Fierce

This Non-Profit Clothing Company Is Employing At-Risk Women In the Femicide Capital of Mexico

Photo: Manny Jorquera

The women of Juárez, Mexico refuse to be victimized. In the femicide capital of Mexico, feminist activists are taking their socio-economic power back.

Artists and activists Jane Terrazas, Lise Bjorne Linnert and Veronica Corchado have created a company called Ni En More, a not-for-profit clothing company aimed at providing jobs for at-risk women.

Photo: Manny Jorquera

The goal of Ni En More is to create jobs for women that will “provide dignity” and a “sustainable and fair income” but will also “create confidence and skills that contribute to long-term financial independence” for the women they employ. As of now, the company employs a total o f 16 women across the city.

Ni En More’s philosophy isn’t just lip service. The non-profit employs an array of Juárez women, from Indigenous members of the local Raramuri community, to women who have been subjected to domestic violence, to transgender women.

The women who work at Ni En More make bags, dresses, blouses, and most recently, face masks.

Photo: Manny Jorquera

They are trained in the ins-and-outs of the commercial apparel business, from pattern-cutting, to sewing, to quality-control, to shipping. According to the company’s website, their hope is that empowering women through ethical employment will have a ripple effect, spreading confidence “like seeds” across the town of Juárez. 

“Ni En More cannot alleviate the systematic social problems and the violence, but we can create better conditions for development and change,” Terrazas told Vogue. “We believe that economic independence for women is the first step in giving them the freedom they need to make decisions for themselves, thereby helping them face and defeat the challenges of abuse and violence.”

The city of Juárez’s violence stems from its status as a border-town riddled with drug lords and cartels.

Photo: Manny Jorquera
Photo: Manny Jorquera

According to local El Paso news, 1500 people were killed in Juárez in 2019–an average of 4 people per day. The violence in Juárez is pervasive, and women are at the receiving end of a very particular kind of violence: gender-based crime. 

Like Susan Chavez Castillo, a poet and activist whose work inspired the company’s name. Chavez Castillo is widely credited as coining the slogan “Ni Una Menos”. She was actively outspoken about the plague of femicide that was crippling her city as well as her country. In 2011, she was murdered.

“What’s strange is that we’re fighting to eliminate femicide in Juárez,” her friend Linda Meza told the Denver Post at the time. “And look, she died that way, in the hands of criminals.”

But even as feminists are martyred for the cause, the fight to end femicide wages on. And sometimes, the biggest changes come from the places you’d least expect–like a not-for-profit clothing company.

Photo: Manny Jorquera
Photo: Manny Jorquera

“We are not a fashion brand,” Terrazas told Vogue, explaining that the apparel they sell are “symbols” in the larger fight against gender-based violence. “Our garments are conceived in order to create awareness, fairness, and hope.”

Buy from Ni En More and support the fight against femicide here.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Here Are The 2021 Fashion And Style Goals To Expect

Fierce

Here Are The 2021 Fashion And Style Goals To Expect

Thomas Barwick // Getty

Funny to think that around this time last year so many of us were all eagerly pouring over the Spring and Summer fashion lines in anticipation of what to wear. So young and naive. So far away from the world of COVID and quarantine and sweat pants. And this year it shows! In 2021, designers have turned out lines inspired by our new work-from-home routine. Here are some 2021 Fashion And Style Goals. You must follow

It’s not just designers aiming for WFH safe fashion.

Redditors also have their minds filled with fashion on their mind.

Check them out below!

“My goal is to only buy pieces I actually love. No shopping because I’m sad or bored. Secondary goal is to donate or throw away things that I don’t wear. Some clothes is super old and only holds up as pyjamas, some clothes is just …not me anymore, idk? Also learning about how to care for expensive pieces!” –friendlyRaven98

“Learn how to dress a body that is 90 pounds lighter. I’ve never shopped in straight sized stores and I don’t even know what brands I’d like. Up until now I’ve been forced to make do with what was available at torrid, lane Bryant, etc. and always felt pigeon holed into a certain “style” because that’s all that was available or thats what was expected for plus size people to wear.” – threeswordstyle

“2021 I’m making an effort. I can be a middle-aged mom, and not be frumpy. 2020 I started out fine, but working from home and covid I sort of gave up. I stopped doing my hair, and stopped putting on makeup. I stopped exercising (yoga pants and hoodies are so forgiving. Not to mention sports bras and cotton undies rather than sexy lingerie that made me stand up a little bit straighter and smile that secret smile to myself. ) I can be chubbier than I’d like right now, and still have nice style that makes me feel sexy and attractive and good about how I present myself. I can wear cute shoes and accessorize again, even if I have a mask that covers my smile. I can also take care of myself and enjoy exercise and healthy foods, and get to a place where I feel better about my body in a swimsuit.” –LittleBunnyF00f

“I decluttered A LOT this year , several garbage bags full of clothes I don’t wear / don’t like wearing , so my goal is to do a slow but carefully thought out overhaul. I’m going to start with super basic pieces and replacing my jeans for higher quality ones then move from there. This is likely going to take place in the second half of the year though because I’m currently paying off credit cards, so we’ll see!” –Sweatypotatosack

“My style goals for 2021:

