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Fashion Is The Second Most Polluting Industry In The World —And It’s Turning To Food Waste To Cut Down On Emissions

The world is in a dreadful mess if you haven’t noticed. And —surprise, surprise— a lot of it is caused by the fashion industry. Apparel and footwear production accounts for 8.1% of global greenhouse emissions —or as much as the total climate impact of the entire European Union. The current fast fashion “only wear it once” mentality is causing an unprecedented strain on the planet’s resources. And a few brands are taking note of the magnitude of the problem and see an opportunity. 

Both Fashion and the food industries are greatly responsible for an unprecedented strain on the planet’s resources.

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Analysts warn that the fashion market’s annual 5% growth is straining planetary resources “at an unprecedented level,” by raising production to more than 100 million tons by 2030. For those of us who don’t know, ’Fast Fashion’ can be defined as ‘the cheap, disposable clothing, made indiscriminately, imprudently and often without consideration for environmental and labor conditions’ by the companies we all love —like Zara, H&M, Forever 21 and Fashion Nova— it’s a disease and both the planet and the people are facing the consequences. 

Added on to the damage that fashion production causes, there’s the case of food production and waste. 

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Around the world, people eat around 100 billion bananas every year. That creates around 270 million tons of waste–from peels to stalks–which are often burned or left to rot. Crop burning pollutes the air, and rotting releases methane into the atmosphere and contributes to global warming. But here’s where we have good news; a few masterminds of the sustainable fashion industry took into consideration the magnitude of this waste and saw an opportunity. 

Single-use plastics and discarded fishing nets were among the first materials to be recycled into luxury products, but now it’s food waste that’s getting the sustainable spin. 

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US designer Mara Hoffman crafts all her buttons from tree nuts, while Hugo Boss and Veja sell sneakers made from repurposed pineapple leaves and corn starch, and Italian start-up Orange Fiber makes silk from scraps of citrus peel which has been used for Salvatore Ferragamo’s slinky floral printed scarves and dresses. 

The true pioneer of sustainable —and luxury— fashion is Stella McCartney who launched her eponymous line in 2001. 

instagram @stellamccartney

As one of the industry’s most vocal champions of environmental issues, McCartney is a strong example of the commercial potential of sustainable, ethically minded businesses. Sustainability —and an ethical standpoint— shapes the company’s policies, its underlying business model and its brand message.

Stella McCartney opted out of using animal-derived materials such as leather, silk, wool, etc. for ethical reasons as well as for the environmental impact their production causes. 

instagram @stellamccartney

The environmentally conscious brand makes buttery vegan leathers out of mushrooms. For spring/summer 2019, McCartney offered gauzy vests and T-shirts crafted from vegan silk made from yeast, and leather trousers in earthy mustards and burgundy hues.

Food waste is definitely on-trend right now.

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The huge luxury conglomerate who owns brands like Louis Vuitton, Christian Dior and Fendi —to name a few—LVMH, has teamed up with London charity Refettorio Felix for their ‘wine and spirits platform Clos19’ and host super fancy “supper clubs” where stellar chefs serve up three-course dinners using only waste produce — tickets cost £90, and each event sells out almost instantly. 

It’s a movement happening across different lifestyle categories from dining to beauty and fashion. “Food waste is definitely trending right now,” says Lisa Carolan, founder of the first waste-free wellness resort Our Retreat, in Sardinia; she introduced a waste-free policy after discovering that 1.3 billion tons of food is wasted annually. 

The growing demand for natural skincare and plastic-free packaging has seen the beauty industry wake up to waste too.

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Earlier this year, The Body Shop unveiled a collection of cleansers and moisturizers crafted from organic, “ugly” carrots that are too crooked to be sold in supermarkets. UK beauty brand, Cowshed, makes its packaging from repurposed sugar cane while London-based brands UpCircle and MontaMonta have both partnered with coffee shops across the British capital to turn used coffee grounds into scrubs and serums that are sold at Cult Beauty and Liberty. 

Fashion brands will find that if they choose to use food waste, ‘The supply of material is plentiful.’ 

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Data proving that 1.3 billion tons of food is wasted annually also predicts that the figure is expected to rise to 2.2 billion by 2025 —according to the United Nations. Other statistics say that one-third of the food grown or produced in the world is discarded. “The supply of material is plentiful,” says Tom Broughton, founder of London-based eyewear Cubitts and a pioneer in the design of sustainable eyewear. 

Cubitts produces opticals and sunglasses crafted from waste materials like corn husks and mushrooms. The specs even look like they’re made from wood, mais non, they’re made from corn starch. The brown finish is added from…wait for it… potatoes and coffee grounds. 

In recent years, as the fashion industry has started to acknowledge, and wake up to the impact it has on the planet —aka. being the second most polluting industry after oil production— sustainability has become a buzzword, and the only way out. It’s encouraging to see that brands are taking serious steps in innovation to mitigate their negative impact on the planet. And just as fashion brands and designers are opting to see the value in waste rather than the waste in it, consumers also need to take their share of responsibility and shop with awareness and ethics.

