Things That Matter

In A Seriously Awkward Announcement, Vice President Pence Went To Florida To Launch A ‘Latinos For Trump’ Coalition

From the administration’s treatment of children at detention facilities, its separation of families, the rollback of asylum protections for refugees, and so much more, the Trump administration can hardly claim to be an ally of the Latino community.

Yet that’s exactly what they’re doing.

Vice President Pence launched a coalition called “Latinos For Trump” while at a rally in Florida.

Credit: @latinovictoryus / Twitter

Vice President Mike Pence told a Latino crowd Tuesday that President Trump has been “a great champion of Latino and Hispanic Americans,” touting the president’s economic policies while warning Democrats want to bring socialism to America. “Tomorrow night, many of the Democratic Party’s leading candidates are actually going to openly advocate for an economic system that has impoverished millions,” he said at an event aimed at Hispanic voters in Miami.

“Now, Latino Americans know better than most about the cost of socialism. It’s impoverished generations and stolen the liberty of millions,” he added, a reference to a number of South American countries that have been roiled by socialist governments, most recently Venezuela.

Pence declared: “We must say, as the president said in his State of the Union address, America will never be a socialist country.”

The event came days after the administration delayed plans for massive ICE raids on the Latino community.

Credit: @CheriJacobus / Twitter

Pence’s remarks came as part of an event launching the “Latinos for Trump” coalition, an effort to woo Latino voters in advance of next November’s election.

He told the crowd they would be “one of the most important coalitions of the 2020 campaign.”

The event comes a day ahead of the first Democratic presidential primary debates in Miami, and a week after President Trump held his official campaign kickoff rally in Orlando, signaling Florida’s significance to his re-election hopes.

Reactions across Twitter to the new coalition were pretty clear.

Credit: @latinovictoryus / Twitter

For real though. The Trump Administration has rolled back protection after protection for migrants coming to this country while simultaneously making conditions back in their home countries a living hell.

Not to mention the reactions to Pence saying “Hola” to the crowd.

https://twitter.com/Henry815gale/status/1143610064588161025

Like seriously, the nerve of this guy to come up on stage and pander to a group of people that the administration has been so cruel to.

Many on Latino Twitter had a big “no gracias” for the Vice President.

Credit: @StephenAtHome / Twitter

Few Latinos on Twitter had any interest in joining this so-called coalition.

While others pointed out the irony in the administration’s plan to gain Latino support.

Credit: @latinovictoryus / Twitter

Just think of all the hashtags that have been created just to document the cruelty of this administration’s immigration policies. That’s symbolic enough.

Even actor George Takei took to Twitter to point out the obvious awkwardness of the whole thing.

Credit: @GeorgeTakei / Twitter

It’s awkward but perhaps the administration is realizing that they’re support in Florida is dwindling fast and now they’re beginning to pander to the very communities they’ve been so cruel to.

But I think this Twitter user just about sums it up perfectly.

Translation: Don’t even with your “hola.”

Telemundo Poll Reveals 25% Of Latinos Plan To Vote For Trump In 2020 And Twitter Has Opinions

Things That Matter

Telemundo Poll Reveals 25% Of Latinos Plan To Vote For Trump In 2020 And Twitter Has Opinions

AlDiaNews

Yes, como lo leen. But this should not surprise us in the least. One of the biggest misconceptions that the general population in the United States has is that the Latino population is a unique group with the same political inclinations. However, that is far, far from the truth. The Latino population is very diverse. The United States has enjoyed migration from about every single Latin American country. 

These migrants have moved to the United States for all sorts of reasons. Some have escaped guerrilla warfare, others fled communist regimes in Cuba and other countries and therefore align with more conservative candidates who hold a tough stance in international affairs. Other groups have been in the States from way back, when Arizona, New Mexico and other states were actually part of Mexico. Some of these Latino citizens are against immigration, wrongfully accusing new migrants of giving Latinos a bad name. Other Latinos are of course highly involves in activism and human rights issues.

The Latino vote is the Holy Grail of American politics today. Why? Simple: numbers. As USA Today reports: “About 32 million Latinos will be eligible to vote in 2020, compared with 30 million eligible black voters, according to the analysis”. 

