parents.

“I got in!” she can be heard saying of her acceptance to Columbia University and then the other Ivy League schools.

“It took like an hour or two for the news to settle in,” Gutierrez explained in an interview with CBS. “I was in disbelief. I was like, wait, actually, let me go back and read all of it, maybe I missed a part, but, yeah, it’s starting to settle in. It’s very exciting.”

Gutierrez’s mentor Gloria Montiel-Itzel, an alumna of both Santa Ana High School and Harvard, underlined in a recent interview that it takes more than good grades to get into Ivy League schools.

“I think it’s a commitment to something other than themselves,” she explained about Gutierrez and two other seniors (Oziel Flores and Cielo Echegoyen) in her class who were also recently accepted to Harvard. “And I think all three of them, in different ways, have really shown that they care more about their community, their school and making things better for others, and I think that’s something that Harvard really loves.”

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These Brooklynite Afro-Dominican Twins Are Unapologetically Reclaiming Brujería

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These Brooklynite Afro-Dominican Twins Are Unapologetically Reclaiming Brujería

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Brujería is practically second nature to Ph.D ‘Social Science Brujas‘ and yoginis, Dr. Griselda Rodriguez-Solomon and Dr. Miguelina Rodriguez. For the Afro-Dominican twins raised in Bushwick, Brooklyn in the ’80s, their spirituality emerged in their youth.

The twins were raised Catholic and watched their faith parallel the private rituals their mother practiced. Surrounded by altars and religious objects common of the 21 Divisions or Dominican Vudu, brujería seemed normal.

Yet, in the public eye openly claiming such practices were shunned.

“Unfortunately, that mystery is not because the practice itself is mysterious and dark; it’s because main society and religion has made it so that we have this fear of brujas, brujería, and santería,” Miguelina told Refinery29.

Known as the Brujas of Brooklyn, the twins sought to create a space dedicated to the solace of women of African descent further dismantling the harmful ties once associated with brujería.

Launched in 2016, Griselda and Miguelina work to normalize ancestral practices and heal generational trauma.

As scholars and professors at the City University of New York, they tackle conversations around gender, religion, race, and anti-blackness in the community through meditation.

“With Brujas of Brooklyn (like so many other platforms), we really create a space for Latinx people to explore what it means to be Latinx, and to understand that who we are doesn’t exist in a box,” Griselda told Bustle.

Syncretic traditions and rituals descendant from the Yoruba faith are a source of resilient strength in the face of historical brutality within the Latin American diaspora. Out of the 11.2 million Africans that survived the transatlantic slave trade, only 450,000 arrived in the United States. The rest were dispersed in the Caribbean, Central and South America.

Resistant to the cultural erasure, these spiritual practices have remained and expanded within the diaspora. Now a resurgence is evident.

Thanks to social media, spirituality and witchcraft have grown among millennials. Formerly, private practices have become mainstream as today’s brujas are working to unravel folk myths that have led to the miseducation of many.

You see them everywhere through astrologers, tarot readers, and holistic healers.

Brujas live their lives unapologetically and the twins are no exception.

Spirituality in Latin America is complex. Demonized by Christianity, the fear of brujería is also rooted in sexism.

“The word bruja for me, it’s very political… it has been demonized for so many years. And a lot of it, we’re starting to understand, is because women are inherently powerful people,” said Miguelina to Refinery29. “I think that when a woman taps into that power, she becomes so powerful, and the patriarchy is scared of that.”

In order to reclaim a practice, one must first decolonize the mind and spirit as well as empower the women that paved the way for witchcraft.

“The people that were considered witches in Western Europe, Africa, or Latin America, were curanderas, herbalists, midwives, doulas, astrologers. There are generations of women whose powers couldn’t manifest because those in power were afraid of us,” said Griselda for Bustle.

Like those that came before them, the twins are ‘womb-healers,’ aimed to heal the inherited intergenerational trauma, which disproportionately affects Black women.

In the United States, Black women historically have the highest maternal mortality rates. Due to health conditions and institutional racism within the healthcare system, in 2018 Black women were 2.5 times more likely to die from pregnancy-related complications.

Practicing Yoni, an ancient Sanskrit word for ‘vulva’, they tap perform an act called “woke womb work” in retreats and workshops. They also involve Kundalini yoga in their craft which involves chanting, breathing exercises, and poses meant to activate Shakti; spiritual energy located in the spine.

Both containing origins in Hinduism, the practice is tied to divine feminine energy.

With workshops serving up to 100 people, now virtually during the pandemic, the Brujas of Brooklyn having taken their practices to the public sphere. As they continue to work to revive a legacy robbed from them, in part due to anti-blackness, those that engage are discovering inner magic they never knew they had.

“Women have been reclaiming this word for generations,” Griselda shared to Bustle. “But we’re seeing it a lot more today because of social media, thank God. What better ancestor to reclaim than the witches who took no sh*t 700 years ago. We’re living through her in a new way.”

Read: More Mothers Are Hiring Doulas, But What Is A Doula? Here’s What You Need To Know

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