Fierce

Greta Thunberg Is Donating $114,000 To The Brazilian Amazon

Greta Thunberg’s activism has mobilized hundreds of thousands of people across the globe to make the world a better place. She first gripped the attention of people the world over when she began holding climate strikes and further captured awareness a year later when she was 16. At the time she condemned political leaders like Donald Trump and Boris Johnson in a speech for their part in the environmental crisis.

Now, even as the world seems to be on pause with the current pandemic, Thunberg is showing no signs of slowing down with her efforts

The teen climate activist announced that she will donate a portion of a $1.14 million prize she received to fighting the ongoing coronavirus crisis in the Brazilian Amazon.

Earlier this week, the teen activist won the very first Gulbenkian Prize for Humanity for her role in environmental activism. The prize was launched by Portugal’s Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation.

In a video posted to her Twitter account, Thunberg accepted the honor and said the winning prize was “more money than [she] can even begin to imagine.” The large amount inspired Thunberg to give the money away through her foundation. Thunberg says that she will give $114,000 to SOS Amazônia, an environmental organization that CNN says is “working to protect the rainforest that also works to fight the pandemic in indigenous territories of the Amazon through access to basic hygiene, food, and health equipment.”

Thunberg will also donate $114,000 to the Stop Ecocide Foundation.

The foundation works to make environmental destruction (or ecocide) a recognized international crime. Thunberg explained in her Twitter announcement that the rest of the prize money will be given to causes that “help people on the front lines affected by the climate crisis and ecological crisis especially in the global South.”

One hundred and thirty-six nominees from forty-six countries were considered for the prize that Thunberg was ultimately selected for.

The Chair of the Grand Jury Prize, Jorge Sampaio, explained in the announcement for the winner that Thunberg was selected for her effort to “mobilize younger generations for the cause of climate change.”

It’s not the first prize that Thunberg has won in recent months. Earlier in May she was honored with a $100,000 award for her activism and donated all of it to UNICEF “to protect children from the Covid-19 pandemic.” The award was given to her by Denmark’s Human Act foundation.

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Trump Supporters Who Stormed The U.S. Capitol Are Learning That Their Actions Have Consequences

Things That Matter

Trump Supporters Who Stormed The U.S. Capitol Are Learning That Their Actions Have Consequences

Robert Nickelsberg / Getty

Yes, it’s true: 2020 set the bar low but 2021 has proven quickly that it will also have no chill.

Last week marked the first week back to WFH offices in the new year for quite a few people. And though so many of us expected that the break would bring a relaxed mood for even just a little bit, Republicans ruined the tone and extremists came out guns blazing. Literally. Last week, Trump supporters infiltrated the U.S. state Capitol in a coup and now many of them are paying the price.

For his part in the insurrection, Donald Trump no longer has access to social media, and those who stormed the capitol well… they’re facing arrests.

Capitol rioters are learning that their actions have consequences.

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According to reports, twenty federal criminal defendants related to the deadly pro-Trump riot at the US Capitol “have been rounded up across the country since the insurrection, with the allegations showing the danger of the mob.”

One of the federal defendants, Jacob Chansley, who stormed the Capitol building while wearing a bearskin headdress, face paint, and horns was arrested last week. According to court documents, he told the FBI he came to Washington “as a part of a group effort, with other ‘patriots’ from Arizona, at the request of the President that all ‘patriots’ come to D.C. on January 6, 2021.”

It’s important to note here while the Capitol riot resulted in the arrests of several people, “the charges filed so far have dealt with issues such as trespassing, disorderly contact, and weapon possession, not terrorism” according to Snopes. “While officials have opened domestic terrorism investigations, the FBI has not made any announcements designating everyone in attendance at the rally as a terrorist.”

This means that despite current trending Twitter hashtags, many of those who took part in the coup are not being kicked off of lights as they attempt to fly back home. As Snopes notes the people in these videos have not been added to no-fly lists.

On Sunday, Jan. 10 a video claimed to show a person discovering that they had been placed on the no-fly list for participating in a pro-Trump riot at the U.S. Capitol went viral. In the video, the man could be heard saying: “This is what they do to us. They kicked me off the plane. They called me a f*cking terrorist, and they f*ckin’ want to ruin my life!”

The video does show a person being kicked off of a flight, but it doesn’t seem that they were added to a “no-fly list” which is managed by the FBI’s Terrorist Screening Center and prohibits terrorists from boarding commercial aircraft. Instead, it seems the footage shows anti-maskers being escorted off of planes for refusing to wear their masks.

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A Brazilian Photographer Is Documenting Indigenous Tribes In The Amazon

Culture

A Brazilian Photographer Is Documenting Indigenous Tribes In The Amazon

ricardostuckert / Instagram

Indigenous tribes are the most important connection between man and nature. These tribes have lived off the land before modern society and many have never interacted with modern society. Ricardo Stuckert is going through and documenting the indigenous Amazonian tribes in Brazil.

Ricardo Stuckert is photographing indigenous tribespeople in the Brazilian Amazon.

The indigenous community is something sacred that most people agrees should be protected. They are more connected to the land than we are. Their customs and traditions are more ingrained in this world than ours are and it is so important to protect them.

The indigenous community of Brazil has been subjected to horrible attacks and conditions from the Brazilian government.

One of the most widespread attacks against the indigenous Brazilians living in the Amazon has been for the land. President Jair Bolsonaro has tried to take land away from the indigenous communities to allow for logging and mining. A bill he sent to the congress sought to exploit the land for commercial purposes, even legalizing some of the attacks we have seen on indigenous people since President Bolsonaro took power.

Stuckert wants to preserve the indigenous culture and customs through photos.

“I think it is important to disseminate Brazilian culture and show the way that native peoples live today,” Stuckert told DailyMail. “In 1997, I started to photograph the Amazon and had my first contact with the native people of Brazil. Since then, I have tried to show the diversity and plurality of indigenous culture, as well as emphasize the importance of the Indians as guardians of the forest. There are young people who are being born who have never seen or will see an Indian in their lives.”

The photographer believes that using photography is the best way to share culture.

“I think that photography has this power to transpose a culture like this to thousands of people,” Stuckert told DailyMail. “The importance of documentary photojournalism is to undo stigmas and propagate a culture that is being lost. We need to show the importance of indigenous people to the world, for the protection of our forests.”

You can see all of Stuckert’s photos on his Instagram.

Stuckert’s work to documented the indigenous community is giving people an insight into a life many never see. Brazil is home to about 210 million people with around 1 million having indigenous heritage. The diverse indigenous community of Brazil is something important to showcase and that’s what Stuckert is doing.

READ: Indigenous Photographer Diego Huerta’s Photos Of Oaxaca’s Indigenous People Celebrates Their Beauty

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