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This Mom Got Asked Out While Working And She Just Couldn’t Help Herself

One thing that is definitely true about Latina moms is they are pros at multitasking. They can be cooking and watching the kids at the same time or cleaning and simultaneously be scolding you too. Where does this come from, and how can we attain this skill? If you’d like further proof of this magic that Latina moms possess, look no further than this brilliant woman who can hustle and score a date in less than two minutes flat.

Meet Laura Cisneros, a stylish mom who hustles as a Mary Kay rep.

Credit: Instagram/@cisneros7546

Cisneros takes her job very seriously, which is why she’s an excellent Mary Kay rep. “I truly believe that serving customers is one of the great factors that sets us apart from every other company,” Cisneros states on her company’s website. She’s so serious about selling Mary Kay products that it seems she’s willing to reach out to her customers at the drop of a dime, even if she’s in her car.

Cisneros was recently conducting a live Mary Kay seminar in her car, and while she was speaking to her followers, a man approached her, and straight-up asked her on a date.

Credit: Twitter/@ChabelyyBD

“Sorry to interrupt,” the stranger says in the video. “My name is Leon.” Cisneros is clearly taken aback by this person who just approached her car while doing a live chat. He goes on to say, “I just thought you were way, bonita.” So, apparently, he knows some Spanish. He asks her where she’s from (she says Mexico) and what she’s doing (working!! what else!!??). He then just goes in for the kill (not like that).

The stranger says, “sorry to be so forward, but, can I have your number?” She says yes, and it takes her a hot minute to locate her business card.

Credit: Twitter/@ChabelyyBD

The two make some small talk including exchanging information about where she lives and whether it would be okay if he called her to go on a date, maybe grab a drink. She, again says, yes, to call me. Perhaps he didn’t hear her the first time? So she gives him her card, and he leaves, and what does she do? Go back to her live seminar. Classic!

“Sorry, Chicas,” Cisneros says about the minor interruption of her live seminar.

Credit: Twitter/@ChabelyyBD

Yeah, they didn’t seem to mind.

Her daughter shared this hilarious encounter on Twitter, and it has been shared more than 30,000 times.

Credit: Twitter/@ChabelyyBD

Her daughter said now that her mom’s video has gone viral they’re planning to make shirts out of her mom’s signature closing statement, “sorry, chicas.”

Cisneros is so popular now that she launched her own Twitter account!

Her daughter tweeted, “My mom really enjoyed everyone’s support, so she activated her twitter, the one and only go follow her @analauracisner4,” and added, “@MaryKay, please make my mom an ambassador or shareholder because business is booming honey.”

A few months ago, her daughter posted this sweet tribute to her mom on her birthday.

Credit: Instagram/@chabelybris

“Where to begin…as I grew older, I learned about your struggles growing up and as young women. From being a young mom dependent on my dad with no English to being fully independent and successfully running her own business, I admire your resilience and strength. You taught me how to be a mother, how to love unconditionally, how to be loyal. You’re an amazing grandmother and the best mom, happy birthday queen.”

But we know what you’re thinking. Did the mystery man ever call her?

Credit: Instagram/@cisneros7546

No, he has not!  What the heck? All that game for nothing. What a typical guy! Right when you think a confident man comes along to ask out an ambitious, hard-working Latina, he goes on to be a letdown. So basic. Her daughter offers up this theory, “No, he hasn’t called yet maybe he saw this and got scared.” Maybe! It would make so much sense because it is so common for a guy to be intimidated by an incredible woman. Well, it’s his loss because he clearly is missing out.

Don’t worry, Laura, we do not doubt that you’ll be scoring more dates and profitable opportunities thanks to this viral tweet.

READ: 21 Beauty Products Our Latina Moms Forced On Us In The ’90s

Major Investigation Reveals That Most Popular Dating Apps Aren’t Keeping Users Safe From Sex Offenders

Things That Matter

Major Investigation Reveals That Most Popular Dating Apps Aren’t Keeping Users Safe From Sex Offenders

Unsplash

A 16-month investigation conducted by Columbia Journalism Investigations found that the Match Group which owns 45 popular dating apps like Tinder, Plenty of Fish, and OK Cupid does not screen for sexual offenders. Match Group does audit users for sex crimes on their namesake property Match.com, but admits that on its free platforms it expects users to police themselves. 

