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This Non-Profit Clothing Company Is Employing At-Risk Women In the Femicide Capital of Mexico

Photo: Manny Jorquera

The women of Juárez, Mexico refuse to be victimized. In the femicide capital of Mexico, feminist activists are taking their socio-economic power back.

Artists and activists Jane Terrazas, Lise Bjorne Linnert and Veronica Corchado have created a company called Ni En More, a not-for-profit clothing company aimed at providing jobs for at-risk women.

Photo: Manny Jorquera

The goal of Ni En More is to create jobs for women that will “provide dignity” and a “sustainable and fair income” but will also “create confidence and skills that contribute to long-term financial independence” for the women they employ. As of now, the company employs a total o f 16 women across the city.

Ni En More’s philosophy isn’t just lip service. The non-profit employs an array of Juárez women, from Indigenous members of the local Raramuri community, to women who have been subjected to domestic violence, to transgender women.

The women who work at Ni En More make bags, dresses, blouses, and most recently, face masks.

Photo: Manny Jorquera

They are trained in the ins-and-outs of the commercial apparel business, from pattern-cutting, to sewing, to quality-control, to shipping. According to the company’s website, their hope is that empowering women through ethical employment will have a ripple effect, spreading confidence “like seeds” across the town of Juárez. 

“Ni En More cannot alleviate the systematic social problems and the violence, but we can create better conditions for development and change,” Terrazas told Vogue. “We believe that economic independence for women is the first step in giving them the freedom they need to make decisions for themselves, thereby helping them face and defeat the challenges of abuse and violence.”

The city of Juárez’s violence stems from its status as a border-town riddled with drug lords and cartels.

Photo: Manny Jorquera
Photo: Manny Jorquera

According to local El Paso news, 1500 people were killed in Juárez in 2019–an average of 4 people per day. The violence in Juárez is pervasive, and women are at the receiving end of a very particular kind of violence: gender-based crime. 

Like Susan Chavez Castillo, a poet and activist whose work inspired the company’s name. Chavez Castillo is widely credited as coining the slogan “Ni Una Menos”. She was actively outspoken about the plague of femicide that was crippling her city as well as her country. In 2011, she was murdered.

“What’s strange is that we’re fighting to eliminate femicide in Juárez,” her friend Linda Meza told the Denver Post at the time. “And look, she died that way, in the hands of criminals.”

But even as feminists are martyred for the cause, the fight to end femicide wages on. And sometimes, the biggest changes come from the places you’d least expect–like a not-for-profit clothing company.

Photo: Manny Jorquera
Photo: Manny Jorquera

“We are not a fashion brand,” Terrazas told Vogue, explaining that the apparel they sell are “symbols” in the larger fight against gender-based violence. “Our garments are conceived in order to create awareness, fairness, and hope.”

Buy from Ni En More and support the fight against femicide here.

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Mare Advertencia Lirika’s Rap Game Is An Ode To Social Resistance

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Mare Advertencia Lirika’s Rap Game Is An Ode To Social Resistance

mare.advertencia.lirika / Instagram

In Oaxaca, Mexico the hip-hop scene is dominated by men. Influenced by early ’90s American rap artists, most lyrics are misogynistic; a commonality in past and present wrap.

As a feminist uprising fuels the country, female rappers like Mare Advertencia Lirika utilize the depth hip-hop activism can have on social justice.

Growing up listening to banda, Lirika became exposed to American hip-hop when she was 12.

Although a fan, her language barrier impacted her resonance with the genre. After hearing Mexican rap groups like Caballeros de Plan G and Vieja Guardia, her spark for rap reignited.

“The history of rap is a mix of so many things that it gives room for anyone to fit into it,” she told Refinery29.

At 16, her rap career took off.

Under a machismo culture where women are often told ‘calladita te ves más bonita,’ Lirika defies outdated standards.

In her latest feminist anthem “Que Mujer,” she encourages women to rise up against patriarchal rhetorics.

With passion and prowess, her bona fide representation of class and gender struggles echo marginalized communities disenfranchised by systems of power.

