Fierce

Best Hack To Help You Stop Saying ‘Sorry’

Here’s a question: how often do you find yourself saying “sorry” too much?If you’ve ever found yourself apologizing for someone else’s behavior or approaching a receptionist at an office by saying: “I’m sorry to bother you but I have a question”… you might have an apology problem on your hands. Whether you’re people-pleasing, a perfectionist, feeling insecure, or just doing it unconsciously, over-apologizing is a bad habit that all women should learn to unlearn.

Fortunately, there are cures and hacks for avoiding saying “sorry” too often and Latinas are sharing them on Instagram

A recent drawing we shared on our Instagram page, not only maps out ways to stop using the word but prompted other Latinas to share their tricks as well.

Recently, an artist on Instagram shared a drawing that maps out how to stop saying sorry when you don’t really need to. The post inspired users to share similar hacks to avoid apologizing.

It also got women to open up about why they do so.

Check out some of the tricks and reasons below!

This chica who learned that the “I’m sorry” and “don’t say you’re sorry” thing can be cyclical.

“My ex used to tell me this. He said I say sorry too much. When I’d say it, he’d ask what are you sorry for, you didn’t do anything. It’s like we were raised to be sorry for even being alive.” – moneekers

“Yes! Thank you for this!! Would it be much to ask if you all made another one on ‘how to say no.’ I over apologize and I suck at saying ‘no’ whenever I don’t want to do something.” – krna.drn3

“I’m so guilty of apologizing unnecessarily.” – mandieofmiami

This headliner.

“Been difficult to unlearn when you’re raised as a latina. Everything is an apology: disculpe, me puede dar la hora? Ay que pena, mis discuppas por llegar tarde, diaculpen la pobreza.” – m_n_m1975

I have been saying this for years. Save your sorry for when you are truly sorry. We, in this society, have been so conditioned to say sorry for everything that, I feel, the word has lost its meaning.” –longbeachliferadiotv

“Literally was talking yesterday about how this is a thing that I do that I need to stop. I need to cap myself at two apologies for the same thing. Anything more and it gets weird for the other person.” – MermaidZombie

“Space them out. One in the moment (or whenever you realize you did something you need to apologize for), and one after you have some time to think. The second should show that you’re aware you messed up, you regret it, and you’re working to make sure it won’t happen again… but they should both be succinct.” –AngryAngryAlice

This apology sandwich hack.

“Apology sandwich. Apologize, explain your actions, apologize again.” –OldSchoolNewRules

“If your tone is less than “I fucked up, and I hurt you, and it will never happen again” type of thing, then maybe an apology isn’t appropriate at all. “Thank you for being flexible” rather than “Sorry I couldn’t drive you to the airport,” for example.” –CowboyBoats

Try replacing “sorry” with “thank you”

“Genuinely the best advice for this. My girlfriend says sorry for things like the weather or a bad driver. She’s started replacing it with thank you. So “sorry for the weather” turns into ‘thank you for coming out with me despite the rain.’ Every time you go to say sorry, think of how you can thank someone for the same situation.” –NumerousImprovements9 points·2 years ago

“Yes!! Exactly this. I’ve been getting better with not apologizing and now I’m trying to work on not saying the word “just”. I’ll sprinkle it in like “Hey can I have just a moment of your time.” or “I just need you to complete this.” It really minimizes what I’m trying to say and trivializes the importance of the task.” –SpiritedAnybody

This trick is a reminder that you shouldn’t apologize just to get off of the hook.

“I used to be like this. I thought it would ‘absolve’ me or make me a better person or whatever, but it was the opposite. It’s super toxic. Apologizing is supposed to make the other person feel better… not you. If somebody has to make you feel better afterwards, then it wasn’t an apology in the first place.” – EntropyMuffin

“A few years ago a senior, female colleague overheard me making phone calls and commented on how often apologised. She suggested that I stop, I did, and realised that people seemed to respect me more because of it. Success! Around the same time, I stopped being ‘the smiley one who makes cupcakes’ at work and focused on developing a more professional. I’m still friendly and approachable, but I now make a point of earning respect through hard work and try to give better praise to my coworkers (e.g. “great work” rather than “I like your hair”).” – damnfinecupotea

Always remind yourself that saying “sorry” one too many times can make others think you’re not very confident or capable.