The CJI report found that the policy leaves users vulnerable to sexual assault, and multiple victims have reported rapes because of it. Tinder, the company’s most successful app, has 5.2 million subscribers. Altogether Match Group is worth $1.7 billion in revenue. Many feel the publicly-traded company owes its subscribers more protection. 

Susan Deveau says her Plenty of Fish date raped her. 

When 54-year-old Deveau met Mark Papamechail on Plenty of Fish in 2016, she had no way of knowing he was a three-time convicted rapist. In Massachusetts, he was listed as a dangerous registered sex offender. After going on several dates, Deveau reported to the police that Papamechail raped her. She was the second woman to report Papamechail for rape after meeting him on a dating app. 

According to the app’s terms of use subscribers must “promise” they haven’t committed a felony, sex crime, or violent crime by agreeing to it. Thus the only method of screening is an honor system that assumes any user would actually read through the lengthy agreement. The company does not try to verify or screen for whether users are being honest or not. 

There’s a reason why Match.com screens for registered sex offenders.

Before Match Group bought up its competitors and became publicly traded, it agreed to screen for sex crimes on its flagship property Match.com. When the company expanded it didn’t extend this policy to its catalog of 45 apps. Match.com only agreed to check its users against the government’s sex offender registries after a public complaint from Carole Markin in 2011.

Markin says she was raped by a man she met on the platform on their second date. Afterward, she discovered he was convicted of rape six times. Markin was able to make her lawsuit public having been an entertainment executive herself. Under pressure, Match.com’s lawyers revealed they had begun implementing the screening process that utilized the government registries. Eventually, Markin settled.

A Match Group spokesperson told CJI that the free platforms don’t collect enough data to create a uniform screening policy. 

“There are definitely registered sex offenders on our free products,” the spokesperson said

CJI found at least 157 incidents of sexual assault across dating apps. 

Most of the assaults happened within the last 5 years. Almost all of the victims were women who met their attackers on a Match Group dating app. 

“In 10% of the incidents, dating platforms matched their users with someone who had been accused or convicted of sexual assault at least once, the analysis found. Only a fraction of these cases involved a registered sex offender,” according to the investigation. 

However, what was most notable was that Match.com, which does have a screening policy, had no assault cases. Match Group’s spokesperson said that tens of millions of people use their platform, therefore 157 cases aren’t enough to warrant an overhaul. 

 “[Match Group] takes the safety, security, and well-being of our users very seriously,” the company said in a statement. “A relatively small amount of the tens of millions of people using one of our dating services have fallen victim to criminal activity by predators. We believe any incident of misconduct or criminal behavior is one too many.”

Some employees told CJI they don’t think the company goes far enough to protect users.

According to the investigation, many who worked at Match Group feel the company doesn’t equip or train them to deal with sexual assault complaints. Some said the process also fails to prevent more harm even after an incident has been reported because banned users can easily make new accounts.

“The problem has grown as the popularity of online dating has soared — in 2015, 12% of American adults were on a dating site, compared with 3% in 2008,” according to the report. “In 2016, the UK National Crime Agency reviewed police reports over a five-year period and found online-dating sexual assault had increased as much as 450% — from 33 to 184 cases.” 

CJI surveyed 1,200 women who used a dating app with the last 15 years. A third of the women surveyed said one of their dates sexually assaulted them, half of these women said it was rape. Match Group refused to comment on the questionnaire. 

Only five states have regulations to protect online daters, but those measures largely exist to prevent scams. With little pressure for the industry to change and as more victims come forward the future of online dating remains uncertain.

