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A Latina Documented Her Panic Attack And Women Rallied To Support Her

It’s Mental Health Awareness Month and it’s clear we’ve never needed a spotlight on this day of observation more. As many of us continue to shelter in place and follow stay at home orders, face unemployment, and the stressors of extended isolation, it’s clear we’re all in need of a little support of our mental health.

To do her part in spotlighting this issue, actress Laura Alemán shared her own experiences with mental health.

In a post to her Instagram account, Alemán shared a video of herself going through a panic attack. In the video, Alemán appears inconsolable and upset. Soon after her post, we asked our users “Have you ever experienced a panic attack? What was it like for you? What are some tips that help you when going through one? If you don’t feel comfortable talking about it, we understand. Sometimes people don’t even know they are going through a panic attack.”

In response, Latinas spoke up and out about their own experiences with anxiety and depression and we’re so grateful

And so many of you gave helpful advice based on your own learning experiences.

“I like to do the 5-4-3-2-1 method as I feel it rising. In the past I would burst into them even during Yoga, now with journaling I can read over my thoughts and just let them out really. Sometimes make a chart of what is and isn’t in my control. Then looking at things as this is how it is and how can I work within this new reality.” –sunshinesmileluv

Some of the tips have even included regulating hormones and seeking professional help.

Two years ago I developed panic attacks that became more and more frequent with each day. I wasn’t able to sleep because I would get them when I was asleep. I went to the ER because I thought there was something wrong with my heart. I felt chest tightness and shortness of breath. I felt like I was always on the verge of passing out. All of the medical exams revealed there was nothing wrong with me. That was when I had to accept it was psychological. Funny thing is I studied and researched anxiety during grad school. I understood the neurobiology of stress, and anxiety from an academic standpoint. But it is something completely different experiencing it first hand, and there is no way to understand it just by reading it in journal articles and textbooks. I kept thinking of the HPA-axis, how the amygdala must be overactive and initiating a cascade of signaling molecules from my hypothalamus, pituitary gland, to my adrenal glands in order to release powerful hormones e.g. epinephrine and norepinephrine. Cortisol is released which facilitates a surge of glucose to course through my blood stream in order to prepare my body for “fight or flight”. Once this happens, there’s no stopping it with breathing exercises, you just have to ride it out and know it will pass. At first all I wanted to do was calm myself down and out of it, control it with my mind. But I couldn’t stay still, I had to move. So instead I started to run, I ran as fast as I could to release the energy my body was giving me once the panic attack would hit. This helped me immensely! And the episodes became less and less frequent in a week. But that wasn’t all I had to do. 
I started searching within myself for triggers. I started reading books, The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle was a godsend. I stayed away from coffee and anything that was overstimulating. I hope this helps. I have way more to share so if anyone needs to talk about it, DM me.” – ninastrada

Some tips also include grounding yourself in reality.

Panic attacks vary due to the person but for the most part, look like this. A tip I can offer is grounding: see 5 items, touch 4 things, hear 3 different sounds, smell 2 things and taste 1 item. This can help you distract yourself from what you were thinking about and focus on the task in hand. Hugging herself can also help. If you don’t have a pet, you can use a stuff bear/animal.”- cyn_la_malcriada

And others shared that mental illnesses can lead to other physical problems.

“I used to get what my family and I diagnosed as “minor asthma attacks” that we dealt with at home. I had been told by a doctor that stress could trigger my asthma but he didnt understand why someone as young as 12 (at that time) could get “stressed” and chalked it up to sugary and fatty foods because I was a chubby kid. Years later I was made to realise I had serious anxiety, my panic attacks were then causing the asthma attacks. Awareness is necessary, misdiagnosing and downplaying these things causes further problems. Appreciate her bravery.”-ecolina5210

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Kamala Harris Ruffles Republican Feathers With Her Dancing And Proves GOP Wouldn’t Know Fun If It Threw Them A Party

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Kamala Harris Ruffles Republican Feathers With Her Dancing And Proves GOP Wouldn’t Know Fun If It Threw Them A Party

Nic Antaya / Getty

Right-wing conservatives really don’t know how to have a good time.

You may remember about a year ago the GOP was up in arms when 30 seconds of a 4-minute, 20-second video that featured a then-freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez dancing in a video filmed at her alma mater Boston University. The video saw Ocasio-Cortez, who graduated from BU in 2011 with a degree in economics and international relations, imitating dance scenes from popular 1980s films and upset conservatives because she was… dun. DUN. DUNNN.

Dancing.

Now it seems the GOP are startled again, this time after seeing Sen. Kamala Harris breakout some moves of her own.

In a recent post published by The Washington Street Journal, author Peggy Noonan revealed that she took umbrage with Harris’s dance moves.

Noonan, a former speechwriter for Ronald Reagan and past winner of a Pulitzer Prize for commentary, spent her time scrutinizing Harris’ recent appearance at a recent campaign rally in Jacksonville, FL. For her appearance, Harris wore Converse sneakers and danced in the rain.

