Things That Matter

Kellyanne Conway’s Own Daughter Filmed Her Cursing And Talking About COVID-19

Updated October 8, 2020.

By now we all know that Claudia Conway is The Queen of holding her mother Kellyanne Conway accountable. So it’s no surprise, that the outspoken teen and daughter to President Donald Trump’s former counselor publically called out her mom for giving her COVID-19 earlier this week.

And of course, she did it on her favorite platform: TikTok… We just didn’t expect for her to do it to Donald Trump (AKA leader of the free world) himself.

Which means…

Kellyanne Conway is officially duking it out with COVID and her daughter.

TikTok

Since confirming her COVID-19 diagnosis last Friday, Kellyanne’s 15-year-old daughter Claudia has been tracking and sharing her every move. And the former White House aid is less than pleased. In a post shared to Claudia’s TikTok account this week, Kellyanne can be seen and heard scolding her daughter for sharing the news.

“You caused so much disruption. You lied about your f****ing mother about COVID? About COVID?!” Kellyanne yells at her daughter while lying with her in bed.

“That’s how I interpreted it,” Claudia replied.

“Interpreted it?” Kellyanne demanded before realizing her daughter was recording the conversation. “You’re taping me again?”

Kellyanne responded on Twitter to her daughter’s leaks with a tweet that criticized those encouraging her behavior.

“My daughter, Claudia, is beautiful & brilliant. She has access to top doctors & health care & lives comfortably,” she tweeted. “Like all of you, she speculates on social media. Yet she’s 15. You are adults. We have COVID, but it’s clear who’s really sick.”

Last Friday, Claudia Conway revealed to the world that Kellyanne had Coronavirus prompting her mother to make the announcement herself.

Last Friday, soon after it was revealed that Donald Trump had tested positive for Coronavirus, Claudia, posted a video of herself on TikTok wearing a face mask with a caption that read “update my mom has covid.”

“Bye i’m done i’ll see you all in two weeks,” Claudia wrote in the caption. Almost an hour later, Kellyanne confirmed to the public that she had tested positive for COVID-19 on Twitter. “My symptoms are mild (light cough) and I’m feeling fine. I have begun a quarantine process in consultation with physicians,” she wrote. “As always, my heart is with everyone affected by this global pandemic.”

News of Kellyanne’s diagnosis comes at a time when many in the president’s inner circle have been tested for and diagnosed with Coronavirus. Hope Hicks, the president’s senior counselor, his wife Melania Trump, and White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, as well as members of Congress, have all been in contact with the president and contracted the virus.

Conway, Trump’s longtime aide, had reportedly been in close contact with the president as he prepared for his debate against Joe Biden last Tuesday. She also attended a Sept. 26 Rose Garden event for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett, which reportedly saw 150 high-profile guests in attendance. According to reports, many in attendance did not wear masks.

Soon after revealing her mother’s diagnosis, Claudia shared a follow-up video to her 948,000 TikTok followers.

Claudia Conway/ TikTok

“Im furious,” she wrote in the follow-up video. “Wear your masks. dont listen to our idiot fucking president piece of shit. protect yourself and those around you.”

On Friday, Claudia also posted that she was “suspicious” that her mother might have COVID noting that Kellyanne was “coughing all around the house after trump tested positive for COVID. She shared the video with audio of Cardi B saying “that’s suspicious.”

After spotting attempts by Trump to downplay his COVID diagnosis, Claudia publically called out the president.

On Monday, after a COVID-19 diagnosis and a weekend in the hospital, Trump returned to the White House and insisted that he was doing well, despite suspicions to the contrary. After all, according to CNN, a source familiar with the President’s health said “The President’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We are still not on a clear path to a full recovery.” Before making a public appearance on a balcony of the White House and removing his mask (thus risking exposure of the virus to others) Trump insisted that he had mild symptoms, and tweeted to followers “Don’t be afraid of COVID.”

In response, Claudia replied “guys lmao he’s not doing ‘better.'” The teenager went on to explain that the president is “so ridiculous, apparently, he’s doing so badly.”

Claudia has been outspoken about her parent’s political beliefs and slammed them both publicly for their conservatism.

This past August, Kellyanne and her husband George Conway, posted that they would resign from their posts to focus more on their family after a string of claims made by Claudia to the press and on TikTok.