Femicide rates in Mexico are rampant, having doubled in the last five years. On average 10 women are killed every day, but due to unreliable data and systematic impunity, many cases go under-investigated.

Oaxaca is a hot spot for violence, a reality Lirika knows too well. When she was five, her father was murdered resulting in the circumstantial feminist upbringing that fueled her vocality. Raised by her mother, grandmother and aunts, witnessing women take charge in making tough decisions helped to normalize her outspokenness.

Her feminist upbringing made her the strong woman she is today.

Identifying as Zapotec, an indigenous community native to Oaxaca, Lirika’s potent lyrics pay homage to her matriarchal upbringing and social resistance.

In “¿Y Tú Qué Esperas?” Lirika’s hearty alto sound shines as she asks that women speak and live their truth.

In songs like “Se Busca” she renders a poignant message demanding the return of those who have been kidnapped. Her visuals further amplify the severity of the issue as she raps, “cada persona que no está es un ausencia que no sana.”

Unafraid of confrontation, her cutthroat verses and poeticism are visceral.

Listening to her beats feel reminiscent of old-school rap, making it almost impossible to not nod along to her intellectual wit. Fusing the melodies of cumbias and reggae among others, she spits bars that sound the alarm of revolution.

But hostility towards women in the Oaxaca rap scene still lingers.

“Most people still think that women aren’t compatible with rap and think that we are wasting our time,” she told The New York Times in 2018. “We have to continue to show up at shows because it gives us confidence to see other women rap and to show people that we can also do this.”

Perhaps one of the best known Oaxaca rappers Lirika, 34, has established herself as a prominent figure in the genre. But her call to action is just beginning.

“My life context has taught me that I can use my voice,” she told Refinery29. “And maybe that’s a privilege of mine, one I shouldn’t have, but I trust very much what I have to say. I don’t fear what I have to say.”

READ: Latinas Talk About Learning Of The Heartbreaking Colonization Of Indigenous Land And The Genocide Of Its People

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7 Five-Star Reviewed Plus-Sized Bathing Suits On Etsy

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7 Five-Star Reviewed Plus-Sized Bathing Suits On Etsy

LOIC VENANCE / Getty

Summer is just around the corner! Which means that it’s time to break out the bikinis and go “skimpy” dipping. Here’s where our list below comes in. Of course, it might seem easier to head over to a big box store like Nordstrom or Target to find your next favorite piece for the summer, but why not support a small business doing the work on Etsy?

We put together a list of top-rated bikini items on Etsy.

Check them out below!

Criss cross bandage suit

LILYSHdesign

Five star and 1,047 sales|Price: $149.00

This top selling swimsuit can be worn both as a swimsuit and paired with skirts and bottoms.

But it here.

Backless Monokini Swimsuit

BlackMintRose

Five star 23 sales|Price: $29.99

This handmade multi color printed high waist swimsuit bikini is perfect with the chica with curves and summer rays on her mind.

But it here.

Sweet swim dress

HerinDesignStudio

Five star 142 sales|Price: $92.00

Combining comfort and style this swimsuit is perfect for the swimmer on the go!

But it here.

Multicolor Stripe Halter Neck One Piece

BlackMintRose

23 sales|Price: $39.99

This handmade multicolor halter top swimsuit is beyond perfect for the LGTBQ proud and or the chica awaiting her hot girl summer. According to one reviewer, the piece is well-made and the seller ships items fast!

But it here.

Blocking High-waisted Two-piece

BlackMintRose

23 sales|Price: $39.99

Handmade and created with flattering colors, this high-waisted two-piece will do more than accentuate your best assets. It’ll have you standing out in the waves!

But it here.

Navy Gingham Reversible High Waist Bikini Set

byswim

224 sales|Price: $65.00

This high-waisted bottom and high neck crop top can be swapped for both the top and or bottom for various looks. Go for gingham or a solid color, either way, you’ll be rocking a classic summer look!

But it here.

Personalized Panama Triangle Reversible Top

byswim

224 sales|Price

Reviewers describe this set as being versatile and comfy to wear. The set is reversible so you can 4 different bathing suit looks in one!

but it here.

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