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Four Year Old Left Blind After She Caught A Severe Case Of The Flu—Her Parents Have A Message: Get Your Child Vaccinated

A 4-year-old Iowa girl was blinded and nearly died after catching the flu, according to a report—and her parents said doctors don’t know if she will ever see again. Jade DeLucia, who didn’t receive a flu shot this season, got sick a few days before Christmas and spent nearly two weeks in the intensive care unit at the University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital.

Jade DeLucia’s mother took her to the hospital on Christmas Eve when her fever became dangerously high.

www.gofundme.com

“I looked down at her and her eyes were in the back of her head,” Jade’s mom Amanda Phillips told NBC News. The four-year-old spent more than two weeks in the hospital, her mom said, and developed a disease called encephalopathy, a swelling of the brain that caused her to lose her vision.

This encephalopathy complication is not just relatively rare, it’s very, very rare; .21 per million is about 1 in 5 million.

www.gofundme.com

Doctors told Phillips they won’t know if her daughter’s vision loss is permanent for six months. “She is lucky to be alive,” one of her doctors, Theresa Czech, told CNN last week. “She’s a little fighter. And I think she’s super lucky.”

The parents rushed Jade to the hospital — where she began to have a seizure, they told the New York Post.

Amanda Phillips facebook.com

Jade began to feel ill Dec. 19. Her symptoms progressed until the morning of Christmas Eve, when her dad Stephen DeLucia went to check on her and found her in bed unresponsive, with her body burning hot, the outlet reported. “I was like, ‘We have to go. We have to go to the emergency room. This isn’t right. Something’s not right with her,” mom Amanda Phillips recalled.

On Christmas Day, they found out Jade was suffering from encephalopathy.

Amanda Phillips facebook.com

“They said she had significant brain damage. They said our child might not ever wake up, and if she did, she might not ever be the same,” Phillips said. Czech, a pediatric neurologist, diagnosed Jade with acute necrotizing encephalopathy, or ANE, a type of encephalopathy usually caused by a viral infection. She prescribed steroids to help with the swelling in her brain.

Eventually, on Jan. 1, Jade woke up and began to get gradually better over the next few days.

Amanda Phillips facebook.com

But then, Phillips noticed that Jade wouldn’t look at her favorite stuffed animal, a white unicorn, even when it was in front of her face. “[The flu] affected the part of her brain that perceives sight, and we don’t know if she’s going to get her vision back,” said Czech.

Her parents have a message: Get your child vaccinated.

Amanda Phillips facebook.com

Phillips said she got her daughter vaccinated last March, and hoped that would work for the current season, but doctors say it’s crucial to get the vaccine in the fall before each season. “If I can stop one child from getting sick, that’s what I want to do,” said Amanda Phillips. “It’s terrible to see your child suffer like this.”

Every year, dozens of children die from the flu, and most of them had not received a flu shot, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Amanda Phillips facebook.com

Thousands more children are hospitalized. Many of those who becomes seriously ill or died were perfectly healthy before they contracted the flu. Jade is one of them.

This season’s flu strains are hitting children particularly hard, the Center for Disease Control said Friday.

https://twitter.com/CDCFlu/status/1215689262332551175?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1215689262332551175&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nbcnews.com%2Fhealth%2Fcold-and-flu%2Fseason-s-2-prominent-flu-strains-hitting-kids-young-particularly-n1113446

Two different flu strains are widespread, and there are twice as many pediatric flu deaths so far this year than at the same time last year, the CDC said.

The agency estimates that at least 9.7 million people have had the flu this season, with 87,000 hospitalizations and 4,800 deaths reported so far.

https://twitter.com/CDCFlu/status/1216751219215097858

Phillips hopes Jade’s story gets parents to take the flu seriously. “You do what’s best for your children,” she said. “You know your children.”

A GoFundMe page has been set up to help with Jade’s medical costs.

Amanda Phillips facebook.com

As for little Jade, she’s now at home recovering with her family at her side. On January 9 Phillips posted: ‘We are home. Words I didn’t think I’d get to post for weeks to come. But, here she is. My sweet baby girl…My brave girl who cannot see but is so loved by so many.’

Latinos In New York City Face More Layoffs Than Non-Latino Peers

Things That Matter

Latinos In New York City Face More Layoffs Than Non-Latino Peers

Bytemarks / Flickr

The country is witnessing a high amount of mass layoffs across several industries in the face of the COVID-19 outbreak. Last week, 3.3 million Americans filed for unemployment, the highest number in history. Economists anticipate a 20 percent unemployment rate in the United States and some cities are already feeling the impact of these layoffs. In New York City, Latinos are facing more layoffs than their peers.

