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Latino Father And Daughter Both Born On February 29, Break Record On Day Of Her Birth

For one dad and daughter duo, it really is like father, like daughter.

Being a Leaper, someone born on February 29, is already a rarity as is. Because February 29 occurs on the calendar only every four years, odds of being born on a leap day are just 1 in 1,461. So what’s more rare and exciting than having a birthday that lands on a Leap Year? Having two family members born on one. Enter Ivan Peñaloza, 32, and his newborn daughter Camila Peñaloza.

The father and daughter share the rare coincidence of being born on February 29th.

Camila Peñaloza was born at Mercy San Juan Medical Center the day of what is technically her father’s eighth birthday. While the likelihood of being born on February 29th is just 1 in 1,461, the chances of having a double birthday is a chance of only one in two million double birthday.

In a statement through the Mercy San Juan Medical Center, Ivan Peñaloza said that he counted the coincidence as a blessing.

“I prayed to God for my little baby girl and now we are going to share this amazing bond for the rest of our lives and I am just so happy,” he said in a statement through the hospital.

To celebrate her special birthday, the staff at the hospital gave Camila a leapfrog outfit and sang happy birthday to her and her father.

“Having a child is such a special experience already but it has been that much more magical,” Jennifer Rebollar Cortez, mother to Camila, also said in a statement.

“We feel incredibly fortunate to share in this special, life-changing moment with this family. Our heartfelt congratulations and we wish them a lifetime of love and happiness with their new bundle of joy,” Michael Korpiel, the president of the Mercy San Juan Medical Center, said in a statement.

Black Mother, Amber Isaac, Tweeted Concerns About Hospital Care During Childbirth Before Her Death

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Black Mother, Amber Isaac, Tweeted Concerns About Hospital Care During Childbirth Before Her Death

GoFundMe

COVID-19 isn’t the only epidemic that should have you feeling alarmed. Across the globe, Black women continue to be mistreated, overlooked, and undervalued in the hallways of medical facilities and amongst medical professionals. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Black women are “three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women.”

Described by some medical professionals as a public health and human rights emergency the increasing number of birth-related deaths amongst Black women are preventable.

Just like the death of Amber Isaac.

Isaac was a 26-year-old black, Puerto Rican New York mother-to-be who passed away on April 21st.

While news of her death began trending last week on social media, most major news outlets have failed to report on the young mother’s death which occurred at the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx. According to ESSENCE, Isaac’s death stemmed “from complications in delivering her son Elias who was born after midnight.” Isaac’s partner Bruce McIntyre, 28. In an interview about his partner’s death, McIntyre said that Isaac died less than four days after she’d tweeted about wanting to write an exposé on dealing with incompetent doctors.


Isaac, who died alone due to current measures to prevent the spread of the Coronavirus in hospitals, was pronounced dead due to complications with her cesarean section.

“All of this was 100% preventable. All of it,” McIntyre told The Guardian in an interview. “I feel like she would have got more attentive care if she was a white mother, to be completely honest with you.” According to The Guardian, McIntyre described Isaac’s pregnancy as being “riddled with neglect by rude and unprofessional staff at the Montefiore Medical Center,” who ignored Isaac even when she looked to them for help with her concerns during her final weeks of pregnancy.

Dr. Joia Crear-Perry, founder and president of the National Birth Equity Collaborative described Isaac to The Guardian as being a healthy woman who had done all that she was supposed to during her pregnancy. “And she’s not the only one. That’s the story of the black maternal mortality issue across the United States,” Dr. Crear-Perry said about Isaac.

According to the Guardian “In New York City, black women are nearly eight times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women. Latinas in the metropolis – especially Puerto Ricans – also face higher risks of life-threatening complications during childbirth.”

“Unfortunately, what I see when I look at Amber Rose’s case is a beautiful young woman who fell through our big, gaping hole of a healthcare system,” Crear-Perry told the outlet.

Isaac’s death has sparked an outcry over the unnecessary deaths of Black mothers online.

Friends and family of the late mother have created a GoFundMe page to help support Isaac’s son and to give her a funeral service.

These Twins Had A Quarantine Birthday Party Designed To Ease Their Fears of COVID-19

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These Twins Had A Quarantine Birthday Party Designed To Ease Their Fears of COVID-19

Karo Zoto / Facebook

We’re all facing a world very different than the one we were so familiar with just a few months ago. Still, Karo Arana Soto wanted to make sure that the second birthday of her two twins Mateo and Matías was just as special as it was last year when they had it. While unable to throw a big bash for her twins Zoto was still able to put on a party that was pretty memorable and impressive.

It also had a theme was pretty apt for the current times.

For her sons’ big birthday, Zoto threw a COVID-19- themed party.

Image provided by Karo Arana Soto

To celebrate their big day, Zoto threw a smaller scale party complete with bouncers, music, games, gifts, piñata, sweets, cake, and pizza.”

Image provided by Karo Arana Soto

“Every birthday of José Ramon [the 4-year-old brother of Mateo and Matías] and the twins celebrate with a small party with family and close friends, this year for obvious reasons we could not all be together, so we decided to make their party with the COVID theme,” Zoto explained in an interview with mitú. “So when they get older see the photos and know why we were alone on his 2nd birthday, also this pandemic only talks about the bad things that happen and what can happen, so we try to ‘disguise fears’ and turn them into a piñata and a cake, my children had a lot of fun.”

Image provided by Karo Arana Soto

Speaking about the current situation and how her children are affecting it, Zoto says that she’s spending her days trying to make her kids feel safe.

Image provided by Karo Arana Soto

“It’s a situation that is forcing us as parents to be more creative and patient with children, in a normal situation, the twins go to a kindergarten, José Ramon to school and parents to work, we are altogether only in the afternoon and weekends, my husband continues to work normally. I’m an independent professional, so I was able to work the home office to be able to attend to my children, it is beautiful to be with them,” Zoto told us. “I never get bored but I never rest, we had a lot of fun but also we get stressed and we all get mad at everyone, there are toys all over the house, there is never silence and twins are in the process of leaving the diaper, imagine it … hahaha, it’s crazy! My 3 children are at a very demanding age of time and attention, so it has not been easy at all.”

So far, Zoto says that her kids are actually enjoying their time in quarantine.

Image provided by Karo Arana Soto

After all, their days are filled with a similar structure they had at school but with a lot more playtime.

Image provided by Karo Arana Soto

I think it is wonderful for them, even when they’re so young, to get up early, go to school, and kindergarten to follow a discipline and routine are part of some of their ‘authorities’ but in quarantine,” she explained. “They get up at home a little later, they play all day, school classes and homework are only for a while and the rest of the day we play, make camps, bathe in the pool, make movies, paint and whoever we can think of, sometimes we The ideas to entertain them end and the stress begins, I think that for them the real problem will be when the quarantine ends.”