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Courts Have Ruled To Protect The DACA Program But These Seven States Didn’t Get The Memo

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In yet another another blow to Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), Texas and six other states are suing to end the program that would protect young undocumented immigrants from deportation. The lawsuit filed on Tuesday by Republican Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, comes a week after a federal judge ordered the Trump administration to continue the program which has been in the midst of a year long legal battle. Paxton had threatened legal action for the past year if the program didn’t end.

Earlier this year, a ruling by a U.S. District Court in California blocked the federal government from canceling DACA, forcing the administration to leave it in place indefinitely. Similar decisions were issued by district courts in New York and Washington. The Washington Circuit Court ruled on April 24 that the Trump administration has 90 days to fully restore DACA.

Texas, Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Nebraska, South Carolina and West Virginia are suing the U.S. government to end DACA.

This isn’t the first time Paxton has attempted to end programs similar to DACA. Back in 2014, Texas led a charge in suing the federal government over a new immigration policy the Obama administration was trying to roll out. The program was Deferred Action for Parent of Americans and Legal Permanent Residents (DAPA) and included a DACA expansion. The case was taken to 5th US Circuit Court of Appeals and in 2016 made its way to the Supreme Court, where justices deadlocked the case 4-4.

“Our lawsuit is about the rule of law, not the wisdom of any particular immigration policy,” Paxton said in a statement. “Left intact, DACA sets a dangerous precedent by giving the executive branch sweeping authority to ignore the laws enacted by Congress and change our nation’s immigration laws to suit a president’s own policy preferences.”

The GOP party has battled DACA since the program was put in place in 2012 by then President Obama.

Since President Donald Trump began his run for office, immigration reform has been one of his biggest targets with DACA at the top of his list. Upon taking office Trump removed privacy protections for DACA recipients with a provision in his executive order. Under the Obama administration, the information of DACA recipients was protected from ICE agents.

Immigration reform has been one of the most divisive issues in the country and has been more divided since Trump took office.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced last September it would end the DACA program by March 5, setting up a six-month deadline for Congress to address those who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children. However, the latest court decision from Washington means that United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement must accept renewal requests.

There are currently 689,000 DACA recipients in the US  as of Sept. 4, 2017.

At the program’s peak, 800,000 people were approved for DACA since it was launched in 2012 and 40,000 became legal permanent residents, obtaining green cards.

The next chapter for DACA could be decided in a Supreme Court case that could happen as early as this year.

This means that DACA renewals will likely remain open at least until the Supreme Court agrees to take up the case after the appeals courts rule which will be during the Court’s next term, which starts this October.


READ: A Third Federal Judge Ruled That The Trump Administration Didn’t Provide Enough Evidence To Rescind DACA

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A Lawsuit Claims That Employees In San Diego-Area Albertsons Were Banned From Speaking Spanish

Things That Matter

A Lawsuit Claims That Employees In San Diego-Area Albertsons Were Banned From Speaking Spanish

Werth Media / Flickr

Albertsons is facing controversy after a new lawsuit claims the retailer forbid employees from speaking Spanish in San Diego-area stores. According to a lawsuit filed in federal court on Thursday by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the retail chain developed the unwritten policy in 2012. Employees who were caught speaking Spanish would be publicly reprimanded by store managers, according to the lawsuit. Despite multiple employee complaints, the supermarket chain did not change the policy, forcing some employees to transfer.

A lawsuit filed by the EEOC claims employees in some stores were barred from speaking Spanish while working, including to Spanish-speaking customers.

The lawsuit specifies an Albertsons store located San Diego as subjecting “Hispanic employees to harassment and a hostile work environment” due to the imposed policies.

“It is extremely important for workers to feel safe in coming forward to report harassment,” Christopher Green, EEOC’s San Diego office director, told NBC San Diego. “It is equally important for employers to make certain that harassment is investigated and addressed appropriately.”

According to the lawsuit, an upper-level manager at an Albertsons store told Latino employees that “they could not speak Spanish anywhere on the premises regardless of whether they were on break.”

“While we cannot comment on this pending litigation specifically, Albertsons does not require that its employees speak English only,” company spokeswoman Jenna Watkinson told the LA Times. “Albertsons serves a diverse customer population and encourages employees with foreign language abilities to use those skills to serve its customers.”

Yet, according to The San Diego Union-Tribune, Albertsons employees Guadalupe Zamorano and Hermelinda Stevenson both filed complaints to management in 2012 after they were reprimanded for speaking Spanish. Both eventually requested transfers to different stores citing harassment.

There has been immediate backlash on social media due to claims of the lawsuit.

Many are defending the workers and even calling for a boycott to the supermarket chain, which employs some 280,000 employees across 35 states.

Coincidentally Albertsons posted a tweet about Cinco de Mayo that has some calling them “hypocrites”.

The lawsuit asks the court to order Albertsons to stop discriminating against employees based on their national origin, to compensate the aggrieved employees for monetary losses and emotional pain according to proof at trial, to award punitive damages and to pay the EEOC’s legal costs.


Read: Motel 6 Is Being Sued By Two States For Violating Privacy Acts By Giving Guests Lists To ICE

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