“I will be transitioning from the White House at the end of this month,” Kellyanne wrote in a statement posted to Instagram. “George is also making changes. We disagree about plenty but we are united on what matters most: the kids. Our four children are teens and ‘tweens starting a new academic year, in middle school and high school, remotely from home for at least a few months. As millions of parents nationwide know, kids ‘doing school from home’ requires a level of attention and vigilance that is as unusual as these times. This is completely my choice and my voice. In time, I will announce future plans. For now, and for my beloved children, it will be less drama, more mama.”

Soon after her parents’ announcements, Claudia wrote in a post to TikTok that “words are not enough to express my love for my following. you are all amazing. thank you for the support and love. may you feel my love and peace back. i am taking a break to process this recent news and to stabilize my mental health. i love you. i love you. i love you.”

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Conservatives And Liberals On Reddit Are Sharing What They Think Will Happen If Trump Wins 2020

Things That Matter

Conservatives And Liberals On Reddit Are Sharing What They Think Will Happen If Trump Wins 2020

Joe Raedle / Staff

There’s no doubt that the presidential election will change the course of our country’s history no matter the outcome. Still, despite this, liberals and conservatives have some ideas of what will happen if Donald Trump wins.

We found some of the predictions from both sides of the parties and those in-between!

Check them out below

“I think he gets even more lazy in his second term and completely stops giving a shit. More golf. More rants. More tweets. Less policy (which is hard but he’ll manage.” –xTheBigShow

“Don’t forget some old fashioned corruption and setting up his family with lots of insider perks around the world.”- DukeofDixieland

“Do you think that will result in us being more vulnerable, i.e. to terrorism, or economic arbitrage?” –Learned_foot

“If Trump manages to win re-election, it would confirm several things for me:

  • The world is moving into a replay of the interwar period, with increasing nationalism, racism, and authoritarianism.
  • True, old-school conservatism doesn’t really exist in the Western Hemisphere anymore.
  • The population of Republicans in the U.S is far larger than polls suggest.
  • In addition to this, polls aren’t answered by the general populace, and that the average American’s response to hearing a political poll or any poll is to hang up.
  • Extreme socially right positions mixed in with economically left positions aimed at the rural poor will be the strategy the GOP follows going forward.
  • White grievance politics is the single strongest force in American politics. Bar none. (If you can convince the lowest white man he’s better than the best colored man, he won’t notice you’re picking his pocket. Hell, give him somebody to look down on, and he’ll empty his pockets for you. as LBJ would say.)
  • Populism is the dominant ideology of the United States.
  • The ‘Obama coalition’ never really belonged to the Democrats as a party, and voters were just attracted to Obama’s singular personality and massive charisma, and isn’t existent otherwise.
  • This country is probably f***ed.

As for what will happen under a second Trump term, I fully expect the U.S to move towards a Brazilian or Hungarian-style authoritarian state where democracy is greatly weakened but not (yet) formally abolished, although somewhat balanced by the power of individual states. Freedoms and institutions will be further eroded and human rights abuses, corruption and cronyism will further increase. Pogroms, riots, shootings, and other acts of political violence will probably become commonplace.

Relative to the rest of the world, the quality of life for the typical American will further deteriorate, but not collapse. Particularly, I wouldn’t be surprised if suicide rates drastically increase from their already high number, especially among Generation Z. Internationally, a Trump victory will signal to allies to permanently forgo of the notion of the U.S. as a reliable ally, signalling a shift in international relations and the end of the era of Pax Americana.” –OfElephantMonkeys

“We will have COVID forever.” –TheManWhoWasNotShort

“Does he improve?

No

Does he learn anything from the pandemic?

No

is his second term just full force fascism?

More or less.” – postwarmutant

“What do you think full force fascism looks like? Do you think he’ll suspend the 2024 elections? or the 2022 elections? Will he disband the supreme court? Open camps for his political opposition?” – Learned_foot

“The US wont survive another Trump term. The Constitution wasnt written with enough scrutiny to protect what we think of as our rights from the active erosion being done to civil liberties.

Our system of government was founded far to much on an unspoken uncodified code that is far too easy to ignore. The AG is arguing that standing Presidents dont have to follow the law. If that is true, then a standing President can invalidate the law as long as his party willfully supports it at the legislative level.” – Add1kt

“I don’t think much of anything will happen. Donald Trump is pretty lazy and and does not care about anything other than his own bottom line. His only legislative accomplishment has been a tax cut that primarily benefited the wealthy. He would attempt to pass another tax cut in a second term under the guise of economic stimulus but it won’t go anywhere under a Democrat controlled House. I really don’t see him tacking leftward and working with a Dem house and/or Senate.

