Things That Matter

Some People Were Stanning For This 60-Year-Old Man Who Quit His Job To Become A Makeup Artist

One man is fighting stereotypes and going against the odds to follow his passion.

A former truck driver, Raúl Santiago Garcia, 60, started selling cosmetics as a hobby and now he’s followed his dream and graduated from makeup artistry school in Mexico.

The news of a 60-year-old man going against stereotypes to follow his hobby made headlines across the Internet.

Credit: @SinEmbargoMX / Twitter

Translation: Raúl, 60-years-old, decides to devote himself to makeup.

Raúl is from Caborca, Sonora, divorced, and a father of three daughters who now lives in Arizona. He drives semi-trucks for a living and only started selling cosmetics as a side hustle.

He’s got coarse hands, a thick black mustache, wears polos and a hat – not exactly someone you’d expect to be doing makeup. But that’s exactly why he’s pursuing his dream.

In an interview with Proyecto Puente, Don Raúl says: “I do not have prejudices. I respect people for who they are and for their work. If you know how to do it well, keep doing it.” This belief has helped power him through the course even when he may have been super nervous.

Raúl discovered Deysbel Olachea, a professional makeup artist from his hometown, on Facebook.

But tired of simply watching her videos on Facebook, Raúl traveled back to Sonora to meet with her and take one of her intensive courses. He spent three days among brushes, shadow palettes and the company of an entirely female group of students, who quickly welcomed him into the learning process.

For Deysbel Olachea, his instructor, she said meeting him was a huge surprise.

She thought he was going to be younger. She told Proyecto Puente, “It was very funny because the course started on Friday…he arrived early and I was busy doing makeup. He sat in the room looking very intimidated.

In his first class, Raúl says he didn’t even want to touch the model, afraid he would scratch her.

But by the time the class was finished he was full of confidence, according to his classmates. By the time the course was over, Raúl felt like he was in the top of the class and was super proud of his ‘blending’ techniques.

“I was surprised on Sunday, in the classroom, to see my diploma, the photos and all that … my voice broke to speak,” he told Proyecto Puente.

Since his story has gone viral, Raúl has received all sorts of positive messages and support.

However, there is one in particular that stands out to him. He told Proyecto Puente, “I got a message from a gentleman who says he spends a lot of time thinking about makeup, but as a man…’, he tells me. So I returned the message and told him to just do it, to go to work, and do it for him not for what society thinks.”

Many were so glad that a man was fighting against stereotypes.

Credit: @VivelaVidapy / Twitter

He’s helping pave the way for other men to enter the makeup industry!

One Twitter user celebrated Raúl’s decision by reminding everyone that it’s never too late to follow your passion.

Credit: @SinEmbargoMX / Twitter

If you have a dream or a passion, it really is never too late.

Some on Twitter were thanking him because his story has them thinking about going back to study!

Credit: @SinEmbargoMX / Twitter

Translation: You make me want to go back to study, congratulations!

Others simply wanted to congratulate the man on a job well done!

Credit: @SinEmbargoMX / Twitter

And we are totally stanning right there with the rest of Twitter.

But what is most important about his story is that he didn’t care what others would say about him. And this is the incredible impression that many are left with.

Credit: @SinEmbargoMX / Twitter

The recent graduate is even fielding calls from a Ford assembly plant in Hermosillo and offices in Colombia – all inviting him to give talks on inspirational leadership.

Bravo, Raúl!

READ: These Rainbow-Inspired Makeup Looks Are What You Need In Your Life For Pride Month

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Mexico Wins International Award For $100 Peso Note Featuring 17th-Century Nun Sor Juana

Culture

Mexico Wins International Award For $100 Peso Note Featuring 17th-Century Nun Sor Juana

Over the last few years, Mexico has been updated its currency to make it more secure from counterfeiters and to highlight the country’s diverse history. One of the country’s newest bills is a $100 peso note featuring a 17th-Century female historical figure and it’s winning major international awards for its design and history.

