Things That Matter

As El Paso Grieves Their Loss, Here Is Everything We Know About The Victims Of The El Paso Massacre, Which Were Mostly Latino

Much of the nation was grief stricken over this weekend’s double terror attacks. On Saturday, El Paso and it’s large Latino community was racked by gun violence as an alleged White Nationalist opened fire on a Walmart upset about the “invasion” of Hispanics.

News about those killed and injured traveled quickly. So far it’s been confirmed that 22 people have been killed and dozens more were injured, some of them are still in critical condition.

Among the victims are 13 Mexican citizens (including the injured and dead), for whom the Mexican government is now vowing to take legal action against the US and the gunman.

Here’s everything we know about the victims so far:

Jordan and Andre Anchondo

This recently married couple, 25 and 24 respectively, had just celebrated their 1-year wedding anniversary and their eldest daughter was soon turning six. The couple had gone to Walmart to buy school supplies and clothes for their kids but their lives were violently cut short.

The moment he heard about the shooting, Tito Anchondo, Andre’s brother, began calling both his brother and sister-in-law but got no response. Several hours later, he received a call from authorities, who asked him to identify Jordan. He said he rushed to the hospital with the rest of his family to find Jordan, who had died, and his infant nephew, who survived but had several broken bones. Andre was not there.

On Sunday night, family members confirmed to The Post that Andre was killed too.

A 25-year-old woman and mother of three, Jordan Anchondo was killed while trying to shield her 2-month-old son, according to the AP.

“From the baby’s injuries, they said that more than likely my sister was trying to shield him,” Jamrowski told AP. “So when she got shot she was holding him and she fell on him, so that’s why he broke some of his bones. So he pretty much lived because she gave her life.”

Arturo Benavides

Arturo and his wife Patricia were nearly out of the Walmart when the gunmen opened fire. Patricia’s life was saved when someone pushed her into a bathroom stall, however, Arturo didn’t make it out alive.

The 60-year-old was a US Army veteran and had recently retired from working as a bus driver for El Paso’s public transit agency. The couple had been married for more than 30 years.

In an interview with the Washington Post, Jacklin Luna, Arturo’s great-niece, said: “If anyone ever needed anything, he was the first one there: If we needed a ride, a shirt or a meal, he was always the first person to offer anything he had. Whenever we all went out to eat, he would pay the whole bill, he didn’t want anyone to spend a dime.”

Javier Rodriguez

At just 15-years-old, Javier was among the youngest victims from Saturday’s attack.

The Clint Independent School District confirmed his death in a tweet Monday. “We are deeply saddened to learn of the loss of one of our students,” the district said. “Our heartfelt condolences and prayers are with his parents and family.”

Javier was just weeks away from starting his sophomore year of high school. “He was such a loving boy,” Elvira Rodriguez, his aunt, told the Arizona Republic. She said he loved to play soccer and did well in school.

Elsa Mendoza Marquez

Elsa Mendoza Marquez, a Mexican schoolteacher who was married and the mother of two adult children, was another of the victims.

According to family members, she crossed the border on Saturday and entered Walmart while family members waited outside the store. Her husband, Antonio de la Mora, called her “full of light” and “the most wonderful of women” in a tribute post on Facebook.

Sara Esther Regalado

Sara Esther Regalado was named by the Mexican foreign ministry as a victim.

Her granddaughter Vielka Yu shared images on social media of her and Adolfo Cerros Hernandez, Ms Regalado’s husband. While searching for news, Ms Yu wrote: “My grandparents were shopping at Walmart and Cielo Vista when the shooting happened.”

Adolfo Cerros Hernandez

In another death confirmed by the Mexican Foreign Ministry, it’s reported that the husband of Sara Esther Regalado also died in the attack.

Their daughter Sandra Cerros wrote: “With deep pain in our hearts, let us inform you that our dear parents Adolfo Hills Hernandez and Sarita Regalado died victims of the unfortunate shooting happened yesterday August 3 at Wal-Mart.

“We are devastated. These have been very difficult hours. But now we are united. We thank you infinitely for your prayers, your support, concern, calls and messages.”

Leo Campos

A statement posted online read: “One of PSJAs Alumni life was taken by yesterday’s tragedy in El Paso. We would like to express our sincere condolences for his family during this difficult time. Rest In Peace Leo Campos.”

His former school also paid tribute, with school board president Jesse Zambrano saying: “Leo Campos was a great athlete and friend to many during his time at PSJA High. He was a goalie for the soccer team and a kicker for the football team.

“Leo was well liked and a role model to many athletes that looked up to him, including me. We ask for the entire PSJA community to join us in prayer. Rest in peace, hermano.”

Angie Englisbee

Angie Englisbee was described by her grandson Jacob Hallberg as “the hero of our family.”

Hallberg told BuzzFeed News that after his grandfather died of a heart attack at age 38, Englisbee had to find a job and take care of their seven kids alone. He said she “raised seven successful great children on her own,” including his mother, Edie Hallberg.

Maribel Hernandez

The partner of Leo Campos, Maribel Hernandez was killed as the pair shopped, having dropped their dog off at the groomers.

Her brother, Al Hernandez, confirmed her death as well as Mr Campos’s. He said he knew something was wrong when he received a call from the groomers when they had not collected their dog.