RBG will not live for another four years. Breyer is 81 and Clarence Thomas is 72 so there will be at least one and possibly three supreme court justice appointments over the next four years. He could have a lasting effect there.

Other than that, a second term would just be a static period in the nation where problems are ignored, partisan division persist, and America’s standing in the world is further eroded.” – bender710

“He’d probably just link the treasury to his personal banks accounts and spend every penny we pay in taxes.” – messiestbessie

“I think the Republicans and their donors will start stealing like mad. They know the status quo is unsustainable, that America as we know it now is a sinking ship. So they’re going to loot as much as they can as fast as they can before bailing out.

If the Democrats win the election, then the ship can be salvaged. This wouldn’t be terrible for the rich donor class. Like any parasite, they like it when the host survives. But if Trump wins again, the ship will sink for certain, and then I foresee a scramble for whatever loot is left. The rich and the corporations, instead of scaling back their plundering, will ramp it up to crazy levels so they can get as much as they can before anyone steals it. It will be scramble competition.” – Stromboli16

“I think it depends on how he wins. Is it close? Did he lose the popular vote agin? Was it shady?” –HeresForHope

“He’ll be exactly the same.

Our planet is f***ed though. A lot of the bad things about Trump- destroyed our relations with allies, bad on healthcare, bad on education, bad on immigration, can change course once we get Democratic leadership again. The planet though? That damage is done.” – Reddit user 

“In short, I think it’s much worse than another poorly handled catastrophe and some national embarrassment on the global stage. I fully believe it will mark the beginning of a very dark period in American history.

If Trump wins, it means the Supreme Court becomes dominantly conservative for the next 40 years. It also likely means almost complete regulatory capture of government agencies by profit-driven private interests. Things like voter suppression and gerrymandering that have helped Republicans hold power become more solidified, so a democratic means of reversing the damage becomes unlikely. The presidency becomes mostly immune from oversight as the Senate and Supreme Court, which are both now perpetually conservative, either change the rules or refuse to enforce them.” – Dragnil

“I feel like if he wins the rest of the world will lose complete faith in us.” –greenline_chi

“It depends on how he wins.

If it’s so close and feels a bit fuccky, I’m down for the taking up arms thing, and I doubt I would be alone.

If it’s not close four more years of democratic “resistance” and trying to hold trump to a constitution that he’s never read.” –Uskmd

“To be fair, though, most conservatives haven’t read the constitution; and those who have display antipathy towards it.

I guess what I’m getting at is, what makes trump a different creature from the average conservative?” –Learned_foot

“What do you think will happen if Trump wins a second term?

States will try to secede again. Especially if Trump “wins” by blatantly crooked means, or through some sort of nutty EC shenanigans like having Republican governors suspend the election and appoint electors.” – PlayingTheWrongGame

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We Asked People About Retirement Savings And The Answers Will Shock You

Things That Matter

We Asked People About Retirement Savings And The Answers Will Shock You

Peter Dazeley / Getty

With all that’s going on in the world, it’s important to remember more than ever that taking our futures seriously is crucial. Still, not all of us know about saving up for retirement let alone ensuring that we’re staying on the right track when it comes to squirreling our finances away. Recently, a study by the Employee Benefit Research Institute revealed that a woman who is 25-years-old and saving for retirement would have to set aside double the amount of money she’s saving if stock market returns take a turn for the worst in the next few decades.

For advice on saving, we turned to Reddit and found when and how people started.

Check out the answers below.

“If you are in a position that you have 401k and IRA both maxed (and HSA if you are eligible), I recommend picking up a copy of the The Simple Path to Wealth by JL Collins. Or even if you don’t have all those accounts already maxed because I sure do not. I just finished reading it, it’s an informative book in plain English to get you started on the hows and whys of investing outside of tax sheltered retirement accounts.” – InternationalDivide3

“If I could upvote this twice, I would. Love that book. Completely changes our approach to investing for retirement.” – beloise

“I am going to read that book! Thank you for the suggestion.” – heysunflowerstate

“Thank you so much! I’ve been looking for something like this for a while.” – emmy__lou

“Single, no kids, no parents to support, age 55.5.