Latinos in New York City are facing higher levels of unemployment caused by COVID-19.

MSNBC Legal Analyst Maya Wiley tweeted about the foreseeable disproportionate impact these layoffs would have on minority communities. The tweet is ringing true as 41 percent of Latinos in NYC have been laid off from their jobs in response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

The Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy of the City University of New York conducted a survey with 1,000 participants. The survey found that roughly 4 out of every 10 Latinos in NYC have lost their job or someone in their household lost their job due to the health crisis. The survey found that 24 percent of white and Asian employees and 15 percent of Black employees reported losing jobs.

“It’s likely because the Hispanic community, many are in service jobs like restaurants or hotels,” Professor Scott Ratzan, a senior scholar at CUNY SPH, who led the survey, said in a statement. “We do the survey in English and Spanish, and [job loss is] higher among the Spanish-speaking community.” 

New York is the hardest-hit state in the U.S. with more than 30,000 confirmed cases of the virus.

New York state is facing the most extreme outbreak of the novel coronavirus when compared to the rest of the country. Governor Andrew Cuomo delivers an address to the media every morning and has told New Yorkers to brace for a serious viral outbreak. More than 30,000 New Yorkers have tested positive for COVID-19 and 325 deaths. Around 20,000 of those cases and about 280 of those deaths are in NYC.

Gov. Cuomo shared data that showed how the measures New York has taken to slow the spread is contributing to a slowing hospitalization rate. According to The New York Times, the hospitalization rate in New York state is slowing. On Sunday, the governor shared stat showing the rate doubling every two days. By Thursday, new data shows the hospitalization rate doubling every 4.7 days.

There are resources available for New Yorkers who are losing their jobs during the outbreak.

Some New Yorkers are reporting some delays in getting a hold of people in the unemployment offices. While the waits are long, it is worth being persistent.

According to NYC Emergency Management, there are several options for people who are being laid off during the COVID-19 pandemic. Unemployment assistance is available to everyone in New York state and the state has waived the 7-day wait period to alleviate the added pressures of COVID-19. Employees should know about the Shared Work program offered as an alternative to worker layoffs that provides some income assistance while workers have to work a reduced schedule.

The Office of Nightlife is also asking nightlife employees to fill out a survey about lost income in an attempt to help contractors, performers, workers, and business owners impacted by the closures.

READ: Latinas Are Sharing How They Protect Their Loved Ones From Coronavirus

Someone Turned Cardi B’s Coronavirus Rant Into A Remix Now It’s On The Billboard Charts

Entertainment

Someone Turned Cardi B’s Coronavirus Rant Into A Remix Now It’s On The Billboard Charts

Cardi B/ Instagram

Who knew Cardi B’s rants could be music to someone’s ears.

If you haven’t already heard, Cardi B went one very long Instagram rant about the Coronavirus pandemic and its global repercussions. Last Wednesday, the Dominican rapper posted a 46-second video on Instagram airing out her fears and grievances about the disease. Towards the end of the clip Cardi B delivered the lines “Coronavirus! S*** is real! S*** is getting real!”

Now it’s Billboard hit.

Over the weekend, the Brooklyn-based DJ iMarkkeyz chopped up the soundbite and released a track called “Coronavirus.” The bit has Cardi B’s rant on loop as a trap beat plays beneath it. It didn’t take long for “Coronavirus” to take off– the song we mean. The song broke into the pop charts internationally in Bulgaria and Brazil over the weekend and eventually began to climb the ranks of iTunes. By Thursday the song was top 10 in the United States iTunes chart.

You might think the song’s virality is just another schtick but uh uh.

Cardi B and iMarkkeyz have pledged to donate proceeds from streams and downloads to go towards those affected by Coronavirus.

According to Billboard “As preliminary reports indicated, the remixed tune ‘Coronavirus’ sold 3,000 copies in the week ending March 19, according to Nielsen Music/MRC Data. The sales total prompts a No. 9 debut on Billboard’s Rap Digital Song Sales and a No. 13 start on the R&B/Hip-Hop Digital Song Sales charts dated March 28. In addition, ‘Coronavirus’ picked up 626,000 U.S. on-demand streams in the same period”

Check out the new hit below!