Culture

Taco Bell Is Dumping Your Favorite Menu Items Because Of COVID, So RIP 7-Layer Burrito

Heads up! If you’ve been a steadfast lover of Taco Bell menu classics such as the Spicy Potato Soft Taco or Cheesy Fiesta Potatoes you better hit up one of the chains ASAP. In a heartbreaking announcement, the fast-food restaurant revealed that they will officially be eighty-sixing the beloved menu items starting in August.

Last week, Taco Bell announced its intentions to “simplify” its menu by putting 11 of its items into retirement.

“This evolved menu approach comes after months of analyzing the new way we are running our restaurants,” the company said in a statement. “We want to ensure an easy and fast ordering experience for our guests and team members.” Starting August 13, you’ll no longer be able to order the Grilled Steak Soft Taco, 7-Layer Burrito, Nachos Supreme, Beefy Fritos Burrito, Spicy Tostada, Triple Layer Nachos, Spicy Potato Soft Taco, Cheesy Fiesta Potatoes, Loaded Grillers (Cheesy Potato, Beefy Nacho), Chips & Dips and the Mini Skillet Bowl.

The Quesarito will remain on the men but will not be featured on the menu boards. Customers can order the item digitally through the Taco Bell website or app.

According to the statement it appears the changes are part of a strategy in responding to COVID -19 and its effects on the chain’s employees and customers. “Since the start of COVID, we’ve made changes at the restaurant level with the safety of our Team Members and guests as our top priority, but we didn’t just stop there. Our new normal has also transformed the way we look at innovation and product testing at our global headquarters. What was once an ‘all hands on deck’ approach in our famous test kitchen has switched to virtual brainstorms and kitchen simulations. Our teams have shifted from in-person focus groups to contactless drive-thru tastings. We’ve learned to adapt to ensure Taco Bell’s long history of innovation never stops.”

Fortunately, while Taco Bell is canceling items on its menu, they’re also adding to it.

Taco Bell announced that its new menu changes will include the addition of two new items. Taco Bell lovers can look forward to the addition of the $5 Grande Nachos Box: a concoction made up of layers of beef, refried beans, a cheese sauce, a three-cheese blend, pico de gallo, guacamole, and sour cream piled high onto a bed of tortilla chips. Taco Bell’s $1 Beef Burrito will also grace the menu as a permanent addition to the Cravings Value Menu.

As heartbreaking as saying goodbye to those Loaded Grillers may be, Taco Bell assures that the simplified menu will mean “a more efficient Taco Bell experience” and “will leave room for new fan favorites, continued progress in categories such as plant-based diets, and even opportunities for the return of some classics on a limited-time basis.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

Culture

A University Is Releasing A Historic Mexican Cookbook Filled With Recipes You’d Want To Try

UTSA

The University of Texas San Antonio is bringing the history of Mexico into our kitchens. The university is releasing cookbooks that are collections of historic Mexican recipes. Right now, the desserts book is out and online for free. Main dishes and appetizers/drinks are coming soon.

You can now taste historic Mexico thanks to the University of Texas San Antonio.

UTSA has had an ongoing project of preserving, collecting, and digitizing cookbooks from throughout Mexico’s history. Some books date back to the 1700s and offer a look into Mexico’s culinary arts and its evolution.

UTSA has been digitizing Mexican cookbooks for years and the work is now being collected for people in the time of Covid.

Millions of us are still at home and projects like these can be very exciting and exactly what you need. The recipes are a way to distract yourself from the current reality.

“The e-pubs allow home cooks to use the recipes as inspiration in their own kitchens,” Dean Hendrix, the dean of UTSA Libraries, said in UTSA Today. “Our hope is that many more people will not only have access to these wonderful recipes but also interact with them and experience the rich culture and history contained in the collection.”

The free downloads are a way for people to get a very in-depth look into Mexican food history.

The first of three volumes of the cookbooks focuses on desserts so you can learn how to make churros, chestnut flan, buñelos, and rice pudding. What better way to spend your quarantine than learning how to make some of these yummy desserts. We all love sweets, right?

If you want to get better with making your favorite desserts, check out this cookbook and make it happen.

There is nothing better than diving into your history and using food as your guide. Food is so intrinsically engrained in our DNAs and identities. We love the foods and sweets from our childhood because they hold a clue as to who we are and where we come from. This historical collection of recipes throughout history is the perfect way to make that happen.

READ: The Laziest Food Hacks In All Of The Land Would Send Your Abuela To The Chancla

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

People Have A Lot Of Opinions About The Argentina Episode Of Netflix’s ‘Street Food: Latin America’

Culture

People Have A Lot Of Opinions About The Argentina Episode Of Netflix’s ‘Street Food: Latin America’

Manuel Velasquez / Getty Images

Netflix has a new food show out and it has everyone buzzing. “Street Food: Latin America” is bringing everyone the sabor of Latin America to their living room. However, reviews are mixed because of Argentina and the lack of Central American representation.

Netflix has a new show and it is all about Latin American street food.

Some of the best food in the world comes from Latin America. That is just a fact and it isn’t because our families and community come for Latin America. Okay, maybe just a little. The food of Latin America comes with history and stories that have shaped our childhood. For many of us, it is the only thing we have that connects us to the lands our families have left.

The show is highlighting the contributions of women to street food.

“Street Food: Latin America” focuses mainly on the women that are leading the street food cultures in different countries in Latin America. For some of them, it was a chance to bring themselves out of poverty and care for their children. For others, it was a rebellion against the male-dominated culture of cooking in Latin America.

However, some people have some strong opinions about the show and they aren’t good.

There is a lot of attention to native communities in the Latino community culturally right now. The Argentina episode where someone claims that Argentina is more European is rubbing people the wrong way right now. While the native population of Argentina is small, it is still important to highlight and honor native communities who are indigenous to the lands.

The disregard for the indigenous community is upsetting because indigenous Argentinians are fighting for their lives and land.

An A Jazeera report focused on an indigenous community in northern Argentina who were fighting to protect their land. After decades of discrimination and humiliation, members of the Wichi community fought to protect their land from the Argentinian government grabbing it in 2017. Early this year, before Covid, children of the tribe started to die at alarming rates of malnutrition.

Another pain point in the Latino community is the complete disregard of Central America.

Central America includes Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Belize, and Panama. Central America’s exclusion is not sitting right with Netflix users with Central American heritage. Like, how can five whole countries be looked over during a Netflix show about street food in Latin America?

Seems like there is a chance for Netflix to revisit Latin America for more food content.

There are so many countries in Latin America that offer delicious foods to the world. There is more to Latin America than Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Argentina, Colombia, and Bolivia.

READ: This Iconic Mexican Food Won The Twitter Battle To Be Named Latin America’s Best Street Food

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com