I didn’t start until my first post-graduate school job (assistant professor, 1997, age 33). I’m now federal employee @ ~ $180K. I started at 5% to get the match and both the percentage and my salary have increased. As of today, I contribute the full $19,500 and get a 5% match and have a combined $750K. I expect a minimum of $1M (probably more) at age 64. I also get a federal pension and social security and will have no student loans and a paid-off NoVA townhouse by age 64.

When I retire – ~ age 64 ~ I plan to sell the townhouse (~$450K), buy another home in a college town (PA through NM, location TBD) – preferably with room / in-law suite to rent to a grad student. Use the difference in sales prices to set up account to fund utilities / property taxes / repairs, use the rental income to cover upgrades, use social security to cover health insurance, use pension to cover living expenses / transportation, and use 401K to cover travel and entertainment (until it becomes long-term care).

Of course, the best laid plans …” –ADB_BWG

“I contributed to my 401k immediately with my first job out of college at 22, consistently contributed since (now 35) and this will be my 5th year maxing out the pretax contribution (19,500 this year). I always did enough to get the maximum company match, I was lucky to have a few promotions over the years that allowed me to get to the point I am now.” –thighgaap84

“For those who max your 401k, what’s your salary? I think I can do it this year on my salary without feeling it too much but just wondering. EDIT – well, shit, I’ve made well over 60k for over four years. So I can definitely be maxing. Whoops.”- workthrowa

“I started maxing my 401k when I started making ~60k/year. Before then I only contributed enough to get the company match. What really tipped the scales for me was

  1. using the smart asset paycheck calculator. This has always been very accurate for me down to a couple dollars when I want to see what a raise or contribution change means for my net paycheck; and
  2. doing the math to understand the tax implications. It was super empowering to see that with our budget at the time, I was able to afford doubling down on retirement. Before then I just assumed that it would be a hardship and wasn’t even willing to look into the math or the output of my choice.

Smart asset calculator in case it’s useful for others: https://smartasset.com/taxes/paycheck-calculator.” – beloise

“I didn’t start making mine until I was over $100k, but I wish I had sooner. We also starting maxing my husband’s at the same time since our joint income was enough to carry it. His salary was around $60k at that point but two earners makes a big difference.” –weasel_stoat

“$174k (I went from making about $82.5, and immediately maxed it out). Really wish i would have done more, sooner. I probably could not have maxed it out, but at least more.” –Aryne13

“Cost of living definitely makes a difference here; I did not max out my 401k when I was on a 60k salary because I live in NYC. And while I max it out now, when my expenses increase (e.g., if I have kids), I may not be able to do so even if my salary stays the same (and I’m at the point where I don’t expect it to rise significantly anymore).” –MerelyMisha

“Started maxing when I made $47k but was used to living like a college student. That money has grown big time. So glad I started early.” – chicksin206

“I started contributing after I graduated from law school (am 33 now) and, because of that never “missed the money” that I took from my check. I contributed to a employer sponsored 401(k) and later started contributing to a Back-Door Roth IRA.

  • I chose a traditional 401(k) as I expect to be making less money in retirement than while working.
  • I chose a Back-Door Roth because straight traditional – or Roth – contributions are not deductible/permissible at my income level.
  • I contribute the maximum each year (plus our retirement plan permits for “After-Tax” (not the same as Roth) contributions, so I add a couple grand there. I receive a 7.5% match.”- PersonalFinanceD

“As soon as I started my first job in highschool. I was mainly saving for university but I also put a bit away in an RRSP just to get started, which my parents suggested. It wasn’t much ($500, probably, throughout highschool.) But it normalized retirement savings as a thing to do from my very first paycheque and meant that when I got my first “big girl job” I wasn’t overwhelmed by the idea of having to research and open an account, etc.” –PracticalShine

“I’m cackling at your younger self opinion of a 401k, I wish it were true!!

I did something similar, contributed 6% ish until 26 when I switched jobs for the first time and got a decent pay bump. 2019 was the first year I maxed out at 28, and plan to keep that going.

For investing, I’ve been using a financial adviser to manage mutual funds since 26 as well. We revisit my goals once or twice a year to adjust contributions and investment allocation. It’s fairly conservative and right now am contributing large sums when my savings account gets high, I want to look into other options next time we meet to maybe deposit monthly. But I’ll probably listen to what he suggests.” –jamz512

“Y’all are so good! I started actually trying to save when I was 27ish and I’m 31 now. I focused on liquid savings for a long time though and in the last few years pivoted those good habits to retirement accounts.” –kamikatzie

“For anyone who thinks they don’t make enough money to invest in their retirement, please know that putting even as little as $50 (or even like $25) a month is better than not doing it at all. Things like compound growth with interest are your friend and will make that tiny amount of money balloon up over the course of a few decades.

