Things That Matter

As El Paso Grieves Their Loss, Here Is Everything We Know About The Victims Of The El Paso Massacre, Which Were Mostly Latino

Much of the nation was grief stricken over this weekend’s double terror attacks. On Saturday, El Paso and it’s large Latino community was racked by gun violence as an alleged White Nationalist opened fire on a Walmart upset about the “invasion” of Hispanics.

News about those killed and injured traveled quickly. So far it’s been confirmed that 22 people have been killed and dozens more were injured, some of them are still in critical condition.

Among the victims are 13 Mexican citizens (including the injured and dead), for whom the Mexican government is now vowing to take legal action against the US and the gunman.

Here’s everything we know about the victims so far:

Jordan and Andre Anchondo

This recently married couple, 25 and 24 respectively, had just celebrated their 1-year wedding anniversary and their eldest daughter was soon turning six. The couple had gone to Walmart to buy school supplies and clothes for their kids but their lives were violently cut short.

The moment he heard about the shooting, Tito Anchondo, Andre’s brother, began calling both his brother and sister-in-law but got no response. Several hours later, he received a call from authorities, who asked him to identify Jordan. He said he rushed to the hospital with the rest of his family to find Jordan, who had died, and his infant nephew, who survived but had several broken bones. Andre was not there.

On Sunday night, family members confirmed to The Post that Andre was killed too.

A 25-year-old woman and mother of three, Jordan Anchondo was killed while trying to shield her 2-month-old son, according to the AP.

“From the baby’s injuries, they said that more than likely my sister was trying to shield him,” Jamrowski told AP. “So when she got shot she was holding him and she fell on him, so that’s why he broke some of his bones. So he pretty much lived because she gave her life.”

Arturo Benavides

Arturo and his wife Patricia were nearly out of the Walmart when the gunmen opened fire. Patricia’s life was saved when someone pushed her into a bathroom stall, however, Arturo didn’t make it out alive.

The 60-year-old was a US Army veteran and had recently retired from working as a bus driver for El Paso’s public transit agency. The couple had been married for more than 30 years.

In an interview with the Washington Post, Jacklin Luna, Arturo’s great-niece, said: “If anyone ever needed anything, he was the first one there: If we needed a ride, a shirt or a meal, he was always the first person to offer anything he had. Whenever we all went out to eat, he would pay the whole bill, he didn’t want anyone to spend a dime.”

Javier Rodriguez

At just 15-years-old, Javier was among the youngest victims from Saturday’s attack.

The Clint Independent School District confirmed his death in a tweet Monday. “We are deeply saddened to learn of the loss of one of our students,” the district said. “Our heartfelt condolences and prayers are with his parents and family.”

Javier was just weeks away from starting his sophomore year of high school. “He was such a loving boy,” Elvira Rodriguez, his aunt, told the Arizona Republic. She said he loved to play soccer and did well in school.

Elsa Mendoza Marquez

Elsa Mendoza Marquez, a Mexican schoolteacher who was married and the mother of two adult children, was another of the victims.

According to family members, she crossed the border on Saturday and entered Walmart while family members waited outside the store. Her husband, Antonio de la Mora, called her “full of light” and “the most wonderful of women” in a tribute post on Facebook.

Sara Esther Regalado

Sara Esther Regalado was named by the Mexican foreign ministry as a victim.

Her granddaughter Vielka Yu shared images on social media of her and Adolfo Cerros Hernandez, Ms Regalado’s husband. While searching for news, Ms Yu wrote: “My grandparents were shopping at Walmart and Cielo Vista when the shooting happened.”

Adolfo Cerros Hernandez

In another death confirmed by the Mexican Foreign Ministry, it’s reported that the husband of Sara Esther Regalado also died in the attack.

Their daughter Sandra Cerros wrote: “With deep pain in our hearts, let us inform you that our dear parents Adolfo Hills Hernandez and Sarita Regalado died victims of the unfortunate shooting happened yesterday August 3 at Wal-Mart.

“We are devastated. These have been very difficult hours. But now we are united. We thank you infinitely for your prayers, your support, concern, calls and messages.”

Leo Campos

A statement posted online read: “One of PSJAs Alumni life was taken by yesterday’s tragedy in El Paso. We would like to express our sincere condolences for his family during this difficult time. Rest In Peace Leo Campos.”

His former school also paid tribute, with school board president Jesse Zambrano saying: “Leo Campos was a great athlete and friend to many during his time at PSJA High. He was a goalie for the soccer team and a kicker for the football team.

“Leo was well liked and a role model to many athletes that looked up to him, including me. We ask for the entire PSJA community to join us in prayer. Rest in peace, hermano.”

Angie Englisbee

Angie Englisbee was described by her grandson Jacob Hallberg as “the hero of our family.”

Hallberg told BuzzFeed News that after his grandfather died of a heart attack at age 38, Englisbee had to find a job and take care of their seven kids alone. He said she “raised seven successful great children on her own,” including his mother, Edie Hallberg.

Maribel Hernandez

The partner of Leo Campos, Maribel Hernandez was killed as the pair shopped, having dropped their dog off at the groomers.

