Fierce

Lynda Carter Encourages Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez To ‘Never Stop Being Fierce’ Amid Yoho’s Harassment

Two of the greatest superheroes of our time, the original Wonder Woman  (Lynda Carter) and Reprenstantive Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez are all about girl power.

Carter shared her support for the freshman lawmaker after seeing a photo of Ocasio-Cortez and a picture of Wonder Woman in the background.

Carter, who played the iconic comic-book hero in the 70s, celebrated her 69th birthday last July. As part of her celebrations, she retweeted the image of the New York lawmaker writing “Okay, seeing this last night totally made my birthday that much sweeter. Love your decor, @AOC!”

Soon after, Ocasio-Cortez responded by tweeting the actress happy birthday. “Thank you for being a shining example of a woman’s strength! Happy birthday,” she replied.

AOC proved herself as a force to be reckoned with once again earlier last week when Rep. Ted Yoho called her a “bitch” outside of the Capitol.

Yoho denied the verbal attack but a reporter confirmed that he had also heard the comments.

Last Thursday, Ocasio-Cortez addressed the incident on the House floor calling “Yoho’s comments were not deeply hurtful or piercing to me” pointing out that her emotional reaction was “not new, and that is the problem.”

Ocasio-Cortez’s comments went viral after she addressed a previous “apology” made by Yoho in which he claimed that “having been married for 45 years with two daughters, I’m very cognizant of my language… The offensive name-calling words attributed to me by the press were never spoken to my colleagues. And if they were construed that way, I apologize for their misunderstanding.” He then went onto explain “I cannot apologize for my passion, or for loving my God, my family, or my country.”

In response, to his words, Ocasio-Cortez rejected his apology saying “Yesterday, Rep. Yoho decided to come to the floor of the House of Representatives and make excuses for his behavior. And that, I could not let go… I could not allow my nieces, I could not allow the little girls that I go home to, I could not allow victims of verbal abuse and worse to see that, to see that excuse, and to see our Congress accept it as legitimate and accept it as an apology.”

She concluded by adding “Having a daughter does not make a man decent. Having a wife does not make a decent man. Treating people with dignity and respect makes a decent man. And when a decent man messes up, as we all are bound to do, he tries his best and does apologize — not to save face, not to win a vote. He apologizes, genuinely, to repair and acknowledge the harm done so that we can all move on.”

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