  1. Be more creative with my style. I want to wear my more funky and unique pieces more often, and to make some of my pieces more personal by embroidering them with cool designs.
  2. Shop my closet. I probably have about 60 pieces all together including accessories (I know this from my Stylebook app) and I’ve realized that I can combine them in all sorts of new ways to create many different kinds of outfits.
  3. Take videos of my crafted outfits. This has helped me a lot in seeing what is working on me and what needs a few tweaks. For example, I took a video of myself wearing a tucked in fitted turtleneck with high-waisted jeans and a belt. I felt it looked very nice in the mirror, but for some reason, it looked off in the video. I quickly realized that due to my height, my high-rise jeans weren’t hitting me at my natural waist, but were instead fitting closer to a mid rise. After noticing this, I experimented around with what I had, and settled on adding a unique 80’s jacket which made it look a lot more styled and proportionate.” –AppleGirl341

“I’m going on a super low buy for 2021. There’s a chance that I have to move at the end of the year so I want to pair down my stuff (less boxes to pack). I’m allowed one item per month in the following categories (with exceptions carved out). This is one item PERIOD, not one shirt and one lipstick. I can either get the shirt or the lipstick. Makeup, clothing (including bras, underwear, and socks), accessories, shoes (can replace only worn out athletic shoes), tech including headphones/charging cables (can replace my laptop or phone should they die), books, craft supplies (unless I get a custom Etsy order and need something for it), stationary/office supplies (I can only buy a 2022 planner). I’m really trying to fast-track the “financial goals’ portion of my budget and I’m hoping this low-buy shifts my habits and diverts money from “wants” to financial goals.” –crazycatlady331

“I’m pretty much always torn between different aesthetics and I don’t really see that changing, but I definitely only want to buy things that I 100% like and that fit me. I usually thrift and I have some items that are lovely, but just one or two sizes too big, I’ll keep them and wear them with belts or get them altered, but I don’t wanna keep buying things that are pretty, but not my size.” –kirisakis

“My realistic goal is to not shop new at all and really limit shopping secondhand. I’m going to not shop when bored or stressed (not too hard to do, since I’m not really going out at the moment due to covid, obviously, and online shopping doesn’t give me the same boost). I almost set a no-buy for myself, but I know myself well enough to know that if I slip once, I’ll consider the whole thing a wash and go crazy. So I’m “allowing” second hand purchases, but I really intend to try and limit even those. Dream goal is to take sewing lessons and learn how to make my own clothes. I realize I need actual in-person help with this, as I’ve tried youtube and other online tutorials and I just can’t. I need to be able to ask questions and get feedback. So if things get better, I’m looking at this summer finding a class or teacher to start. This has been like a fifteen year goal, though. I am somehow making it happen in 2021!!” –violetmemphisblue

“Contrary to others I’m actually trying to buy more! I’ve always been super picky with my clothes and have had a barebones wardrobe since high school. This is the first time I’ve had a job where I have a lot of freedom in what I can wear, and it just feels like I’m wearing the same stuff all the time (I am).” –toa2tcat

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Radical Feminists Have Seized Control of a Federal Building in Mexico in Protest of the Government’s Apathy Towards Rampant Femicide

Things That Matter

Radical Feminists Have Seized Control of a Federal Building in Mexico in Protest of the Government’s Apathy Towards Rampant Femicide

Last week, Mexican feminist activists took over the National Human Rights Commissions federal building in a move to bring greater awareness to the scourge of gender-based violence and femicide that has racked Mexico for decades.

According to the federal Interior Secretariat, the statistics in Mexico have recently taken a turn for the worse.

Domestic violence against women has became an even more acute problem since the pandemic has forced women to stay insider with their abusers. Emergency distress calls reporting domestic violence have risen by 50%.

The occupation of the Human Rights building is just another chapter in the saga of the “Ni Una Menos” (Not One More Woman) movement, an anti-femicide collective born in Argentina that has steadily been gaining steam in Mexico since 2019.

In recent years, anti-femicide demonstrations have been sparked by various heinous crimes against women or girls that have been largely overlooked by law enforcement officials. 

Photo by Marcos Brindicci/Getty Images

Unfortunately, the government of Mexico has appeared to be apathetic to the wave of femicide that is overwhelming the women of their country.

Recently, when President Andrés Manuel López Obrador was asked to address Mexico’s gender violence epidemic, he demurred, stating that he didn’t “want femicide to detract” from the raffle his administration was holding for the sale of the presidential airplane.

As for the feminist activists at the heart of Ni Una Menos and the federal building occupation, the government’s failure to respond to anti-woman violence is the primary fuel for their anger. 

“We’re here so that the whole world will know that in Mexico they kill women and nobody does anything about it,” said Yesenia Zamudio to the LA Times. According to Zamudio, she is still seeking justice for the murder of her 19-year-old daughter four years ago.

The women of Mexico appear to be fed up, grasping at any and all tactics that have the potential to incite change on a grander scale.

Their tactics may seem dramatic to some, but it’s undeniable that they are no longer being ignored. As of now, the radical activists are pulling attention-grabbing stunts like decorating a portrait of Mexican Revolution leader Francisco Madero with lipstick and purple hair.

They’re also making headlines for vandalizing the federal building’s walls and splashing paint on the doors of the presidential palace.

One thing is for sure: something has to change. Otherwise, thousands of innocent women and girls will continue to be raped, abused, and murdered while their perpetrators escape with immunity. 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com