Her brother, Al Hernandez, confirmed her death as well as Mr Campos’s. He said he knew something was wrong when he received a call from the groomers when they had not collected their dog.

Jorge Calvillo García

Jorge Calvillo García died shielding his granddaughter Emily from bullets, Jorge’s nephew, Raul Ortega, told KFOX14. Calvillo and Emily were raising funds for a soccer team that Calvillo coaches outside of the Walmart.

García was visiting his son Luis Calvillo, who was also shot and injured, and is from Torreón, Mexico, according to Foreign Secretary Marcelo Ebrard.

Gloria Irma Marquez

Gloria’s death was confirmed by the Mexican consulate. She was one of the many victims who was in El Paso shopping from across the border in Ciudad Juárez.

Stay tuned as we update this list with additional information about the victims, their friends, and family as it becomes available.

If you would like to help the victims of this weekend’s deadly terror attacks, including the one directly targeting Latino victims in El Paso, please consider making a donation to Paso del Norte Community Foundation here. And if you’re in the El Paso area, please consider donating much-needed blood – Lyft will even give you a free roundtrip ride for the donation.

READ: El Paso Needs Blood Donors After Another White Mass Shooter Kills 19 Walmart Shoppers

Mexico’s Newest Growing Cartel Ambushed Mexican Police Killing 14 And Injuring 9

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Mexico’s Newest Growing Cartel Ambushed Mexican Police Killing 14 And Injuring 9

lopezobrador / Instagram

Minutes after Mexico’s President Lopez Obrador told reporters that his new approach to curb cartel violence is working, Mexico’s fast-growing threat, the Jalisco New Generation Cartel (CJNG), killed 14 police officers and set their cars on fire during a deadly ambush. The police convoy was passing through El Aguaje, a small town in the state of Michoacan, to serve a warrant when 20 armed vehicles ambushed the officers. Fourteen officers were declared dead and another nine were injured.

“You can’t fight fire with fire. You can’t fight violence with violence … you have to fight evil by doing good.” Obrador said at a news conference on Monday morning. While Obrador, a year into his term, continued to speak about how his new policy is affecting change, police officers were calling for backup. “I’m dying,” one officer barely blurted on his radio, according to audio recordings of police scanners at the time.

As first responders arrived on the scene, they found handwritten messages, signed “CJNG.”

Credit: @AlertaGDL / Twitter

Families of the victims are angry that their loved ones weren’t more heavily armed to defend themselves against the thirty gunmen who attacked the police convoy from behind. One day after the attack, a memorial service became a town hall of sorts. Grieving family members shouted at Michoacán Governor Silvano Aureoles, “Like sheep to the slaughter!” 

Five families refused to allow the coffins of their loved ones to be present in the company of those they feel were responsible for the deaths: the officials who didn’t adequately arm the police to defend themselves. 

Obrador’s strategy to end cartel violence is two-fold: end corruption and provide resources to poverty-stricken regions.

Credit: lopezobrador / Instagram

“We are going to continue with our strategy,” López Obrador later said. “For us it is very important for there to be well-being, that peace with justice can be achieved … and also avoiding that authorities mix with crime.” Experts think Obrador’s strategy is smart for long-term success in stabilizing Mexico. Still, in the short-term, murders have only increased in Mexico. Last year, a record number of 29,000 murders were recorded, and 2019 may just break that record.

Falko Ernst, a Mexican analyst for the International Crisis Group, says Michoacán will continue to be “deep narco-war territory” until the state develops a strategy to de-signify the land.

Credit: @falko_ernst / Twitter

In a Twitter thread, Ernst recalled the decades-long history of cartel conflict in a small, rural village called El Aguaje. It “sits on a key overland road connecting the Hot Land region with the Sierra Madre, and was once a stronghold of the Milenio Cartel, big-time coke runners in the ’90s/early 2000s,” Ernst tweeted. At the time, a young Nemesio Oseguera Cervantes, who would later become “El Mencho” and the boss of CJNG, was a member of the Milenio cartel. 

Ernst was there in 2011 when Milenio drug lords were dragged out of their mansions and executed. “La Familia” then took over the town, until it split into two conflicting gangs. That’s when El Mencho broke away to form the Jalisco (or CJNG) cartel.

Now, El Mencho, personally ousted by La Familia, is warring for their territory, leaving civilians in the crossfire.

Credit: lopezobrador / Instagram

El Mencho lived in the U.S. at one point, without papers, and served three years in prison for selling drugs stateside. As soon as he was released in 1997, he was deported to Mexico, where he went on to serve on the Jalisco state police force. For some reason, he left the force to join the Milenio cartel. El Mencho was born just a few miles away from El Aguaje. Now, he’s leading CJNG to reclaim what they think belongs to them–la puebla del Aguaje. 

The DEA has dubbed El Mencho one of their “most wanted,” and has offered a $10 million bounty for his arrest.

“El Chapo was violent, but El Mencho has taken it to a new level,” the lead DEA agent told Univision.