“This is good advice in general. I’ve noticed at work that whenever someone points out something I’ve done wrong (even when I had no way of knowing that thing was wrong, such as when the person in charge of a project changes its goals and doesn’t specifically tell me), I’ll always say sorry. I’ve noticed though that the people higher up here never say sorry for anything, which is probably partly why they’re higher up – they appear stronger. The thing is, when I say “sorry” what I often mean is “I didn’t mean any offence/ill intent in doing this thing.” Maybe I should stop, but it just seems more polite than saying “Okay, sure” when someone points out a mistake I’ve made.” –JupiterCloud

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The Vatican Promises To Get To The Bottom Of The Pope’s Instagram ‘Like’ Of A Lingerie Model

Things That Matter

The Vatican Promises To Get To The Bottom Of The Pope’s Instagram ‘Like’ Of A Lingerie Model

Buda Mendes / Getty Images

This might not be one that they’ll be able to simply blame on the intern. It turns out that last week, the Pope’s official Instagram account ended up giving a ‘like’ to a scantily clad Brazilian lingerie model.

Instead of letting the story die off as these types of stories usually do, the Vatican has made a mountain out of a molehill and keeps pushing the ‘scandal’ further into the spotlight.

The Vatican now now started an investiagation into the matter, vowing to get to the bottom of the ‘papal like.’ They’re also allegedly working with Instagram to find out how such an incident could happen – because according to the Vatican it definitely wasn’t the work of anyone inside the Holy See.

The Vatican vows to investigate how the Pope’s Instagram account ended up ‘liking’ a lingerie models photos.

THe Vatican announced this week that they’re launching in actual investigation into the the curious case of Pope Francis’ official Instagram account giving a ‘like’ to a photo of a Brazilian model in a schoolgirl’s uniform.

A spokesperson for the Vatican, who denied that the ‘like’ came from within the Vatican, told NBC News on Friday that it was seeking answers from the popular social media app.

“We are studying what happened with the help of the competent office at Instagram,” said Matteo Bruni, director of the Vatican Press office.

Vatican officials admit that a team of communications specialists run the pope’s social media accounts, but the Vatican denies that the ‘like’ came from one of it’s own. Their theory is that the ‘like’ is the doings of an outside source.

It all started when it appear Pope Francis’ Instagram account like a photo of a lingerie model in a school girl’s uniform.

Pope Francis is one of the world’s most popular world-leaders across social media. He has more than 7.4 million followers on Instagram and 18.8 million on Twitter. However, he follows exactly zero accounts in return. But the Vatican insists he isn’t handling his own social media accounts.

Nevertheless, a photo posted by Brazilian model Natalia Garibotto to her Instagram on October 6, received a ‘holy like’ from Pope Francis’ Instagram. And it wasn’t just any photo. In the photo, the lingerie model is wearing a revealing school girl-inspired outfit and high white stockings with suspenders.

It was unclear when the pope’s official account gave the model his blessing, but the “like” was visible on Nov. 13 before being unliked the following day, the Catholic News Agency reported.

However, it’s worth noting that the pope rarely administers his own social media accounts. “The pope is not like Donald Trump, he’s not sitting around using his phone or computer to tweet all day long,” said Robert Mickens, the Rome-based editor of the English-language edition of the Catholic daily newspaper La Croix.

“He does, for example, approve the tweets – but not the likes – and on very rare occasions he has said he would like to tweet something because of a developing situation or emergency. So he would have nothing to do with this – it’s the communications department, and how this happens … who knows.”

Meanwhile, the model who received the papal like, joked “At least I’m going to heaven.”

Natalia Garibotto, the model in question, has 2.4 million followers on Instagram and took the papal endorsement with pride. She even joked on Twitter that “At least I’m going to heaven.”