Noonan remarked that the senator’s “giddy” appearance was unserious. “She’s dancing with drum lines and beginning rallies with ‘Wassup, Florida!” Noonan remarked. “She’s throwing her head back and laughing a loud laugh, especially when nobody said anything funny. She’s the younger candidate going for the younger vote, and she’s going for a Happy Warrior vibe, but she’s coming across as insubstantial, frivolous.” Noonan also called Harris’s moves “embarrassing.” 

“Kamala Harris is running for vice president of the United States in an era of heightened and unending crisis,” she went onto write. “The world, which doubts our strength, our character, and our class, is watching. If you can’t imitate gravity, could you at least try for seriousness?”

Of course, in this piece, Noonan had nothing to say about Trump’s attempts at dancing which are in fact deeply embarrassing.

Many have been quick to highlight Noonan’s criticism and the double standard which she applied to Harris’ behavior in her piece.

“Peggy Noonan attacks Senator Harris b/c white supremacy dictates black women should stay in their place: quiet, subservient, and obedient,” one Twitter commented. “This is 2020. You don’t dictate Kamala Harris’s existence. You can’t take Kamala Harris’s joy.”

“This is the joy that so triggered Peggy Noonan that she wrote a column about how Senator Harris comes off as ‘insubstantial, frivolous,’” African American Policy Forum commented. “Black joy is something they feel the need to attack.”

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Women Are Speaking Out About What Changed Their Minds About Abortion

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Women Are Speaking Out About What Changed Their Minds About Abortion

Mark Reinstein / Getty

With so much at stake this election year, it’s important to understand the circumstances behind some of our biggest beliefs. Currently there are little questions as to whether Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is in opposition to a person’s right to abortion. Her Catholic faith, her academic writing, and accounts from friends affirm that she has opposes the medical procedure. During a 2017 confirmation hearing for her current position as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in Chicago, Coney Barret stated that she was bound to follow the Roe decision as an appeals court judge stating “Roe has been affirmed many times and survived many challenges in the court… And it’s more than 40 years old, and it’s clearly binding on all courts of appeals. And so it’s not open to me or up to me, and I would have no interest in, as a court of appeals judge, challenging that precedent.”

There’s likely no chance of changing her mind, but we were curious about how women felt.

A recent post on Reddit posed the question: What changed your mind on abortion?

Check out the answers below!

“Being pregnant (with a very much wanted baby). I’ve always been pro choice, but learning about how much can go wrong in a pregnancy made it very apparent abortion is far from a black and white issue. For example, say the fetus has some defect where it can be carried to term, but will 100% die shortly after birth. There is no reason the mother should be forced to carry out the whole pregnancy. There are so many other nuances like this that are not possible to legislate.” – kittyinparis

“having one myself. i was religious, orthodox christian once upon a time. i hate to be one of those people who didn’t understand something until i experienced it myself but it is what it was. i extremely naive and ignorant because i thought that it was as simple as “don’t get pregnant if you don’t want a kid”. but it’s really not. and you never know what someone’s story is. and even then, regardless of their situation i think if someone doesn’t want to be pregnant it’s immoral to force them to be.” – Reddit user

“Honestly? Biology class. They went over sexual reproduction step by step and I just couldn’t buy the whole “humanity begins at conception” thing anymore. Then I started reading what all those scary buzzwords meant and I got a bit pissed off. Turns out the evil “partial-birth abortions” are usually called D&Es and they’re usually only done to babies with no chance of survival or in the cases of miscarriages. That’s not evil. That’s sad. I felt lied to, in a big way.” – Moritani

“I learned more about the concepts of bodily autonomy and consent and decided that it’s wrong to force people to remain pregnant against their will.” – enerjem

“When I first learned about the concept it seemed like a terrible thing but even after just 20 minutes of research (I did a lot more clearly, but this is just to emphasize how simple this decision was) I became pro-choice at 14ish, and I’ve had that stance ever since. So I only barely changed my mind really, but I think it counts because without looking into it I could’ve gone on believing it to be morally repugnant just because of what it sounds like and because it’s a subject that’s so easy to get carried away on and not look at objectively.” – ypical_Humanoid

“Paying my own bills. It’s a lot harder to feed two mouths than one.” – Reddit user

“Having kids. Pre-kids i was very prolife. Went to rallys and everything. Would have stressed and felt guilty if i got pregnant and dont knownwhat i would have chosen though. 4 kids later and several oops…im very pro choice.” – Strikingachord

“I was pro-life until I was about 13. I figure my brain developed more and I was then better able to see the issue in a more global and expansive way and determined that pro-choice was the most ethical stance.” – searedscallops

“Meeting someone in college who had had one in the past, and who spoke openly about it. She didn’t regret it or torture herself with guilt and shame over it, but she wasn’t a depraved monster, either. She was a wonderful person who did what was best for herself and her situation.” –coffeeblossom

“Having to get one myself.” –aj4ever

“I don’t know that I was ever pro-life in the same way I don’t think I was ever really Christian. I grew up in an Evangelical Protestant denomination, and until about middle school I mostly parroted things I heard. Things like “hate the sin love the sinner” for anything from being gay to probably having an abortion.

Sometime around middle school I started questioning all of it, forming my own opinions on things. I landed on atheist pro-choice feminist and have stayed there since.” – DejaBlonde

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