Fierce

Afro-Latina Journalist Gwen Ifill Will Be Honored As The Usps 43Rd Stamp In The Black Heritage Series

The 43rd stamp in the Black Heritage series honors the late Afro-Latina boss woman, Gwen Ifill (1955–2016), one of America’s most esteemed journalists. The US Postal service stamp features a photo taken of the PBS News Hour co-anchor who sadly died in 2016. 

The stamp was unveiled just last week.

The stamp, which was unveiled last Tuesday, features a 2008 photo of Ifill with the words “BLACK HERITAGE” at the top and Ifill’s name at the bottom. It’s the 43rd stamp in the Black Heritage series and one of several new designs that will be issued next year.

Ifill was a pioneer for women and African Americans in journalism.

She become the first African American woman to host a major political talk show when she took the helm at PBS’s “Washington Week in Review.” “Gwen Ifill was a remarkable trailblazer who broke through gender and racial barriers,” shared Deputy Postmaster General Ronald A. Stroman at a dedication ceremony held for her at the Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C.

The Deputy Postmaster went on to say, 

“The Postal Service is proud to celebrate Gwen’s contribution as a remarkable journalist with this beautiful commemorative Forever stamp. Gwen was truly a national treasure, and so richly deserving of today’s honor.” Gwen was a New York native of Panamanian and Barbadian descent who left behind an indelible journalistic legacy. Not only did she break down barriers on TV but she also worked for The New York Times and The Washington Post. Apart from her journalistic achievements, she also wrote the book The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama.

Ifill worked at the NewsHour for 17 years.

The anchor covered eight presidential campaigns and moderated two vice-presidential debates. She was also the moderator and managing editor of “Washington Week.”

Her brother shared a statement

“The Ifill family is thrilled that our sister, cousin, and aunt has received this signal tribute to her legacy as a truth-teller, pioneer and exemplar,” said Bert Ifill, Gwen’s brother and spokesperson for the family. “As a reporter and moderator, Gwen was dedicated to two principles: getting the story right and getting the right stories out. As a mentor, supportive friend, and family member, she was determined, not only to open doors for those of us previously locked out of opportunity but also to provide floor plans to help us find our way through. She is forever in our hearts, and we are forever in her debt.”

Latinas talk “Imposter Syndrome”

Entertainment

Latinas talk “Imposter Syndrome”

Oli Scarff / Getty

Imposter syndrome. It may happen when you finally got accepted to college and have found yourself overwhelmed by the student body, or when you accepted that dream job, or even while doing your job. It can happen in relationships, in friendships. Basically anywhere and amongst us Latinas too. Even despite our hard work and much-earned credentials.

We wanted to talk about Imposter’s Syndrome and how to deal with it, so we reached out to our FIERCE audience on Instagram for their thoughts.

Latinas got real with their responses about feeling as if they were undeserving.

Check them out below!

Remind yourself that you’ve worked hard and are deserving.

“Thank you for posting this! I actually just got hired on as a school counselor and I’m feeling this intensely right now. I have to keep reminding myself that I worked so hard for this and that I AM WORTH IT!” – adelitafamania

Understand that anything can trigger it.

“It happens to me every single day on so many levels. It’s been holding me back my whole life and I keep pushing against it, some days it gets the better of me but I won’t give up on myself even when I really feel I’m not capable. I get so stressed all the time thinking someone is going to discover that I’m not smart, or fun, or whatever it is at that moment that I shut down. It’s so good to openly discuss it with friends or even professional help.” – pinatapink

And it can lead to social anxiety.

“This is so hard, I feel like this nearly every day. Lately, it’s been getting in the way of my entire purpose and whether or not I want to work hard at all. I tend to think, “Like for what? I don’t deserve to have the things I want because I didn’t work hard enough.” Yet, I did. Probably more than anyone else in my programs, jobs, teams, even my friend group. This is so tough and often it leads to my social anxiety which affects a whole multitude of behavioral patterns like procrastination and chronic lateness.” –curlsofroses

But you can battle it by not shrugging off your achievements.

“Happens to me all the time. And when people give me praise I tend to say “oh it’s not a big deal.” But I’m trying to remember that I’m enough and hell yeah I’m a big deal.” – erika_kiks18

Because it can happen to brain surgeons and Fortune 500 CEOs too.

“Our country and our community has been through a lot since the middle of March. Now more than ever is the time to nourish our goals and inspirations. In my podcast, I bring together some of the highest achieving Latinos that our country has to offer: Dr. Quinoñes-Hinojosa: who went from migrant farm worker to a world-renowned brain surgeon
Hector Ruiz: one of the very few Latinos to be a Fortune 500 CEO of an American Company Louis Barajas: the #1 financial Latino expert in the USA. (He is most likely your favorite Reggaeton artist’s to-go financial guy.)
Cesar Garcia: an actor who has seen. dozens of times in music videos, shows, and movies. He’s known for his roles in Fast and Furious and Breaking Bad. Chef Aarón Sánchez: The most well-known Latin Chef in the country. Find an episode that catches your attention or share an episode to a friend of loved one that would like to hear from other Latinos on how they achieved their dreams and goals.” – trailblazinglatinospodcast

And you can cure it by not reminding yourself to not give weight to other people’s thoughts.

“I cured mine by not giving a fck! The enemy is a LIEEEE.” –stephaniesaraii

And last but not least, know that it can be hard to defeat but you ARE worthy.

“This was me on the first day after I transferred to University. The feeling still follows me sometimes. It hard to defeat.” – dianalajandre

Meghan Markle Spoke Spanish During A Volunteer Visit To An L.A. Charity That Taught Her How To Make Tamales Twenty Years AGo

Entertainment

Meghan Markle Spoke Spanish During A Volunteer Visit To An L.A. Charity That Taught Her How To Make Tamales Twenty Years AGo

WPA Pool / Getty

Meghan Markle is impressive no doubt about it.

On top of studying French for six years, the Duchess of Sussex completed an internship at the US Embassy in Buenos Aires while attending Northwestern University. There, according to the royal family’s website, she learned to speak Spanish.

It turns out, recently the Royal put her Spanish skills to the test during a visit to a charity organization in Los Angeles.

On June 23 Markle surprised people at Homeboy Industries when she put her Spanish skills to good use.

While working with the organization which supports people moving on after incarceration or gang involvement, Markle and her husband Prince Harry, baked goods alongside group members while learning about their backgrounds. According to People, “To the surprise of the room, Meghan, 38, also began speaking in Spanish with one of the participants.”

“She spoke Spanish perfectly with one young woman,” the group’s founder, Father Greg Boyle, told People in an interview. “She just went right into Spanish, which was a revelation — and it was very good.”

According to Boyle, Meghan and Harry “were completely engaged and very informal” during their volunteer visit. Boyle added that soon after George Floyd’s death, the Duchess of Sussex called him to arrange a visit to volunteer with Homeboy Industries.

“She didn’t want to have a long-table discussion or presentation or even a tour,” Boyle explained. “They knew we pivoted our organization to help address food insecurity in the county and that was intriguing to her, so she said, ‘We want to come and put an apron on,’ and that’s what they did. It was quite wonderful.”

While preparing croissants and baked goods, the couple wore masks and connected with the community.

According to a source that spoke to People it’s not her first time working with Boyle, who has worked at times with her alma mater (Immaculate Heart High School). Years ago, Meghan and her mother Doria Ragland, joined Boyle for a cooking workshop, and Marke “remembers the tamale recipe she learned there to this day.”

According to Boyle, “We were joking about that and she said, ‘I don’t even think Harry even had a tamale before!”