I first moved to NYC out of college and made barely anything. I thought I could not afford to put money into my 401k let alone a Roth IRA. I started with my standard company match and then eventually bumped it up a few percentage points and hardly noticed the salary deductions. Fast forward a few years and I’m making more money and have exponentially more money in my retirement accounts because I bothered to start at 22. It’ll be even more by the time I retire. I have a fat amount of money in these accounts now because I put just a little money away as a naive fresh college grad.

Educate yourself as much as possible! Watch YouTube investing gurus, listen to finance podcasts, learning about this stuff isn’t hard if you’re open to listening!” –alum38

“I’m in basically the same situation and trajectory as you!

I’ve contributed at least the employer matching to my 401k (4-6%) since graduating college (22). I didn’t get super serious about it until maybe 26 or so, which coincided with a job switch where I got a sizable raise. I started maxing out my Roth IRA that year and increased my 401k contributions. This is the first year where I’ll max both out. I probably could have maxed out my 401k earlier but I had been saving for graduate school and a house downpayment.

Honestly I chose 401k because that’s just what my first job offered, and Roth IRA because I had a decent tax refund one year and decided to be responsible that year and put it towards retirement.

If you haven’t seen the r/personalfinance flowchart (https://www.reddit.com/r/personalfinance/wiki/commontopics#wiki_the_flowchart) that’s a good resource! Basically it depends what your goals are. Personally I’m saving for shorter term goals still, but the next steps if you’re trying to save more for retirement are usually HSA, 529, mega backdoor Roth, or other tax advantaged accounts!” –mdengineer4

“I’m Australian so our system is slightly different.

The government requires your employer to put 9.5% of your salary into a superannuation account for you. So if you earn $70,000 then $6,650 is put in an account for you.

I started making additional contributions (an extra $5k per year) at 25 and will do so until I buy a house because of the power of compound interest.” –currypuff63

“I started contributing to a 401k when I started my first real job after college graduation (age 23). I contributed 10% and that job matched 100% of the first 5% if I remember correctly. I’ve continued contributing 10% every since. So as my salary grows, so do my 401k contributions.

Now that my husband and I have finished paying off our student debt, we need to revisit our plan for investments and may choose to max out our 401k contributions. We haven’t hashed that out yet though.” – Reddit user

“I saved a tiny bit for retirement in my first post-college job. I delayed seriously saving for retirement until I was 28 (ouch) because I was in grad school then spent two years in temporary low-ish paying (but prestigious!) jobs that didn’t offer benefits. (I didn’t figure out how to open my own 401(k) or IRA, which I now regret). My spouse also delayed saving for the same reason (grad school) until he was 34 (double ouch).

For the past 3.5 years, we have both maxed out our retirement contributions and invested all of our spare money in the interest of catching up on retirement. We’re now expecting a kid, so our extra investment will slow down, but we do expect to continue maxing out our retirement contributions.” –PutridMarionberry

“I started with a Roth IRA pretty young – I think I was 18 the first year I contributed. I didn’t start a 401k until I was 28 because grad school takes forever, and I’ve been putting money in there at a pretty good clip. The funny thing about compound interest is that my Roth IRA is worth more than my 401k, even though the actual contribution amount was so much less.” –weasel_stoat

“Started contributing and maxing my Roth IRA around 22 and started contributing to my employers simple IRA after I graduated at 23. I have been at my current job for 4.5 years and contribute 10% with a 5 % match. I have yet to max it out but my company deposits profit sharing into it which helps immensely. I wish I had started earlier.” – fozhoe

“After finishing residency where I was working 6 days a week 14 hours a day and devoted one paycheck to rent, ~ 29 yo.”- sushdances

“I opened my Roth IRA when I was 23 (have been maxing it out for three years) and just opened my own solo 401(k) for my freelance income at 26 years old. I don’t get any benefits through my full time job, so I’m figuring all of this out on my own.” –Comfortable_Salad

“19 when I opened my IRA, but 26 when I actually started working towards maxing out contributions.” –Shannoniggy

“Very very late to the game but I’m in a position where I will get a pension (probably 80k a year?) and minimally contribute to a 403b. Maybe this is super naive of me but I’m really banking on the pension for retirement.” –gpc31