Mexico’s $100-peso bill has been named banknote of the year for 2020 by the International Bank Note Society (IBNS). As printer and issuer of the note, the Bank of México beat 24 other nominees to the award, and the Sor Juana bill led the way from the start of the voting process.

The note features national heroine Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, with the monarch butterfly biosphere reserve on its reverse.

In its announcement the IBNS wrote: “Mexico’s award-winning entry may provide a template as other countries reconsider how they design and promote new banknotes.  The successful design in eye-pleasing red combines Hispanic architecture, a famous female Hispanic literary figure and a tribute to the world’s fragile ecosystem.”

Past bank note of the year recipients include Aruba, Canada, Uganda, the Faroe Islands, two time winner Switzerland and three time winner Kazakhstan, among others.

So who was Sor Juana and why was she important to Mexico?

Born in 1651, Sor Juana was a self-educated nun and intellectual renowned for her poetry, writing and political activism, who criticized the misogyny of colonial Mexico.

Beginning her studies at a young age, Sor Juana was fluent in Latin and also wrote in Nahuatl, and became known for her philosophy in her teens. Sor Juana educated herself in her own library, which was mostly inherited from her grandfather. After joining a nunnery in 1667, Sor Juana began writing poetry and prose dealing with such topics as love, feminism, and religion.

Mexico was up against 24 other countries in the nomination process.

In second place was Kate Cranston who appears on the Bank of Scotland’s 20 pound note. The businesswoman appears on the obverse and she is recognized for being the owner of the famous tea rooms inaugurated in 1903 and that today are a tourist attraction.

In third place there was a triple tie between the 20 pound note of the Ulster Bank of Northern Ireland whose design features flora and buskers. The one from the Bahamas of 5 dollars with the image of the junkanoo dancer, and the one of 50 dollars from Fiji.

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Protesters In Mexico Take To Streets To Demand Justice For Dog Brutally Killed By Man With An Axe

Things That Matter

Protesters In Mexico Take To Streets To Demand Justice For Dog Brutally Killed By Man With An Axe

Residents of one Mexican city have taken to the streets to demand justice for a local stray dog who was brutally killed in an axe attack last month. Video of the incident was uploaded to social media and quickly went viral, leading to large protests in the Sinaloan city of Los Mochis.

Hundreds marched in Los Mochis to seek justice for a dog killed by man with an axe.

Hundreds took to the streets in Los Mochis, Sinaloa to demand justice for Rodolfo, a mixed breed dog killed with an axe on March 21. They showed banners that read “Justice for Rodolfo & for all who have no voice,” “We won’t stop until we have justice,” and “Justice for Rodolfo,” among others.

Despite the COVID-19 regulations, the participants in this new march, children, women and men, calmly marched through the center of the city of Los Mochis to make it clear that they are against animal cruelty and demanded justice for Rodolfo, who was a local stray dog. The demonstration gained traction after a video of the attack on Rodolfo, also known by Heart, Pirate and Shorty, was uploaded onto social media.

The predominantly young crowd marched to the state prosecutor’s office where environmental activist Arturo Islas Allende delivered a criminal complaint. Many brought their pets to the march and carried placards demanding the killer be sentenced to prison. One placard read: “Justice for Rodolfo and for all those that don’t have a voice.”

The suspected attacker, José “M,” a student at a Sinaloa university, has already delivered a preparatory statement to officials. Islas Allende questioned the morality of the killer. “We don’t want a psychopath like him as our neighbor,” he said.

The suspect’s girlfriend claimed that he killed the dog to protect her.

The girlfriend of the alleged attacker took to social media in his defense, saying the dog had attacked her days earlier and injured her face and hands.

On her Facebook account she claimed that medical treatments for her injuries had cost 8,000 pesos (US $400) and uploaded photographs of the injuries caused by the dog’s bites.

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