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Machismo In The Media

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Think Sexism is a Thing of the Past? Think Again.

Some men in the media put down women to make themselves feel macho….too bad it only makes them look small. Can you guess which presidential candidate makes the list? *hanging head in shame*

READ: 11 Latina Sexpectations The World Expects Us To Live Up To

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The Oxford Dictionary Is Finally Changing ‘Sexist’ Definitions Of The Word ‘Woman’

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The Oxford Dictionary Is Finally Changing ‘Sexist’ Definitions Of The Word ‘Woman’

Frances M. Ginter / Getty

Language has a tendency to be sexist.

Fortunately, Oxford University Press knows this and is making efforts to combat sexism and out of date language in its dictionaries. This year, their kicking off by tackling the word “woman.” According to Oxford University Press they’ve updated and changed the entry for “woman” in its dictionaries, including the Oxford English Dictionary, to promote equality and better describe women.

Oxford University Press explained in a recent statement that they’re expanding the dictionary’s coverage of women.

“We have expanded the dictionary coverage of ‘woman’ with more examples and idiomatic phrases which depict women in a positive and active manner,” the largest university press in the world explained in a statement. “We have ensured that offensive synonyms or senses are clearly labeled as such and only included where we have evidence of real-world usage.”

As part of their action, OUP added phrases such as “woman of the moment,” which had been absent from the dictionaries despite having the presence of ones like “man of the moment.”

According to CNN, “one of the definitions of ‘woman’ now refers to a ‘person’s wife, girlfriend, or female lover,’ as opposed to being tied to only a man. The definition for ‘man’ was updated to include gender-neutral terms and references to ‘sexual attractiveness or activity’ were revised for ‘man’ and ‘woman’ entries. OUP said its lexicographers regularly review entries to make sure they are accurate. This time around, the voice of the people helped create change.”

“Sometimes the team focus on topics highlighted by user feedback (such as last year’s petition about the definition of ‘woman’) and sometimes these topics are driven by current events or through projects taking place within the Oxford Languages team,” a spokesperson told CNN.

It’s not the first time OUP has updated its words. Recently, the dictionary for the English language has made changes to words related to race and gender identity. Earlier this year, OUP updated the use of “they” which is used as a pronoun by and for nonbinary people.

In 2019, OUP removed “sexist” terms for a woman after tens of thousands of people signed a Change.org petition.

In response to the petition, suggestive phrases about women were removed including “Ms September will embody the professional, intelligent yet sexy career woman,” according to CNN and phrases such as “I told you to be home when I get home, little woman.”

In a statement their definiitions, OUP wrote “Our dictionaries reflect, rather than dictate, how language is used… This is driven solely by evidence of how real people use English in their daily lives. With that in mind, lexicographers reviewed examples in its dictionary data to make sure representations of woman were positive and active.”

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Willow Smith Calls Out Her Mom Jada Pinkett For Enforcing Machismo While Growing Up With Brother Jaden

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Willow Smith Calls Out Her Mom Jada Pinkett For Enforcing Machismo While Growing Up With Brother Jaden

Jerod Harris / Getty

Machismo.

If you haven’t experienced it, you’ve definitely seen it. Most Latinas have watched it take form beneath the roof of their very own family homes and have experienced it first hand. From being glaringly aware of how much less time their brothers and papas spend in the kitchen to constantly being told to play less aggressively than the boys, most girls see it at a young age.

The children of celebrities are apparently no different.

Speaking about experiencing double standards in her own household, while growing up with her brother Jaden, Willow Smith got real on the Red Table Talk.

On this week’s Red Table Talk, Willow opened up about experiencing machismo with her mother, Jada Pinkett Smith and her grandmother Adrienne Banfield Norris.

“There is a difference between how Black moms treat their daughters and their sons,” Willow said in a clip. Willow went onto share that in her own experience it extended to “something as simple as getting up at the right time” where her mother would hurry her out of the house before school, Meanwhile Jaden was given more leniency.

“It was like, ‘You better get up. You better get dressed.’ I’d be in my room going like, ‘OK, I gotta get…,'” Willow says while acting stressed and hurried. “But then Jaden is there and she’d be like, ‘Uh, so are you ready to uh…’ and he’d be like, ‘Uh, maybe one moment.'”

Willow spoke about how machismo affected her while she would be “ready at the door” for school. While mimicking Jaden’s pace, and noting how slow he was going, Willow explained that he would be “getting his shoes on” with a lot less urgency.

“That’s true,” Jade laughed, “She might have a point. Because I was like she better be on it. You? Nah.”

Likely, Pinkett’s comment refers to her desire to see her daughter pay more attention and work harder in school.

“For me, I knew that she’s gonna have it twice as hard,” the “Girls Trip” star said. “I needed you to be strong because I know what this world is like for us as Black women… My fear for having a Black daughter and what I felt like she needed to be in this world put me in a position to be a little harder on her.”

And in ways, Pinkett’s reasoning comes from a place of well-meaning. After all, a study from The State of Black Women in Corporate America 2020  found that African-American women are repressed beyond belief in the United States underlining that Black women “who seek promotions at the same rate as white men, are only 58 percent as likely to be promoted to a managerial position and only 64 percent as likely to be hired into such positions. At a disadvantage from the beginning of their careers, Black women see the representation gap continue to widen and end up accounting for only 1.6 percent of vice presidents and 1.4 percent of C-suite executives, while white men hold 57 percent and 68 percent of those positions.”

Red Table Talk airs this Tuesdays at 9 a.m. PT/12 p.m. ET on Facebook Watch.

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