25% of Latinos will likely vote for Trump. The Telemundo poll is raising eyebrows, but how surprising is it really?

Credit: LatinosForTrump20 / Instagram

The poll was conducted among 1,000 voters and has about 3.4% margin of error either way. The fact that a quarter of respondents would vote for Trump despite his borderline racist stance on immigration might seem like an unexpected revelation, but it shouldn’t be so. We gotta remember that in Florida, for example, some of the most influential groups are Cuban and Venezuelan exiles who despise the left-leaning governments in their countries. 

64% of Latinos wanna drive Trump out of the White House.

Credit: Equality Vote / Instagram

The poll also revealed that more than half of Latinos want Trump gone, while 11% remain indecisive. This might seem like a big win for Democrats, but the fact that some Latinos will still vote for Trump despite the ICE reign of terror during his administration could also be read as a big win for the former reality TV star.

Women, young people and those living on the West Coast push anti-Trump numbers up.

Credit: Equality Vote Now / Instagram

According to the poll, rejection to Trump among women sits at a 66% (he has never been much of a ladies’ man, particularly after the “grab them by the pussy” episode). 69% of under 50s want to say adiós to POTUS. Tellingly, among those living in the Pacific Coast 70% want him out, perhaps a response to his anti-immigration policies and his jurisdictional war against the state government of California. 

57% of Latinos support impeachment and 34% oppose it. This reflects the Latino congressional vote in 2018.

Of course the question in everyone’s mind is if Trump will even run in 2020 or if he will be impeached and removed from office. Of course impeachment is a lengthy and divisive process and we might not find out the political fate of the most powerful country on Earth until way into the election campaign.

But the majority of Latinos want the impeachment process to go ahead, perhaps due to the fact that they come from countries where impunity runs rampant and there are generally no repercussions for alleged instances of corruption. If the 2018 midterm elections were any indication of how Latinos are leaning in the 2020 election, this result reaffirms it. 

Among the potential Democratic candidates, Joe Biden takes the lead among Latinos.

Credit: JoeBiden.com

The other big question surrounding the election is who on Earth will run opposite Trump in 2020. The Democratic field is still wide open. However, as with national polls that take into account the whole of the population, former Vice President Joe Biden (a key figure in the whole impeachment drama) has the lead among Latinos with 26%, ahead of Bernie Sanders (18%) and Elizabeth Warren (10%). Some sectors of the Latino population are still resistant to the idea of a woman ruling over the Oval Office.

Julián Castro’s numbers among Latinos will surprise you.

Credit: Paul Deblois / Getty

Un mísero 2%! Yes, single digits for the one Latino candidate in the race. His campaign never really caught fire and it was perhaps a bit premature. However, we should not rule out a future run given his proven political resilience and his message of hope and inclusive policies. It just wasn’t his time yet.

Will we see more of him? This truly astonishing number comes even as Castro has made Latino engagement a cornerstone of his campaign. As USA Today reports: “Castro has made Latino and immigrant issues a cornerstone of his campaign. His first trip as a presidential candidate this year was to a Latino summit in Puerto Rico, and he has highlighted changes he would make to Trump’s immigration policies”. 

This Study On Latino Republicans And Their Beliefs Will Make You Better Understand Your MAGA Family

Things That Matter

This Study On Latino Republicans And Their Beliefs Will Make You Better Understand Your MAGA Family

Like most other American families, Latino-American families can be home to a wide range of differing political opinions, leaving family members on each side of the aisle appalled with each other’s opposite opinions. You might be a liberal trying to understand how your brown, immigrant mami is walking around in a MAGA hat, or you might be just as pleased as we are that the Latino vote is finally being more closely examined. Either way, The Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Houston has given a home to Professor Rottinghaus and co-author Rudy Fonseca, who just published a study complete with answers to all your questions.

Myth #1: “Latinos are Natural Democrats…but it Ain’t Happening in Texas”

Credit: @stormirdgz / Twitter

Tejanos are more likely to be registered Republicans than Latinos in other states. Twenty-seven percent of Tejanos identified as Republican, compared to 21 percent of Latinos in all other states during a 2014 Gallup poll. That said, the study reports that “divisive rhetoric and harsh immigration policies has
led many to hit the alarm.” As of September 2019, Trump has a 24 percent approval rating among Latinos, compared with an average of 30 percent to 35 percent of the Latino vote typically given to Republicans.