“I’ve saved between 5-15% of my salary in a 401k since I first started working in a job that offered one when I was about 22. I took a couple of years off retirement savings due to underemployment/not having a 401k, but whenever I’ve had a job that offered one, I’ve been saving. I’ve never maxed out my 401k because I’ve always lived in very HCOL areas and it hasn’t seemed reasonable to cut that much of my salary. Right now I’m saving 7%, because I’m trying to build up more liquid savings for a house down payment.” –butterwerkbatch

“I started contributing at age 23 but have not been able to max contributions (I’m 31 now). I have about $57k in my 401k and also have an IRA separate from my employer 401k. Hoping to wipe out debt this year and hopefully max out both next year!”- ny2017

“Growing up my parents really pushed the savings and retirement contributions. I didn’t fully understand it, but I put money in my savings account and then into my 401K when I was eligible. It wasn’t until I was in my late 20’s that I fully understood the concept and thought of money in an entirely different way. Now my husband and I max out our employer retirement accounts and are working to get our Roth’s maxed out too. I’m in my mid 30’s now and we are looking at early retirement. I wish I could go back and educate myself in my early 20’s!”- InherentlyFeminine

“I’m 26 now, but starting at 25, $1,050 has been invested in my retirement fund per month – half comes from me, and the other half is from my employer. I have a DB pension and the contribution increases whenever I make more. Come spring of this year, $1,300 will be put towards my retirement every month.

Honestly I had no choice in the matter. The pension is apart of my work benefits and participation is mandatory. Not that I’m complaining – it is seriously golden.” –shehasntseenkentucky

“At my first “real” job, i started to contribute to the 401k at the level the company matched at. I essentially did this for 10 plus years, maybe going a little over, but not much…And never really thought to put in any more. The last two or so years, though, i would increase a percentage of my contribution with ever COL increase I received.

In that 10 years, though, I paid off my student loans, and put a downpayment towards a home. For the past two years (going on 3), I have now maxed out the 401k, and put more money into other investment accounts, this is 100% because of a significant salary increase. I was ignorant in my twenties, had no clue that I should be contributing more, and with my salary, I was focused on saving for a downpayment and really, nothing more. I really wish, i would have contributed more. I have about $150k in one account, and $30k in another, at 35, and this could have been so much more…” –Aryne13

“I’ve always been more of a saver than a spender, but I don’t think I got serious about it until I was 32. Until then, I saved primarily in bank accounts, stacked cash in an IRA but didn’t invest it, etc.” –Kindly_Sprinkles

“I’ve had an IRA since I was 18, but I didn’t really start saving for retirement until I got my first real job at 23. I just did our taxes and we owe money for the first time ever and I also learned that we’re over the threshold for saving in an IRA, so I think I’ll put more money into my 401k and work toward maxing that out.” –ancientbluehaired

“When I graduated I made $50k, was $25k in debt, and contributed 10% to retirement. This was 2015.

I think I bumped it up to 12% when I was done with my loans and making ~70k.” –MaotheMao21


“To phrase it the way that makes me sound pretty good: as soon as I had access to a 401(k) I started contributing almost $200 a paycheck.

To phrase it the way that makes me sound much worse: I didn’t start saving for retirement until I was 25. And closer to 26 than 25.

Took me over six months out of college to get a fulltime job, then I lost that job six months in and it took me a year and a half to get another. In between I made barely enough to cover my student loan payments and my car loan and insurance.
Nobody ever told me I could, and should, put money in an IRA while I was in college. I had at least a few hundred dollars to spare then that I could have saved.” –walkingonairglow

“Right out of college. I was making $32k in the late 90s and contributed up to the match of my 401k (it was 3%) more than 25 years later, that year worth about $70k of my retirement portfolio now.

The moral of the story is, no matter how little your have, time is in your side when you start early.

Do the best that you can!”-  Reddit users

“Not American, but last year I started paying maybe 3% into a pension scheme, there was no employer match so it was hard to justify paying in more when we were trying to buy our first home. We’ve bought that house and I’ve also moved job, now I pay 5% and my employer pays 8%.

My fiancé and I are late 20s. We’re getting married soon (on a budget), we have a mortgage and very small car loan but no cc or education debt. We’re not planning on trying for kids for a few years so maybe this is the right time to plough money into our pensions before we’ve got college funds etc to pay into.” –dickbuttscompanion

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