Fierce

Latinas Talk: Breaking Up And Sticking It Out During Quarantine

Whether quarantine has brought you and your boo closer together, broken the relationship or brought out some ugly, we all know that Quarantining while in a relationship isn’t totally ideal. After all, when the option of getting space away from each other is off the table certain aspects of your relationship can seem more dire and troubling. We asked Latinas on our Instagram page what dating has like been during the Coronavirus and boy did they deliver!

How are you managing your relationship with your s/o right now?

Are you quarantining together or separately? How is the distance affecting your relationship?⁠

Check out the answers to our a questions below!

Dealing with long-distance

“I’m in a long-distance relationship but the uncertainty of when will we be able to make it to each other’s country is killing me.” — chaser.of.wonders

When the relationship just got started

“We’ve been dating since November and we are each in our own homes. So the skin hunger is real. I’m out of work but he is still working because construction is considered en essential service. It feels like we’ve missed relationship milestones on one hand, but have been together way longer because the situation has made time feel eternal. Some days are good and I feel like we are super connected and some days, if he’s too busy or my anxiety is high or we keep missing each others calls, it feels like we are drifting apart. Overall we are just doing the best we can and working on communication.” —angiebsantana

Facetime for lovers

“FaceTime has been a lifesaver and we send each other food through uber eats or online shop for them to be surprised the next morning and that kinda thing. We maintain date nights and watch a movie through FaceTime. It’s been hard we only live 30 min away but our love language is physical touch so I mailed him one of my shirts that smells like me and he sent me one of his hoodies to help me out during these times. ❤️ kept the love alive.” — okaykat96

You could be closer than ever

“Quarantined together and we’ve grown closer spiritually, emotionally and more in love than ever before.” —gelseyes

Heartbreak hurts but it also means growth

“He said he needed distance from me.. and we were quarantined apart 😐 so we broke up.” — natmrte

Do nie things for eachother and together

“We will have been a couple for 7 years this August (married for 1.5) and this is the most time we’ve ever spent together bc we have had opposite work schedules our entire relationship. It’s been awesome. I get to see him when I wake up and he sees me when he wakes up. We make meals together, have done bike rides around the block, watched all kinds of movies etc.”–_hi_rose_

Communication is KEY

“Stronger 💞 we have been communicating more than ever. We both have busy schedules even during quarantine but manage to check in throughout the day.”–wanderess.v

FIERCE LGBTQ Couples Are Sharing How They Met And It’s The Sweetest Thing

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FIERCE LGBTQ Couples Are Sharing How They Met And It’s The Sweetest Thing

Charles McQuillan / Getty

As we highlight Pride month, we wanted to share beautiful stories of LGBTQ+ love. To do so, we recently asked our FIERCE readers on Instagram to tell us how they met their partners and the results were not only hilarious but deeply inspiring.

Love is love and we love this kind of love.

Check it out!

The old slide in trick.

“I slid into the DMs.” – joanacanna

On their start to being ~educated latinas~

“My girlfriend and I met at the end of our first year of law school. She would say that I curved her for a few months before we became close. Almost three years later, we are both attorneys and looking forward to where life takes us.” – legalricanmujer

These two lovers who met while pushing for a joint interest

“We met in boot camp! 10 years ago (we’ve been together 2 /1/2 years, married 1 yr.” –hey_itsaj18

Chicas who started out on the same path and stuck together.

“We met in Nursing school we graduated together. That was 4 years ago, she’s a psychiatric nurse and I’m a geriatric nurse.” – m_a_r_i_a__j_o_h_a_n_n_a

They found love in a pandemic place.

Love in the time of Corona, thanks to Hinge!” – bienvenidarealidad__

Turns out the internet is the ultimate matchmaker.

“On the HER app. The same day she liked my profile she ended up coming into my job. I saw her but she didn’t see me. I ended up messaging her that night when I got off of work & we have been inseparable ever since. 3 years later and everyday I fall in love with her over & over again.” – _yourfavoritepoet_

And this is the most hilarious one of all.

