Things That Matter

These Illustrations Tell The Stories Of DACA Recipients In Their Own Words

When the White House announced the rescission of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), Pablo Stanley, designer and co-founder at Carbon Health, felt the impact.

“It made me sad. It made it so hard to come to work and put on a happy face as though everything is okay,” says the Mexican-American artist.

Stanley immediately started brainstorming how he could use his talents to support those affected and take some action.

The illustrator decided to create portraits of DACA recipients, so they could share their stories in their own words. And that’s how Dreamer Stories was born.

“In just reading their stories and giving them a platform to tell their stories you realize that their experiences and everything that’s going on is so heavy,” says Stanley. “I feel honored to be a bit of a vehicle for sharing these stories with the world.”

While many DACA recipients are feeling fear, anxiety, and sadness, Stanley made sure to also share their joys and smiling faces. It’s his hope to create a portrait of their dreams and show them as the regular people they are, living their lives and not succumbing to the narrative the media tends to paint of them.

“They’re people who are alive and want to do more than cry on a corner,” says Stanley. “Many of them are activists themselves. The situation they’re in has given them this super power of empathy. When I asked them what their dream is many said to help other people that are in my situation.”

Estefanía works as a paralegal community advocate at the Equal Justice Center in Dallas.

Image credit: Pablo Stanley

“Despite struggles, limitations, and uncertainty a big achievement for me is that I am the first generation college student in my family. My family always told me that I couldn’t go to college because of my legal status. It took a huge toll on me but thanks to a 2001 state law in Texas, it would allow me, an undocumented student to pay in-state tuition as long as I proved I had lived in Texas for more than three years. I also graduated from my university debt-free through private scholarships and my parent’s sacrifices! Today, thanks to DACA I have a full-time job, I bought my first car, I got my driver’s license, and I was able to travel to Italy through advanced parole for educational purposes during my undergrad year. And now, I plan on continuing my education by going to law school and becoming an immigration lawyer.”

Read her full story here.

Gibrán works full-time in retail while also going to school.

Image credit: Pablo Stanley

As far as his dream:

“I think learning English has been the primary challenge for me, my friends say it’s great but I feel I can still improve.”

Read more here.

Alonso was born in Peru and emigrated to the U.S. when he was 11.

Image credit: Pablo Stanley

“Growing up undocumented in Utah truly shaped me into the person I am today. My experiences growing up in the margins of society inform the work I do, and the work I seek to continue doing in this life. I am passionate about working with undocumented students and families and strive to share all my knowledge and experiences with the undocumented community as well as the community as a whole.”

Read the rest of his story here.

Nayeli came to the U.S. when she was six and will graduate in December from college with a B.S. in web application development and a minor in marketing.

Image credit: Pablo Stanley

“My first dream is to create or take part in a business that provides change and opportunities for other cultural groups. My second dream is to contribute to the breaking down of the digital divide by teaching minority groups how to use technology to help improve their business or everyday lives.

My final and maybe my greatest dream is to be able to support my parents financially so that they can finally retire. They have sacrificed their lives and time so that I could have a better future, and I only wish to be able to repay that back.”

Here is the rest of Nayeli’s story.

To read more, go to DreamerStories.com.


READ: There Are Many Ways To Help DACAmented People. Here Are A Few.

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NFTs: What Are They And What To Do With Them

Things That Matter

NFTs: What Are They And What To Do With Them

Non Fungible Tokens, or NFTs, have been all over the news lately. The latest version of digital currency is having a moment as everyone gets in on the craze. Here’s a quick breakdown on what they are, how you can get one, and what to do with them.

The world is buzzing about non-fungible tokens.

NFTs are the latest craze in digital currency. Superficially, it looks no different than buy art digitally. NFTs are unlike other forms of cryptocurrency in that they are blockchain-based assets. People are able to exchange Bitcoins with other Bitcoins or equivalent amounts in other digital currency. This is not the case for NFTs. NFTs are unique to themselves. This gives people the chance to own a specific token.

The owner of the digital image can then resell the image for a profit or a loss based on the future of the market. This means that the NFT you buy today could bring in a big profit or a breathtaking loss.

