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Olympic Gymnast Laurie Hernandez’s Former Coach Suspended By USA Gymnastics For Abuse

It’s a well-known fact that the world of gymnastics can be particularly grueling. Gymnasts are often subjected to long hours of intense workouts, immense pressure to compete, and the high likelihood of sustaining injuries. It’s all part of the sport and what makes elite gymnasts like Laurie Hernandez so inspiring.

What women like Hernandez, do not sign up for however is the culture of abuse pervasive in the gymnastics world. Recently, USA Gymnastics has seen a period of years in which instances of abuse have come to light. In 2018, in fact, Lawrence Gerard Nassar, a former USA Gymnastics national team doctor and osteopathic physician, was sentenced to prison for his sexual abuse of minors who were gymnasts and patients of his. As part of his conviction, many gymnasts were quick to point out that the toxic and abusive nature of certain coaches allowed such abuse to happen. As it turns out while Hernandez never came forward to make a claim against Nassar she has recently made one about her gymnastics coach.

Maggie Haney, a gymnastics coach who trained Hernandez during the 2016 Olympics, has been suspended by USA Gymnastics.

USA Gymnastics decided that she would be suspected for a period of eight years for her part in verbal and emotional abuse of athletes. According to reports, once the suspension period is over Haney will be permitted to reapply for membership.

“The independent hearing panel — comprised of three members of the gymnastics community, including an attorney, a club owner, and a former national team athlete — found that Ms. Haney violated the USA Gymnastics Code of Ethical Conduct, Safe Sport Policy, and other policies,” the organization told People.com in a statement.

Hernandez spoke out about the abuse in an Instagram post shared to her page.

Hernandez, who won a gold and a silver medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics, testified against Haney throughout a series of months of hearings which involved other gymnasts who trained under Haney.

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The Adopted Mother And Father Of Two Was Accused Of Abuse — Now Police Have Discovered That An Additional Child In Their Care Has Not Been Seen in Years

Things That Matter

The Adopted Mother And Father Of Two Was Accused Of Abuse — Now Police Have Discovered That An Additional Child In Their Care Has Not Been Seen in Years

Stephen Ellison / Twitter

A recent investigation looking into the allegations of child abuse of two adoptive parents has just taken a surprising turn.

In a news release shared by police earlier this week, it was revealed that police recently learned of the eight to ten-year-long disappearance of a teen girl named Kaya Centeno while investigating allegations of child abuse carried out by her adoptive parents. Centeno’s siblings — a brother who is aged 15, and a sister who is 17 — had reported that their parents had abused them. It wasn’t until the two children were taken into police custody that they told police that Kaya went missing from their family home in Rohnert Park sometime between 2010 and 2012. The siblings went onto tell the police that her disappearance occurred at the same time that they began to endure alleged emotional, sexual, and physical abuse by their adopted parents, Gina and Jose Centeno.

The Centeno’s adopted all three children in 2008.

Gina and Jose Centeno, were arrested on August 19 after police found evidence to corroborate the abuse claims.

The Centeno’s were arrested on August 19 for aggravated kidnapping after they fled to Mexico Centeneo almost 18 months ago.

According to Sonoma County jail records the couple has been booked on numerous charges, including nine felony charges related to the sexual abuse of the 17-year-old girl by who Jose. According to Press Democrat, the 17-year-old girl is identified as Jane Doe No. 1 in a complaint that was filed in Sonoma County Superior Court.

According to People, the couple is being held without bond and it is not known whether or not they have entered pleas or obtained attorneys.

“Rohnert Park detectives received a tip July 24 about the alleged abuse in their city by Child Protective Services workers, who had been in contact with authorities in Mexico, where the 15- and 17-year-old had been placed in protective custody after alleging abuse by the parents,” reports People.

According to reports, detectives and the FBI worked with CPS and the U.S. Embassy to bring the two siblings to Sonoma County. It was during this time that the two siblings mentioned the disappearance of their older sister, Kaya.

“The children said Kaya went missing from their Rohnert Park home approximately eight to 10 years ago and she has not been heard from or seen since,” said the police.

According to police, at the time of Kaya’s disappearance, she was in second grade at the John Reed School in Rohnert Park but was withdrawn. Her adoptive parents claimed that she was going to be homeschooled.

If you or anyone you know has information about the current case please call the Rohnert Park Department of Public Safety at 707-584-2612, or the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at 1-800-843-5678 (1-800-THE-LOST).

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The Climbing Cholitas Of Bolivia Scale Mountains In Skirts And Snow

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The Climbing Cholitas Of Bolivia Scale Mountains In Skirts And Snow

Great Big Story/ Youtube

In the capital city of La Paz, Bolivia 11 Indigenous women have set out to climb higher than the sexist expectations of their world. The women come from an Indigenous group known for their bowler hats and brightly ornate clothing. They call themselves the Cholita Climbers and they’re willing to go to great heights to reach their dreams.

Up until recently, the Bolivian Aymara women worked as cooks and caretakers for wealthy families, men, and mountaineers from across the globe.

According to the Guardian, the women worked on high-altitude camps for years helping crews setting out to reach the highest peaks of the Andes. One day, the women decided to strap on crampons (shoes that are necessary for traveling on glaciers, snow slopes, and frozen waterfalls) and scale the mountains on their own.

While “Chola” is often interpreted as a derogatory term for indigenous women in certain Spanish-speaking countries, the Climbing Cholitas have taken back the word and found power in it. As a group (whose members range from 24 to 52 years old), the women weather the dangers of icy mountain terrains while holding on to ice axes and wearing their traditional dresses.

In some incredible pictures taken of the woman, they can be seen wearing colorful dresses called polleras.

The women have set out to climb the highest peaks in South America, including Aconcagua. For the time being, they’re setting their sights on scaling eight mountains higher than 19,700 ft.

Speaking about their experiences Dora Magueño, a 50-year-old member of the group, told the Guardian that she cried when she first climbed Huyana Potsí. “I’m strong, I’m going to continue and get to the top of eight mountains.”

Ultimately, the group wants to steak a Bolivian flag on the summit of Aconcagua. The mountain is located in the Argentinian Andes near the border with Chile.

Check out a video of the women below!

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