“My wife @chulaworldand I were both seeing the same guy (total 🐶) …… so when we found out about each other we met up! And we have LITERALLY been inseparable ever since. Married on 4/20/19.” –bunuelitas

Working From Home Can Impact Your Mental Health, Here’s How To Stay Sane And Healthy

Things That Matter

Working From Home Can Impact Your Mental Health, Here’s How To Stay Sane And Healthy

Kathleen Demayo / Getty Stock

A recent survey shows that thirty-five percent of workers who telecommute said their mental health had deteriorated as a result of doing so amid the coronavirus lockdown. As someone who has gone from working in a social, fun-filled, compassionate office space, I can consider myself part of that 35%.

Although working from home (for those privileged enough to do so) is a necessity for our safety and that of the community – it definitely presents some unique challenges.

Yes, the benefits are many: avoiding transit problems and the stress of commuting; sidestepping office politics; adopting a flexible schedule that allows for chores and errands to be incorporated into the work day; more time with family and pets; and a break on keeping up a business wardrobe and other appearance-related expenses.

But there’s a dark side. It’s an arrangement that fosters isolation and disconnection, two conditions that feed the greedy depression monster.

Here are some excellent tips for taking care of your mental health during these unprecedented times.

Break up your workday

Credit: youmatter / Instagram

Some common challenges when working from home during the pandemic is the lack of stimulation and connection to people you used to see regularly. This can become a bit confusing, so it’s great to try to break up the schedule.

One of the best tips for working from home that I’ve discovered is breaking up the work day with movement. This can be a quick burst of movement (like jumping jacks, or lifting kettle bells) or some lower impact movement like a walk. I’m also a huge fan of taking a mid-afternoon break (longer than your typical 30-minute lunch break) to go on a long walk or run errands.

Get a routine and stick to it

Routine is essential, and it’s even more important when structure is missing.

Sticking to a routine does not mean that you have to abide by the old standard 9-5 office hours, and only take downtime in the evening. It simply means that you have a system for waking up on time, getting ready, feeling confident and getting your work done in a timely manner. 

When you do this regularly enough, it will feel more natural over time, and you won’t have to think about it so much. For me, this has meant taking my dogs out on a walk to get a coffee in the morning and then coming home and getting to work – it’s like creating my own little commute.

Stay connected

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Remember to keep up with friends and family, even if that can only be done through a Zoom or FaceTime call. Text someone you care about, and when restrictions are lifted in your area, try to make plans as regularly as you feel comfortable.

Connection is key, and it can be challenging when you don’t leave your home for long stretches of time.

It’s also helpful to join platforms of people doing similar work as you and interacting with them throughout the day. Or you can join an online book club or participate in volunteer work – having this sort of obligation will go a long way in helping you show up when you don’t feel great.

Incorporate wellness activities into your day

Credit: BeLatina / Instagram

One of the biggest perks of working from home is that you get to do things you might not be able to if you’re in an office all day.

I’ve been doing 20 minute walks around my neighborhood while listening to music. This moves the energy in the body and allow us to to have a shift in consciousness, which is so important when you’ve been isolated in front of a computer screen.

Another way to experience new energy in the body is to pause from work, find a comfortable place to sit, and then do deep belly breaths. This involves taking one deep breath in, and then focus on the exhale. You’ll notice your shoulders will relax, and your body will feel lighter.

Learn how to detach

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It’s so important when working from home that you keep your work and personal lives and actual physical areas totally separate. For many, it may not be possible to create an actual separate office space but you can create workspaces outside of your most “lived in” spaces. That’s what matters most.

There is a risk that working hours will get longer if the boundaries between work and personal life become blurred. It is necessary to establish a rigid system in which work can be carried out in a planned manner, such as by setting working hours and the timing of contact with supervisors.

No matter what you do, remember that working from home is yet another “new normal” to get used to — and the sooner you adapt to what makes you most productive, healthy, and mentally well, the better.