Jorge Calvillo García

Jorge Calvillo García died shielding his granddaughter Emily from bullets, Jorge’s nephew, Raul Ortega, told KFOX14. Calvillo and Emily were raising funds for a soccer team that Calvillo coaches outside of the Walmart.

García was visiting his son Luis Calvillo, who was also shot and injured, and is from Torreón, Mexico, according to Foreign Secretary Marcelo Ebrard.

Gloria Irma Marquez

Gloria’s death was confirmed by the Mexican consulate. She was one of the many victims who was in El Paso shopping from across the border in Ciudad Juárez.

Stay tuned as we update this list with additional information about the victims, their friends, and family as it becomes available.

If you would like to help the victims of this weekend’s deadly terror attacks, including the one directly targeting Latino victims in El Paso, please consider making a donation to Paso del Norte Community Foundation here. And if you’re in the El Paso area, please consider donating much-needed blood – Lyft will even give you a free roundtrip ride for the donation.

READ: El Paso Needs Blood Donors After Another White Mass Shooter Kills 19 Walmart Shoppers

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Seven-Year-Old Jaslyn Adams Fatally Shot In Drive-Thru Of A Chicago McDonald’s

Things That Matter

Seven-Year-Old Jaslyn Adams Fatally Shot In Drive-Thru Of A Chicago McDonald’s

Jaslyn Adams was only 7 years old. Her age and innocence should have kept her shielded from the brutalities of her life and yet, even something as special as her father-daughter date to McDonald’s could not protect her.

While on a drive with her 29-year-old father, Adams was shot at and killed this past Sunday.

Adams was shot multiple times and pronounced dead.

According to reports, employees at the McDonald’s employee saw two men jump out of another car and ambush the Adams family car. The men fired into the car multiple times, striking Jaslyn multiple times in the body and her father in the torso.

A police vehicle at the scene rushed Jaslyn to a nearby hospital. She was pronounced dead at the hospital while her father is still being hospitalized and in serious condition.

No suspects have been arrested.

“It’s really emotional now for my family,”  Tawny McMullen, the victim’s aunt told WBBM. “She was just … sweet and outgoing. Really talkative, really lovable.” McMullen went onto lament how an average regular father-daughter trip to McDonald’s could end in such tragedy. “Y’all, please put the guns down,” McMullen went on to say “My 8-year-old baby says she doesn’t want to go out and play because she is scared that she is going to be shot.”

In response to the shooting, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot underlined how heartbroken she was.

“Our kids want to play. My kids can’t even go out the door because of this violence. Please put the guns down,” Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot commented. “This unthinkable act of violence has no place here. The epidemic of gun violence cutting our children’s lives short cannot go on.” 

Jaslyn’s death coincides with the recent murder of 13-year-old Adam Toledo who was also a child.

https://twitter.com/search?q=adam%20toledo&src=typed_query&f=image

Toledo was killed on March 29 by a Chicago police officer. Bodycam footage of Toledo’s murders shows “less than a second passed between when the boy is seen holding a handgun” and he was shot by the officer.

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Latino Man Whose Wife Died In Atlanta Spa Was Handcuffed, ‘Treated Like A Suspect’

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Latino Man Whose Wife Died In Atlanta Spa Was Handcuffed, ‘Treated Like A Suspect’

As we continue to learn more about the attack on Atlanta’s Asian-American community that left eight dead, we also are learning about Mario González – a survivor of the attack who was treated like a suspect by the Cherokee Sheriff Department.

Despite having lost his wife in the gunfire, police refused to share that news with González as he was handcuffed for hours amid the chaotic scene that was unfolding in the Atlanta suburbs.

A survivor of the Atlanta spa attacks says he was treated like a suspect instead of a victim.

The Latino man and husband who survived the Atlanta spa shootings that killed his wife says cops treated him like a suspect instead of a grieving victim — keeping him handcuffed for hours without telling him his spouse was dead.

“They had me at the police station for all that time until they investigated who was responsible or what had happened,” Mario González said during an interview with the Spanish-language news site Mundo Hispanico. “In the end, they told me my wife had died.

“They knew I was her husband,” Gonzalez said. “Then they told me she was dead when I wanted to know before. I don’t know, maybe because I’m Mexican,” he said. “Because the truth is that they treated me very badly.”

Law enforcement hasn’t responded to the allegations but are already facing severe backlash.

Representatives for the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Office did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment on Sunday, but the accusations leveled by Mr. González come after the agency had already faced scrutiny after a spokesman for the Sheriff’s Office described the gunman as having “a really bad day.”

The spokesman, Capt. Jay Baker, was no longer the office’s public representative on the case, and the sheriff, Frank Reynolds, apologized and defended Captain Baker as not intending to disrespect the victims or their families. “We regret any heartache Captain Baker’s words may have caused,” Sheriff Reynolds said.

González and his wife had been on a date night when the massacre took place.

The couple had arrived to Young’s Asian Massage for a fun date night, where they’d both enjoy a relaxing massage. They arrived shortly before the shooting started, Mr. González said in the video interview, and they were ushered into separate rooms for their massages.

Mr. González had met Ms. Yaun at a Waffle House restaurant, where he was a customer and she was a server. Ms. Yaun had been a single mother, raising a 13-year-old son. The couple married last year and had a daughter, who is now 8 months old. “What I need most right now is support,” Mr. González said in the interview.

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