According to Garibotto’s website, subscribers have “exclusive” access to “sexy content, follow back on socials… signed Polaroid’s” and the opportunity to speak to her directly.

Garibotto – who is also a streamer on the gaming website Twitch – told one Instagram follower she was “excited” about the “like” as she is religious. Meanwhile, her management company, COY Co., has also been playing up the controversy, wasting no time in seizing the opportunity to promote the model on social media.

“COY Co. has received the POPE’S OFFICIAL BLESSING,” the company said on Instagram last week.

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Latinas Share Indigenous Sheroes They Admire

Fierce

Latinas Share Indigenous Sheroes They Admire

JOHAN ORDONEZ / Getty

There’s no doubt that the ongoing health and wellbeing of our planet, even despite the sickly state that it is in currently, can be credited to the work of Indigenous women. Women of indigenous descent have long cared for our environment and the people around them. As leaders, indigenous women have managed to prevail and continue despite the persistent attempts to keep them down and stifle them.

Sadly, these women who should be cherished and honored, face extreme violence and civil rights violations. And yet, they still strive to achieve success and health for their communities despite being overlooked and underrecognized.

We asked Latinas on FIERCE about Indigenous Sheroes they admire so that we could learn more about them.

Check out the answers below

“Rigoberta Manchu. You?” –eleanor_rigby_86

“Lila Downs!”- gitanagatana

“Shima, my mom, is my Indigenous Shero. She grew up speaking only Navajo and was raised in traditional Navajo home. She Was taken at 8 to boarding school and punished till she learned English. Graduated high school and college. She retired from the state of Oklahoma as a child social worker and worked for a few more years as a sexual abuse advocate. Her and my dad have been married for 47 years, have four successful children and grandchildren. My mom experienced abuse, prejudice, hunger, poverty and fought for the life she wanted. She endured these snd many more hardships with a smile and kind heart. She is still the most loving and forgiving woman I know. She is my constant cheerleader, my best friend, and an example of unconditional love. Her family and home has been her joy. I was blessed that she chose me to be her daughter. My mom blesses my life daily. I would not have the life and adventures of she wasn’t always telling me to “just do it” or “go for it.” Ahe’hehe shima.” –cheebah73005

“Rigoberta Menchu.” –sule_recinos

“La Malinche.” –mdxlvi

“My great grandma Mary.” –brianaya6

“My grandma Natividad, the strongest woman I know.” –sara__tineo

“My grandma Severina.” –_mccbr

“Debra Haaland!” –robyn.degrasse

@rigobertamenchu, an Indigenous feminist and human rights activist in Guatemala who has tirelessly fought for the rights of Guatemala’s Indigenous People during and after our Civil War. She’s an admirable woman.” –nuschb

@raynaespinosa_ she will literally take her shirt off her back to help others. She is always there to fight for everyone’s rights she will do whatever it takes to make her voice heard! I admire her strength and I admire how she is not afraid to show her roots and educate others.” –mitchitymitch

“Gabriella Caźares-Kelly from @indivisibletohono21h.” –soniarita.az

@_cierrraaa a dear friend in law school, whose smile would make my day. Just wanted her to know that I think she is amazing! And I miss her!” –_ashlyndarling

@barb_hartzell You are that badass woman I admire! Miss you and Bunny!”- hildanucete

“Yes @helenknott05 . Strong , activities , poet, and writer.” –her_trademark

“Maestra Grace of @curanderismohealingart.” –elizagboquin

@tiffanyy_rae makes me feel more connected to my roots.” –mayracarrillo3

@guajajarasonia from Brazil.” –la_licorne_en_velours_

@illmaddocks she is an amazing person I met years ago.. who’s always educating about her roots and always representing her tribe..I have so much love for her and admire her dearly.” –gritona

@nikitaelyse you go girl 🙌🏼 you’re not “something else” to us.”  –trustisnotlost

“My maestra and friend @lzch0522 She has taught me so much about our culture and is an advocate for people’s rights. She isn’t afraid to make her voice heard.” –pelagio_c

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