Culture

It’s Time For The US To Adopt Indigenous Peoples’ Day In Place Of Columbus Day

Today is INdigenous People’s Day. While some people still try to celebrate Christopher Columbus Day, many cities across the country have replace the day with Indigenous People’s Day to honor and respect the indigenous people of this land. It is also a way to set the record straight and tell the true history of Christopher Columbus’ legacy.

Indigenous People’s Day is slowly replacing Christopher Columbus Day, as it should tbh.

For years, we have all been told about how Christopher Columbus “sailed the ocean blue” to discover America in 1492. Teachers told us that he came to the New World and helped to develop it into a place where Europeans could colonize and better the land. However, that is not the way that Native American descendants remember that violent moment in history.

The reclaimed holiday is shining a light on the resilience and plight in native communities.

The Native American communities faced untold horror and devastation when the Europeans began arriving. The French, English, and Spanish participated in decimating the Native communities through disease and war to take land that belonged to the various tribes.

“Well, if we’re truly wanted to celebrate the progress that we’ve made in this country, then Indigenous Peoples’ Day is completely fitting because we were meant to be completely either killed off or assimilated into mainstream society, and we’re still here,” Rep. Deb Haaland told Full Frontal with Samantha Bee.

Indigenous Peoples’ Day gives Americans a chance to learn the true history of this nation.

Native communities have known for centuries how brutal Columbus was to the First Nations people in the U.S. The colonizer used smallpox and a slew of other diseases to kill off Native Americans to take the land. It is brutal history that has long been buried and sugar-coated for school children, much like slavery in history textbooks. It is a disservice to the American people and the resilient Native American communities to continue to ignore the true brutal magnitude of Columbus.

Several states are replacing Columbus Day with holidays honoring the indigenous communities of the U.S.

Alaska, Hawaii, Maine, New Mexico, Oregon, South Dakota, Vermont, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina, Virginia, Wisconsin, and Washington D.C. all observe a holiday for indigenous people instead of Columbus. Alabama and Oklahoma recognize both holidays.

Recognizing Indigenous Peoples’ Day is a minimal and impactful way to honor indigenous people.

It doesn’t really change anything. Instead of spending the day sleeping in and off work in honor of a colonizer, you can spend a day sleeping in and off of work in honor of indigenous people.

“Indigenous Peoples’ Day is a way to honor the people who lived and thrived on this continent before colonization,” Rep. Haaland said in a video honoring the holiday. “The celebration of this day is a long time coming. Activists, community organizers, and the indigenous community worked hard lobbying lawmakers, hosting rallies, and showing tour culture proudly wherever we go so that we could finally correct the record and recognize the real history of this country.”

READ: People On Twitter Are Dropping Real Christopher Columbus Knowledge For Indigenous Peoples Day

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A Native American Veteran Shared a Video of Himself Being Tased By a Park Ranger on Sacred Grounds in New Mexico

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A Native American Veteran Shared a Video of Himself Being Tased By a Park Ranger on Sacred Grounds in New Mexico

Screenshot via hou5edm/Instagram

Recently, a video went viral of a New Mexico park ranger tasing a Native American man that sparked a conversation about the right non-Indigenous government authorities have to exert over Indigenous Americans.

Last Sunday, a Native American man named Darrell House shared a video of himself screaming in agony and calling for help as a park ranger tased him.

In the four-minute long clip posted to Instagram, House screams for help and writhes in agony on the ground as the unnamed park ranger continuously uses his taser on him. The woman recording the altercation repeatedly yells “What are you doing?” at the ranger while the ranger continues to demand that House show him his ID.

House, who grew up on a reservation and is of Navajo and Oneida descent, wrote a lengthy caption describing in detail what had transpired.

House wrote: “Today 12/27/2020, I was tased for being off trail at the Petroglyphs. I come here to pray and speak to my Pueblo Ancestor relatives. Even though I’m Navajo and Oneida, I honor this land.”

“Here, you will see a white man abuse his power. Both men pulled tasers on me after the first 1 couldn’t keep me down. This could have been a civil interaction. The law doesn’t work for the Indigenous. The government doesn’t give a shit about us. This was uncalled for. You see I’m clearly on the trail. I explained my reason for being off trail (which I shouldn’t have to. If anyone has the right to be off trail and wander this land, it’s the NATIVE INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY!”

“I didn’t feel I needed to identify myself for doing absolutely nothing wrong.
I’m traumatized. My left leg is numb and still bleeding. [My dog] Geronimo is shaking and hasn’t stopped. I’m shaking.”

Darrell House, who is also a military veteran, added: “I’m good people, the Marines I served with would agree. The many people I’ve crossed paths with–you know me.”

In response to the public outcry, the National Park Service said they were “investigating” the incident.

The National Park Service says that House was cited for walking off-trail at Petroglyph National Monument. House does not deny the claim, but says that walking where he wants to on sacred indigenous grounds is an ancestral right.

“Nature is what we’ve been worshipping … and protecting it has always been our job,” he told NBC News. “I am Native, you know. I have rights to this land. I have rights off the trail.”

House also doesn’t deny refusing to identify himself to the park ranger. “I didn’t see a reason to give my identification,” he said. “I don’t need to tell people why I’m coming there to pray and give things in honor to the land. I don’t need permission or consent.”

The local Albuquerque government has since become involved, releasing a statement that said the incident had been “elevated to the Federal investigation level”.

City Councilor Cynthia Borrego wrote that the incident was “troubling” and “uncomfortable” to watch and that her officer “recognizes and supports the investigation into any indigenous rights that may have been violated as a result of the actions taken in this unfortunate incident.”

The statement concluded by reiterating that Native Americans have the right “to practice their cultural beliefs as protected by the American Indian Religious Freedom Act and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.”

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A Paragliding Santa From California Got Entangled In Power Lines

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A Paragliding Santa From California Got Entangled In Power Lines

picture alliance / Getty

Ho ho… whoa.

It’s the holiday season and as we all know this compacted with the singularity of 2020, guarantees a winter full of the bizarre. Previous incidents have made Santas stuck in chimneys and elves thieving a sort of holiday norm. Just when we thought nothing could really shock us, a recent story out of Rio Linda, California is shaking up the holiday weirds.

On Sunday, the power lines of Rio Linda, California received a particular shock when a paraglider dressed as Santa Claus fell crashed right into them.

The Santa was spotted being stuck in the power lines for over an hour on Sunday before he was safely removed.

According to the Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District, the Santa Clause was released from the power lines after being trapped for over an hour. CBS Sacramento reported that a woman by the name of Alisa Cumbra learned bout the incident after her son recorded the crash. Cumbra told CBS she didn’t know what to believe.

“I’m like, is he okay? Did he get electrocuted? What’s going on?” Cumbra explained.

Neighbors told outlets that they’ve heard the pilot in the skies in the area before. “We see him flying around all of the time. It’s like some kind of go-kart with a parachute on top of it,” a woman named Crystal Kennedy, who lives near the crash site explained.

“He did it. He went ahead and did it. He hit the power line,” a woman named Angela, who claimed to be the pilot’s friend told CBS.

According to friends of the flying Santa, the pilot just wanted to spread some holiday cheer.

“He was just flying over here to drop off some candy canes for the kids. And, that’s when he experienced engine problems,” Kennedy explained.

According to the fire department, there were no conductions from the lines occurring at the time. “The pilot had a mishap. He was actually out doing something, really good for the community, and in 2020 I think it’s something we all need,” Cpt. Chris Vestal said.

“We are happy to report #Santa is uninjured and will be ready for #Christmas next week, but perhaps with a new sleigh!” the fire department wrote.

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