Credit: @KonnieMoments1 / Twitter

“Decapitations, dissolving bodies in acid, public executions, ripping out the heart, killing women and children, bombings against people. It happens almost every day,” DEA agent Kyle Mori told Univision. “El Chapo was violent, but El Mencho has taken it to a new level.” 

In August, CJNG hung nine bodies from a bridge in Uruapan, Michoacán, and hung up a large banner that read, “Lovely people. Carry on with your day.” Ten other bodies were dumped on the road nearby.

READ: Mexico Is Reeling After A Massive Gun Battle Over The Capture Of El Chapo’s Son

Kansas City Police Are Looking For Two Men Suspected Of Shooting Patrons Of A Tequila Bar

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Kansas City Police Are Looking For Two Men Suspected Of Shooting Patrons Of A Tequila Bar

Sherae Honeycutt / Facebook

It was a normal Saturday night for Tequila Kansas City Bar (TKC) bartender, Jose Valdez. He was serving new customers and old when a familiar, unwelcome face walked in at 11 p.m. asking for a drink. Valdez refused to serve the man, recalling the issues he’s caused the bar in the past. The man threw a glass at him and he was promptly escorted out. At 1:30 a.m., the same man walked back into the bar with a friend and handguns. Smoke filled the tiny room as they shot people at random.

Four Latino men were killed and five other victims were wounded. TKC is a private, members-only bar that has always been regarded as a “safe space” for the Latino community. Three of the slain were second-generation TKC patrons. Their parents were also members.

TKC usually staffs a security guard, but he didn’t show up that night.

Credit: @OfficialJoelF / Twitter

The owner of Tequila KC Bar told KMBC reporter Matt Evans that the bar scheduled a security guard that night, but “he never showed up.” Kansas City, Kansas Police confirmed that they had arrived on the scene earlier in the night. The suspect had picked a fight with someone as he was being escorted out and the two brawled outside. By the time the police arrived, the fight was over and they left.

Shock and adrenaline allowed the wounded to escape from the bar before the pain set in.

Credit: @ellemoxley / Twitter

Two hours later, the suspect arrived with an accomplice and handguns. Survivors recall hearing at least a dozen gunshots, and could barely see through the gun smoke.

“They went off so quick I didn’t think it was gunshots,” customer Michael Barajas told the Kansas City Star.

The two gunmen are still at large.

Credit: Kansas City Police Department

Police have released security camera images of the suspects, in hopes that anyone who recognizes them will come forward. Police have yet to name the suspects, and police spokesman Officer Thomas Tomasic told The Kansas City Star that he doesn’t believe the shooting was racially motivated. “It’s a pretty small bar,” Tomasic told the paper. “You have two guys come in, start shooting, people are just running. People are just running wherever they can.”

Victim Alfredo Calderon had a 6-year-old son and 4-year-old daughter to raise.

Credit: Alfredo Calderon / Facebook

While police haven’t released the names of any of the victims, some family members are coming forward to remember their deceased. Juan Ramirez told reporters that his 29-year-old nephew, Alfredo Calderon, died in the shooting. “We’re just in shock and disbelief,” Ramirez told The Kansas City Star, adding that his nephew had “nothing to do with it.”

This wasn’t bartender Valdez’s first shooting either. “I don’t know what to make of it,” he told The Kansas City Star, through tears. “A sad day for everybody who lost their lives and their families. How can you go into a place full of people and just start shooting?” He said he hugged his own niños Sunday morning, saying “pray to God I’m here.”

When a witness’s fiancé was shot, she tried to stop the bleeding and “held him till he took his last breath.”

Shay Celedon was at TKC with her best friend and her fiancé, both of whom have yet to be identified. Celedon said the two were waiting until after her niece’s quinceañera to get down to wedding planning hoping to tie the knot in October 2020. The three were enjoying their night until they witnessed the violent fight outside the bar. Celedon got a sinking feeling and decided to go home for fear that “something bad would happen.”

“None of it really seems real right now,” she told CNN. “We were sitting here yesterday evening having drinks with my best friend’s fiancé. I go home, go to bed, get woken up two hours later that he’s deceased, and she held him till he took his last breath, and tried to bring him back and keep pressure on his gunshot wound. And it was just one fatal shot that took him from us.”

Tequila Kansas City Bar “was a home away from home, you could say.”

Credit: Sherae Honeycutt / Facebook

Toni Maciel, 36, knew seven of the nine victims personally. While she returned to TKC the following day to be with her “TKC family” and community, she doesn’t feel safe anymore. Maciel knows the wife of the alleged shooter. During a karaoke night just two days prior, she witnessed him physically abuse his wife. Maciel intervened and asked him to leave. “This was a home away from home, you could say,” she told The Kansas City Star. “But after this, I don’t know what would happen with our community.”

Tequila Kansas City Bar hosted a vigil for the victim Sunday night at 7 p.m.

As we report on this story, the community is gathering around TKC to pay vigil to the deceased. Kansas Governor Laura Kelly released a statement saying she continues “to be frustrated that these mass shootings and killings occur with regular frequency. Our nation has an obligation to address this ongoing public health crisis.”

READ: Some People Claim This Sandy Hook PSA Has Gone “Too Far” In Illustrating the Impact of School Shootings