Things That Matter

Transgender Honduran Woman Died In ICE Custody, Weeks After Seeking Asylum

Last night, people gathered at the Metropolitan Courthouse in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to protest the death of Roxana Hernandez, a transgender undocumented women. Protesters blame immigration officials for the unexpected death of the 33-year-old Honduran woman who attempted to gain asylum just weeks ago.

Hernandez was part of the migrant caravan that traveled by foot from Central America to the U.S. border in April. Many of the women and children, were seeking asylum to escape the violence in their countries. According to BuzzFeed, Hernandez was attempting to flee Honduras because she faced transgender discrimination.   

Hernandez died on May 25 at the Lovelace Medical Center (LMC) in Albuquerque but had been detained on May 13 and held at the Cibola County Correctional Center in Milan, New Mexico, in a transgender unit.

According to a statement by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), Hernandez was admitted to the hospital with symptoms of pneumonia, dehydration and complications associated with HIV.

“Later in the day she was transferred via air ambulance to LMC, where she remained in the intensive care unit until her passing. LMC medical staff pronounced her deceased May 25 at 3:32 a.m. Mountain Daylight Time, and identified the preliminary cause of death as cardiac arrest,” according to a statement.

Pueblo Sin Fronteras, the organization that assists migrants during their mission to the U.S. border, said in a Facebook post that immigration officials denied Hernandez medical care, and that she had been suffering for days.

Pueblo Sin Fronteras alleges that Hernandez “was processed and held for 5 days in the dreaded ‘icebox’ — holding cells with extremely low temperatures — in U.S. Customs & Border Protection suffering cold, lack of adequate food or medical care, with the lights on 24 hours a day, under lock & key. During her first week in the United States Roxy’s body and spirit quickly deteriorated. Once she was transferred to the immigrant prison in Cibola immigration authorities finally recognized (despite her having been in government custody for over a week) that she needed medical attention.”

According to a statement released by ICE, an agency spokesperson claims that they followed protocol and have contacted her next of kin. Hernandez is the sixth ICE detainee to die since Oct. 1, 2017. The release continues stating that Hernandez attempted to enter the U.S. illegally twice, once in 2005 and another in 2009. On Jan. 23, 2014, she illegally re-entered the country a third time, and was arrested, processed and removed March 11, 2014.

“Roxy died due to medical negligence by U.S. immigration authorities,” Pueblo Sin Fronteras stated on Facebook. “In other words, she was murdered, much like Claudia Gómez González was murdered by a Border Patrol agent’s bullet less than a week ago. Roxy died in the country she had sought to start a new life in, she died for being a transgender woman, a migrant who was treated neither with respect nor with dignity.”


READ: Here’s What Customs And Border Protection Is Now Saying About The Death Of An Undocumented Woman In Texas

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Here Are Some Queer Films And Shows To Watch To Start Pride Off Right

Entertainment

Here Are Some Queer Films And Shows To Watch To Start Pride Off Right

posefx / onedayatatimepoptv / Instagram

Pride Month is here and that means it is time to highlight the already celebrated LGBTQ+ shows and movies that have made a mark on us. Since Pride and the COVID pandemic are coinciding, it is a good time to watch some of the best examples of LGBTQ+ Latino entertainment.

“Moonlight”

Winner of the Academy Award for Best Picture, “Moonlight” brought Afro-Latino, Black, and queer storylines together. The movie follows a young Black man in Miami and his own trials and tribulations growing up with a mother who is addicted to drugs. His life is changed thanks to an Afro-Cuban man who takes him under his wing and shows him how to make it through his adolescents.

“To Wong Foo, Thanks For Everything! Julie Newmar”

One of the most popular classic films in LGBTQ+ cinema. “To Wong Foo, Thanks For Everything! Julie Newmar” follows three drag queens who drive from New York to Los Angeles for a national drag beauty pageant. Chi Chi Rodriguez, played by Joh Leguizamo, convinces the two competing queens to let him ride with them. Along the way, Rodriguez learns what it means to be a drag queen and the queens all learn a lot from a small, rural community filled with unexpected love and understanding.

“Pose”

“Pose” brings the ballroom culture straight to your living room. Set at the beginning in 1987 New York City during the peak of the AIDs epidemic, “Pose” empowers the queer people of color of the time. Ballroom culture is an underground dancing culture that has jumped into the mainstream because of “Pose.” The show takes the narrative of HIV-positive people of color in the time and empowers them rather than tears them down.

“Tangerine”

“Tangerine” is the story of a prostitute on a mission. The main character gets out of jail and learns that their boyfriend and pimp has started a new relationship with another woman. So, she and her friend set out to find him and teach the two a lesson for straying from her while she was incarcerated.

“Gentefied”

“Genetfied” is the latest Netflix hit and it is all about gentrification and the fight to keep Boyle Heights Latino. In the overall story, there is a lesbian relationship that is leaving everyone with all kinds of envy.

“One Day At A Time”

Netflix really misstepped here when they pulled the plug on their production of “One Day At A Time” but Pop TV saved the show. The first three seasons are currently on Netflix so you can still watch all of those episodes and enjoy the growing openness of Elena as she comes out.

“La casa de las flores”

This telenovela is truly one of the most incredible projects with LGBTQ+ characters today. Even Valentina, the famed drag queen from “RuPaul’s Drag Race” is in the latest season solidifying the shows LGBTQ+ status.

READ: The Trailer For The Final Season Of ‘La Casa De Las Flores’ Is Here And We’re Not Ready To Say Goodbye

A Gay Character Is The Lead Of Pixar’s Short ‘Out’ And It Will Hit You In The Feels

Entertainment

A Gay Character Is The Lead Of Pixar’s Short ‘Out’ And It Will Hit You In The Feels

Pixar

“Out” is the latest Pixar short with a heartwarming story that will make you cry buckets.

The studio-first, stars a gay male character named Greg who is struggling to come out as gay to his parents. Just when his parents come to help Greg move, a “rainbow-riding purple sparkly” cat and a pink dog, swap the dog’s body with Greg’s.

Sounds pretty adorable.

Pixar’s latest short follows Greg while he struggles to come out to his parents.

The short, which is just under 10 minutes, debuted on Friday on the Disney+ streaming service and was written and directed by Steven Clay Hunter. The filmmaker has produced various Pixar films, including “Toy Story 4” and “Finding Dory,” and has been an active part of Pixar’s SparkShorts series. If you already didn’t know, the shorts series are meant to highlight and discover new storytellers and give them space and support to experiment with different approaches to animation.

Of course, users on Twitter were quick to make the hashtag #PixarOut go viral in no time.

Many expressed their gratefulness for having a project that promotes diversity and love, while others lamented not having had access to such a film sooner when they were growing up and coming out.

The new Pixar film opens a pretty big door for Disney and its audiences.

Last year, the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD)revealed a study that found only 18.4% of mainstream films released in 2018 had included LGBTQ characters. At the same time it highlighted that none of Disney’s releases at the time had an LGBTQ character.

“Out” is on Disney + for you to check out!