things that matter

Students Staged A National Walk Out For Gun Reform On The 19th Anniversary Of The Columbine Shooting

@Claire4Iowa / Twitter

It has been 19 years since two gunmen killed 13 people and injured 23 others at Columbine High School in one of the deadliest mass shootings in modern U.S. history. Two months ago, one gunman killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Today, on the 19th anniversary of the Columbine shooting, students across the country are participating in walkouts to honor those killed by gun violence. They are calling on their elected officials to take a stand and bring about common sense gun reform to prevent more school shootings.

April 20 is the anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting that claimed 13 lives.

At the time, the shooting was the worst mass shooting in the U.S. and changed the perception of safety in schools. Seniors Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold shot and killed 12 classmates and a teacher before committing suicide. The shooting made international news and Columbine became a household name.

Students across the country are walking out to protest the National Rifle Association and the lack of gun reform to mark the anniversary of Columbine.

Students also participated in demonstrations last month to mark the one month anniversary of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. The March for Our Lives event also took place last month to keep the issue in people’s minds during this election year.

Some people took their protest as close to lawmakers as possible.

The student activists from Parkland, Florida have been leading the movement for gun reform since the shooting on Feb. 14, 2018. While the students are protesting in a public way, they have continued to speak about the importance of voting.

Emma Gonzalez posted her own photos dressed in orange in solidarity with protesters.

All protesters were told to wear orange since it is the color associated with the gun reform movement.

Students have filled parks with their bodies and stood in silence to honor the lives lost to gun violence.

✊? ✊? ✊?

One proud sister posted a video of her brother protesting by himself outside of his middle school.

“So, I’m standing out here by myself on April 20. It’s the anniversary of Columbine, one of the worst mass shootings in the U.S.,” he says int he video. “Thirteen people were killed there. Twelve students. One of them was 14 years old. The 8th graders at my school are 14 years old, by the way, so I don’t understand why nobody is out here protesting with me about gun violence.”

Social media is filled with messages supporting the students in their fight.

And they continue to speak about the importance of voting.

“But we as a nation cannot afford routine mass murders. We need action now. We need to remind our politicians that this is us,” the speaker int he above video says. “There are our children who are dying and we will not rest until there is action. We gave them their power and we can take it away.”

Lastly, David Hogg, one of the faces of the movement, wants this day to be more than just a walkout.

He is calling on all protesters to truly use their day as a service to remember the victims of Columbine.


READ: Here’s How High School Students Across The Country Used Their Voices To Demonstrate For Gun Control

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

The Supreme Court Has Invalidated A Vaguely Worded Provision Allowing For Immigrants Convicted Of Crimes To Be Deported

Things That Matter

The Supreme Court Has Invalidated A Vaguely Worded Provision Allowing For Immigrants Convicted Of Crimes To Be Deported

Mark Fischer / Flickr

The US Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that a provision in the Immigration and Nationality Act is too vague to stand up in immigration court, according to Reuters. Trump-nominated Justice Neil Gorsuch joined the four liberal justices in invalidating a provision within the Immigration and Nationality Act. The provision has been used by immigration officials as grounds for deporting immigrants who committed certain felony crimes. However, the justices found that the wording of the provision was unconstitutionally vague, Reuters reports. Mainly, the justice had issue with how a crime can be categorized differently from state to state leaving severity of crimes up to the states. This gave immigration authority vague guidelines they could apply as they wished to deem people deportable.

“Today’s ruling significantly undermines DHS’s efforts to remove aliens convicted of certain violent crimes, including sexual assault, kidnapping, and burglary, from the United States,” U.S. Department of Homeland Security spokesman Tyler Houlton said in a statement. “By preventing the federal government from removing known criminal aliens, it allows our nation to be a safe haven for criminals and makes us more vulnerable as a result. The Secretary has met with hundreds of members of Congress over the last few months to implore them to take action on passing legislation to close public safety loopholes, such as these, that encourage illegal immigration and tie the hands of law enforcement.”

The decision was made in reference to case Session, Attorney General v. Dimaya. James Garcia Dimaya is an immigrant from the Philippines who was convicted of non-violent burglary twice. Immigration officials were trying to use the two convictions as ground to deport Dimaya back to the Philippines. However, immigration law experts say that the ruling will not invalidate a large number of deportation orders. Also, the ruling will not prevent immigrants charged and convicted with the crimes of murder, rape, counterfeiting and terrorism from being deported.

You can read more about the ruling on Reuters.

(H/T: Reuters)


READ: John Oliver Blasts U.S. Immigration Courts For Letting Toddlers Defend Themselves

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

Paid Promoted Stories