Bottom line: The majority of Latino-Americans identify with the Democratic party, but about a third of us identify as Republican.

Myth #2: “Latinx Republicans Must Be Less Conservative than Other Republicans”

Study: “Six Myths About Texas Latinx Republicans.” Brandon Rottinghaus, Rudy Fonseca. 3 October 2019.

This myth is also pretty close to the truth, but it’s not the whole story. While Latino Republicans are more likely to identify as “somewhat conservative” than Republicans as a whole, it doesn’t mean they fall right in the middle of the political spectrum. An October 2016 Texas Tribune poll illustrated that Latino Republicans are far less likely to identify as “extremely conservative” than their Republican counterparts as a whole. 

Bottom line: Latino Republicans are slightly less conservative than Republicans as a whole, but are still squarely Republican. Rottinghaus’s study notes that the party is likely to lose Latino voters if they continue to lean more extremely to the right. 

Myth #3: “Latinx Republicans Are Moderating Recently As Republican Party
Rhetoric Grows more Conservative”

Study: “Six Myths About Texas Latinx Republicans.” Brandon Rottinghaus, Rudy Fonseca. 3 October 2019.

Myth #2 brings us straight to myth #3. Latino Republicans are growing more conservative over time. Another Texas Tribune poll just two years later showed that 27 percent of Latino Republicans are now identifying as “extremely conservative,” as compared to 19 percent just two years prior.

The same poll broke down some differences of opinion. When it comes to deportation, border security, trade negotiations, and judicial nominees, Latino Republicans were less in favor of Trump’s tactics than other Republicans. They were also 18 percent less likely to feel that “Trump cares about people like you” than the Republican party as a whole.

Bottom line: The myth is true. Latino Republicans are more moderate compared to the Republican party at large. 

Myth #4: Latinos are Culturally Conservative, And This is the Only Reason They
Support the Republican Party

Credit: @LaRepublicana86 / Twitter

The study concludes what we all already knew. If you had to genuflect in front of a Jesus painting at the entrance of your house, that (i.e. religion) plays a “major role” in choosing the Republican party. Those religious values that determine pro-life and anti-gay marriage political beliefs strongly swing a Latino’s choice of party. 

Bottom line: Of course, cultural beliefs are not the “only reason” Latinos might become Republicans. Homeowners and Latinos who have established roots in the U.S. for several generations are more likely to support the Republican party. Men are also more likely than Latinas to identify as Republican. The higher the income, the higher the probability a Latino might identify as a Republican.

Myth #5: “Latinx Republicans are “Softer” On Illegal Voting and Immigration
Than Other Republicans”

Study: “Six Myths About Texas Latinx Republicans.” Brandon Rottinghaus, Rudy Fonseca. 3 October 2019.

The study concludes that while Latino Republicans, in fact, are “softer” on these issues than other Republicans, the one area that sets them apart is deportation. A Texas Tribune 2016 poll showed 19 percent of Latino Republicans “strongly agreed” that “undocumented immigrants should be deported immediately,” compared to 35 percent of all Republicans. 

Bottom line: When it comes to immigration, Latino Republicans don’t see it as such a serious threat as other Republicans, but that gap is beginning to close. The 2018 Texas Tribune poll showed a nearly 15 percent rise in general opinion that “undocumented immigrants should be deported immediately,” and the gap between Latino Republicans and the party as a whole has closed by 2 points.

Myth #6: Latinos Don’t Feel Welcome in the Republican Party

Credit: @stormirdgz / Twitter

The Houston study completely debunked this myth, finding that 61 percent of Latinx Republicans do feel welcome in the Republican party, compared to 68% of all Republicans. They might not feel as welcome as other Republicans, but the majority do feel welcome.

Bottom line: While Latino-Republicans feel welcome in their own party as a whole, only 22 percent of them feel the Republican party is “doing a good job” in reaching out to Latinos, according to the study. “The “sleeping giant” is real: Latinos are predicted to become
the largest population group in Texas by 2022,” the study concludes. If immigration is where Latino Republicans have differing views, the continued focus on deportation in the 2020 campaign could cause Latino Republicans to feel even less welcome in their own party.