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“I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter” Debuts On Stage And Proves To Be A Huge Hit

The beloved bestselling novel I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter captivated just about every Latina in 2017. So when it was announced that the book, which follows 15-year-old Julia as she learns to cope with her older sister’s death, was getting the stage treatment, we were beyond thrilled.

Now, I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter is officially on stage and once again breaking hearts.

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Article in @teenvogue about I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter @steppenwolfthtr play!

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The theatrical adaptation, which is written by Chicago playwright Isaac Gómez, retells the story of Julia a girl stricken by the grief of her sister’s untimely death. Always under her parents’ watch, Juila questions her sister’s death as well as how to deal with her own issues with self-esteem. In the midst of her suffering, she decides to fight her way out of her family’s financially poor living conditions and into college outside of Chicago.

Speaking to Teen Vogue about the adaptation of her book, author Erika Sánchez spoke about her motivation for the book.

“I felt like I wanted to write the book I needed as a kid, [the one] young girls of color also need,” Sánchez said explaining that she wanted to write a book that “makes [young people] feel less alone, that someone understands them and what they’re going through.”

The 90-minute play made its debut in Chicago last week.

Actress Karen Rodriguez plays the part of Julia and told Teen Vogue she fell in love with the book because of its relevance. “I think the biggest thing that struck me the most was [Julia’s] journey of discovering that she is not okay mentally. She is going through a serious bout of depression,” Rodriguez explained to Teen Vogue. “I want young women that look like me and people who are outside of that experience to realize that Mexicans and brown people are not monoliths. It’s important to relate to experiences that might feel outside of your immediate experience, but actually you can totally relate to.”

 The show will run through April 5.

On March 13 there will be a special Spanish captioned performance. Tickets are $20.

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This Month, Isabel Allende Is Releasing a Memoir and HBO Is Releasing a Mini-Series Based on Her Life

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This Month, Isabel Allende Is Releasing a Memoir and HBO Is Releasing a Mini-Series Based on Her Life

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March is a busy month for Isabel Allende. The most successful Spanish-language author of all time released a new memoir, “The Soul of a Woman”, on March 2nd. On March 12th, HBO released a mini-series based on her life entitled “ISABEL: The Intimate Story of Isabel Allende”.

Both of these projects focus on the unifying themes of Isabel Allende’s life. How she has defied the patriarchy, bucked expectations, and pursued her dreams while the odds were against her.

The HBO mini-series, entitled “ISABEL: The Intimate Story of Isabel Allende”, covers a lot of ground. From Allende’s childhood in Chile, to the chaotic years of her uncle’s assassination (who happened to be Chile’s president), and her subsequent flight to Venezuela.

The series will also touch on different phases of her life. Her career as a journalist for a progressive feminist magazine. Dealing with her all-consuming grief when her daughter died in 1992. Publishing her first novel–“House of Spirits”–in 1982.

A scene from the trailer of “ISABEL” sums up the hurtles that Allende had to overcome to create a career for herself in the male-dominated world of publishing. “They are going to raise the bar because you’re a woman,” her agent tells her bluntly. “You’ll have to work twice as hard as a man in order to obtain half the prestige.”

Allende’s memoir, “The Soul of a Woman“, on the other hand, reflects on her life through a distinctly feminist lens.

Her publisher describes it as “a passionate and inspiring mediation on what it means to be a woman.” And it doesn’t appear that Allende is shying away from the label of “feminist”. One of the first sentences of her book states: “When I say that I was a feminist in kindergarten, even before the concept was known in my family, I am not exaggerating.”

Despite being 78-years-young, Allende’s beliefs–about feminism, freedom and intersectionality–are incredibly modern. Throughout her lengthy press tour, Allende has been candid about the life experiences that have shaped her beliefs–mainly how witnessing her mother’s suffering at the hands of her father contributed to her “rage against chauvinism.”

Today, Allende remains incredibly in touch with the progressive issues of the moment, like the #MeToo and Black Lives Matter movements.

“In patriarchy, we are all left out: women, poor people, Black people, people with disabilities, people with different sexual orientations,” she recently told PopSugar. “We are all left out! Because it divides us into small groups to control us.”

Above all, Allende believes that we all–especially women–should recognize that we have many of the same goals and dreams. And we’re stronger when we’re united. “Talk to each other — women alone are vulnerable, women together are invincible,” she says.

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Latinas Are Sharing Important Book Reading Clubs And Favorite Reads

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Latinas Are Sharing Important Book Reading Clubs And Favorite Reads

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There’s a reason why, in the age of television and Youtube, books continue to be read, loved, and adored by readers: when it comes to stories, books elevate the imagination in a way that can engage all of the senses. In times like these, where so many of us are in isolation and feeling alone, reading can, fortunately, do so much for the soul, and being apart of a book club (even if it is on Zoom) can help bring excitement to the monotony of our daily lives.

Fortunately, FIERCE Latinas are recommending book club suggestions as well as reads.

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The list below will surely fit the bill for all of your reading desires and help you get over any type of boredom you might have.

This club reading a Hollywood drama.

Amazon

“We actually have a book club called Pasando Páginas! We are currently reading the Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo.” – hijasunidas


@cafeconlibros_bk is reading Little 🔥Everywhere 12.27!” –boardroombombshell

“I started a book club last year and while it’s small, our reads are mighty.” –steezplz


“I just finished “Clap When You Land.” I was never impressed by Acevedo until this book. It blew me away. She focuses more on trauma and grief in adolescence and it’s pretty damn near perfect. HIGHLY recommend.”- abbeyliz7

This club only reading books by Latinas.

Amazon.com

“I started a book club with friends this year. We only read female authors from Latin America. So far, my favorites have been “Delirio” by Laura Restrepo and “Los recuerdos del porvenir” by Elena Garro.” –merimagdalen

“Always Running by Luis J Rodriguez was the first Chicano book I have ever read!!!!!” –valeriec01

This book club introducing readers to Chicano literature.

Amazon.com

“Always Running by Luis J Rodriguez was the first Chicano book I have ever read!!!!” valeriec01

“Visionaries a Private Reading Group for BIQTPOC hosted by @femmegoddessco.” –moniii_xoxo

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