Harvard’s Only Latina Professor Was Denied Tenure, Sparking Student Protests and a Larger Conversation About Institutional Racism

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Harvard’s Only Latina Professor Was Denied Tenure, Sparking Student Protests and a Larger Conversation About Institutional Racism

@DivestHarvard / Twiter

Harvard has long been regarded as one of the most prestigious academic institutions in the US, if not the world. The Ivy League University has 36,012 students and 2,400 faculty members from over 150 countries. But although Harvard often boasts of the efforts they make to diversify their students, their faculty, and their curriculum, their track record has been less than stellar. That has been no clearer than in the recent turmoil surrounding the denial of their only Latina Professor, Lorgia García Peña. 

Once students learned of the University President’s decision to deny Garcia tenure, they were dismayed. Garcia’s tenure had been watched closely by the student body throughout the year, some going so far as to conduct a letter-writing campaign on her behalf earlier in the year. Once the initial disappointment at the decision faded, some students felt the need to take action. 

On Monday, roughly 50 students took to Harvard’s University Hall to protest Professor García’s tenure denial.

Although there is a Non-Discrimination and Affirmative Action clause in Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences Appointment Handbook, students believe that the decision to deny García tenure “exemplifies bias in the review process against professors of Ethnic Studies, whose scholarship and mentorship often put them in tension with Harvard’s administration”. 

In light of the upsetting denial of Garcia as a tenured professor, students drafted a petition with a list of demands aimed at the administration. The petition demands that the administration provides students with an explanation as to why Garcia’s tenure was denied. Students also demand a formal investigation into the alleged reasoning behind the tenure denial, with a specific focus on possible unconscious or structrual bias. Last but not least, the students demand the formal establishment of an Ethnic Studies Division–a request that the student body has been pursuing since 1972. 

For college professors, securing tenure is widely thought of as the most important accomplishment in their academic career.

According to The American Association of University Professors, becoming a tenured professor means that you “can be terminated only for cause or under extraordinary circumstances”. In other words, it is a professor’s permanent job contract, which grants them greater academic freedom and protects them from being arbitrary fired. Usually, a professor is granted tenure after a probationary period of six years after which they’ve established themselves as valuable to the institution they’re working for. Usually during this time, they’re expected to publish academic research and findings to prove their value.

According to Professor Robert Anderson of Pepperdine University, tenure means that professors “are the most secure” in the unpredictable game of university politics. “[Tenured professors] are more like debt holders. If anyone bears the risk, it’s the staff who get tossed in the trash to save faculty”.

The uproar over Garcia’s tenure denial represents the larger struggle that many Latinx academics face when trying to establish themselves in higher education. 

As Latina Harvard student Mercedes Gomez tweeted on Monday, “Harvard flaunts its diversity and its admission numbers, but refuses to do the work to cultivate an environment for its students of color to feel safe and represented”. This statement rings true

As for the broader Latino community, they have not stayed silent on social media when commenting on Harvard’s questionable decision.

The fact itself that Professor Garcia is the only Latina on the faculty on the tenure track is room enough for skepticism. 

Harvard student Mercedes Gomez is especially invested in justice for Professor Garcia. 

https://twitter.com/gomezsb_/status/1201607299741212672?s=20

Let’s hope that the students’ activism spurs Harvard to re-think their decision.

This Latina academic has some chilling stories to tell about the way POC academics are structurally oppressed by academic institutions:

https://twitter.com/yarimarbonilla/status/1201689622583160832?s=20

The evidence seems to be piling up that these professors are denied tenure because their ideas don’t align with the institution’s bottom line. 

This Latina made a valid observation about how boringly predictable these tenure outcomes for WOC have become.

https://twitter.com/allisonefagan/status/1201864198403305472?s=20

The problem with institutional racism is that it’s so insidious–it’s often hard to see when it’s in front of you. And it’s even harder to call out.

This Latina is angry simply at the denial because of Garcia’s stellar resume. 

https://twitter.com/marisollebron/status/1201597626233315329?s=20

It’s frustrating to see that Ivy League institutions recruit off their claims of radical inclusivity, but their administrations don’t follow through when it comes to changing the structures of their institutions. 

The reason for Garcia’s tenure denial should be made public and then investigated. Because if this isn’t evidence of institutional racism, we don’t know what is.