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First Crocs, Now Adidas: Bad Bunny To Launch Major Collaboration And Here’s What We Know So Far

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First Crocs, Now Adidas: Bad Bunny To Launch Major Collaboration And Here’s What We Know So Far

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It seems like 2020 has been the year of sneaker collaborations – or in Bad Bunny’s case – Crocs collaborations. From Bad Bunny to J Balvin, Travis Scott to Christian Dior, it seems that everyone is trying to get their name on a fresh pair of sneakers.

And I’m not complaining. I love a good shoe collaboration as much as the next guy, however, news of a possible Adidas and Bad Bunny collaborations has me extra excited since both of those are my favorites of their respective worlds. For me: Adidas is to the sneaker world what Bad Bunny is to reggaetón.

So far there haven’t been a lot of details released by either San Benito nor Adidas but this is what we do know.

Adidas x Bad Bunny will be releasing an epic sneaker collection early next year.

It’s just weeks after Bad Bunny’s custom Crocs basically broke the Internet and we’re already getting news (or at least rumors) of a possible Adidas x Bad Bunny collaboration happening soon. According to a story by Complex, Bad Bunny is about to bring more of his signature looks to your sneaker collection.

The Complex story says that a source familiar with the brand’s product plans for next year told them about the likely collab. However, neither Adidas nor Bad Bunny have announced the sneaker and wouldn’t confirm the project when reached for comment. If true though, the kicks would likely arrive as part of the sportswear brand’s Spring/Summer 2021 offerings.

In a photo Complex shared of the rumored sneaker, we get a possible first look at the soon-to-be sold out sneaker. The color palette featured on the Puerto Rican’s take on the Forum silhouette looks quite similar to his crocs with all-beige detailing that very well may also be glow-in-the-dark. The kicks seem to feature light blue design details on the sole and side sole of the shoes.

An Adidas x Bad Bunny collab will likely do as well or even better then his recent Crocs launch.

If rumors are true, the Forum would be El Conejo Malo’s first sneaker collaboration, although he already has a wildly-successful Crocs line that he released in September. And fans have proven themselves willing to go to great lengths to get their hands on Bad Bunny anything basically (myself included!).

The Crocs retail for $60 USD but are already being resold for more than $200 USD on sites like e-bay. Not to mention that the Crocs launch left many fans disappointed because of their instant success – the line sold out within minutes.

When the collab was initially announced, Bad Bunny called himself a “longtime fan” of the famous brand, adding that he hoped his version inspires his fans to “have their own fun with their personal style and wearing what makes them happy.”

He even got a little sentimental, adding: “I believe in being true and not placing limitations on myself, which is also something Crocs represents, and this is the message I always want to make sure I send out to my fans.”

For those of you who aren’t well-versed in Croc lingo, Jibbitz charms are jewelry-like flair you can pin through the holes of your Crocs. The Bad Bunny x Crocs Jibbits reference his music from his recent YHLQMDLG album–fire emojis, stars, planets, a man holding a sign that says: zona de perreo. And, of course, there was a bunny Jibbit as well.

It’s no secret that Bad Bunny is a sneaker lover.

In a 2018 episode of Sneaker Shopping on Complex, Bad Bunny explained his footwear history, saying that his native Puerto Rico was lacking in boutique stores.

“Ever since I was a child, I’ve liked sneakers,” Bad Bunny said then.

He’s not the only Latin trap artist that’s expected to release their own shoe soon. Colombian reggaeton star J Balvin said in an April interview with High Snobiety that his Air Jordan 1 collaboration was supposed to launch in November. Jordan Brand hasn’t confirmed this news.

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Nordstrom Has A New ‘Inclusive Beauty’ Category To Highlight Black-Owned Beauty Brands And It’s Where The Money Is At

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Nordstrom Has A New ‘Inclusive Beauty’ Category To Highlight Black-Owned Beauty Brands And It’s Where The Money Is At

Gallo Images / Contributor

If you’re looking to be more intentional about where you spend your cash, Nordstrom has just made your efforts to support Black-owned businesses easier.

The department store recently launched a new Inclusive Beauty online shopping category to highlight Black businesses. In a post to the site’s Inclusive Beauty landing page, Nordstrom encouraged users to “Check out these need-to-know Black-founded beauty brands that we’re proud to have in the Nordstrom family.” The new category includes beloved lines like  Brioge, Epara and Beauty Bakerie!

Even better, the Inclusive Beauty section features a wide range of makeup shades to suit all complexions as well as hair products like silk pillowcases, and hairpieces.

Check out some of the featured Black-owned Beauty brands below!

Bomba Curls Dominican Forbidden Hair Mask

$28NordstromSHOP NOW

Briogeo Repair Rituals Hair Care Set

Briogeo

$20NordstromSHOP NOW

Baby Tress 3-in-1 Edge Styler™ Tool Blush

Baby Tress

$15NordstromSHOP NOW

Epara Hydrating Mist

$56NordstromSHOP NOW

Beauty Bakerie Black Blending Egg Makeup Sponge Set

Beauty Bakerie

$18NordstromSHOP NOW

BeautyStat Universal C Eye Perfector Cream

$65NordstromSHOP NOW

Mantl Face + Scalp Invisible Daily SPF 30 Broad Spectrum

Mantil

$27NordstromSHOP NOW

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