There is a lot of concern about the environmental impact creating the NFT community is causing. According to The New York Times, studies are showing that creating digital art to sell as NFTs is creating large carbon footprints that are negatively impacting the environment. Some in the community are looking for a solution while others think there is no changing the environmental impact.

There is still a lot of debate about how NFTs really work.

There is one explanation that is going viral on Twitter and has caused a whole discussion about what NFTs really are and how they are valued. Like all sellable items, NFTs get their value from supply and demand. Their irreproducibility adds to their value because it is a unique item that only you own, much like a piece of art.

The first high-profile piece of art to sell as an NFT was Mike Winkelmann’s “Everydays: The First 5000 Days.” Winkelmann, also known as the digital artist Beeple, created a new piece of art every day for more than 13 years. The collage of these pieces of work sold by Christie’s for $69,346,250. The buyer was Vignesh Sundaresan, the founder of the Metapurse NFT project.

Yet, it is important to know that buying an NFT gives you ownership of the art, not the copyright.

“I think that people don’t understand that when you buy, you have the token [or NFT]. You can display the token and show you own the token, but, you don’t own the copyright,” Winkelmann, told CNBC Make It.

NFTs are part of the Ethereum blockchain.

As the popularity of NFTs continues to spike, so does the value of Ethereum. This means that if you want to get serious about the NFT investments you are seeing, you should consider getting yourself some Ethereum.

You can set up an account on Coinbase to start buying Ethereum if you are interested in joining in on the craze. Coinbase is a digital space where you can trade cryptocurrency.

If you want to get more into NFTs, check out mitú’s NFTs on OpenSea.

mitú is offering three different NFTs of the beloved Guacardo. The animated avocado is being sold in three “Lord of the Rings” inspired images. The bidding starts at 0.1 Ethereums (about $27). You can see the images on the mitú OpenSea page where the bidding has begun.

READ: Do You Combine Finances With Your Spouse? Latinas Answered!

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Doctored Image Of Ted Cruz In BDSM Gear Is Going Viral

Things That Matter

Doctored Image Of Ted Cruz In BDSM Gear Is Going Viral

An altered image of Sen. Ted Cruz in full BDSM gear is popping up all over social media right now. The conservative senator has sparked outrage from the nation several times during his career as a politician. Who could forget him taking a vacation to Mexico as Texans died from power outages connected to extreme winter weather?

This image of Sen. Ted Cruz first showed up in San Antonio.

@satxchill

Where you been Ted?! #fledcruz #cancruz #satx

♬ love – lofi.samurai

The photo has gone viral on social media after being photographed in San Antonio. The doctored image put Sen. Cruz’s face on the half-naked body of a man wearing a leather chest harness, leather boots, small underwear, gloves, and holding a riding crop. The body has “PROUD BOYS” tattooed across the stomach.

Some are offended for the man whose body is used in the image.

The image has sparked a conversation about fat, slut, and queer-shaming. It is never okay to shame people for their bodies, their sexual orientation, or their sexuality. The acting of shaming these things creates humiliation and dangerous prejudices against people.

But, the use of this imagery has a very specific and pointed message.

Sen. Cruz has a long history of opposing Pride parades, marriage equality, and the inclusion of LGBTQ+ people in nondiscrimination orders. The senator also made headlines during his campaign for president for hiring an adult entertainer in an attack ad against Marco Rubio.

One of Sen. Cruz’s ads featured Amy Lindsay, who had a history of appearing in softcore pornographic films. The Cruz campaign tapped her to act in the ad and pulled it just as quickly when Lindsay’s acting history came to light.

Sen. Cruz is up for reelection in 2024.

Seems safe to say that some Texans are already trying to launch their own campaigns to defeat Sen. Cruz. The 2018 race for his seat against Beto O’Rourke showed the potential for unseating the incumbent as the demographics continue to shift in the Lone Star State. The 2020 election also showed that Texas could turn blue sooner than most ever expected.

READ: AOC Gets Under Ted Cruz’s Skin With Crack About His Mexican Getaway After He Accuses Her Of Pushing For ‘open borders’

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