Things That Matter

He Married A Woman From El Salvador And Tried To Bribe ICE To Deport Her And Her Daughter When The Relationship Soured

A Portland man was sentenced to four months in federal prison on Monday after attempting to deport his estranged wife and daughter. According to the Orgenian, Antonio O. Burgos, 48, reached out to an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officer and offered him money in exchange for getting his wife deported from the U.S. This all began last May when Burgos followed an ICE officer from the agency’s Portland office to a parking lot in Vancouver, Washington and offered money.

A man has been sentenced to prison for attempting to bribe an immigration officer several times to deport his estranged wife and child.

Antonio Burgos met and married his wife in El Salvador but the relationship soured after he brought his wife and her daughter to the U.S. Reports say that he planned to bribe the officer to send his family back to El Salvador. The bribery attempt occurred in the midst of the couple’s divorce.

When Burgos followed the officer last May, it was the first of several bribe offers. He confronted and gave the officer his contact information after the offer was declined, federal prosecutors said. The ICE agent would report the incident to the agency’s Office of Professional Responsibility.

An investigation into the bribery attempt would prove that Burgos was ready to pay to have his wife deported back to El Salvador. The ICE officer made the first of two recorded calls to Burgos on May 31 during which he attempted to pay $3,000 for his wife’s deportation. On June 5 the officer made a second recorded call and again Burgos offered money.

The ICE agent then set a meeting with Burgos and it was then that he increased his offer.

On June 6, Burgos and the officer would meet again for an in-person meeting. It was then when he tried to bribe the officer once more, offering to pay $4,000 for the removal of his wife and his wife’s child.

According to ICE officials, Burgos gave the officer half of the bribe money during that meeting and agreed to provide the rest of the money after his family was deported.

Burgos was arrested on June 29 when he met the officer again and was carrying the other $2,000 at the time. He would plead guilty in November to bribery of a public official.

In case you didn’t know, attempting to bribe a federal officer is against the law.

ICE officials released a public statement this week saying that Burgos “will face the justice he deserves.” The case is yet another example of individuals unaware of basic laws and regulations when it comes to the attempt of bribing public officials.

“Criminals who attempt to disrupt and dismantle our operations by attempting to bribe public officials will not be tolerated, Brad Bench, special agent in charge of Homeland Security Investigations, Seattle office, said in a press release.”Yesterday’s verdict is an excellent example of both HSI and the OPR’s dedication to ending these type of brazen acts and reinforcing the public’s trust in our officers.”

READ: An Arizona Border Patrol Agent Spent 6 Years Arresting Immigrants While Being Undocumented Himself

Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo Are The Women Fighting To Find The Stolen Children During The Argentine Dictatorship

Things That Matter

Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo Are The Women Fighting To Find The Stolen Children During The Argentine Dictatorship

Sundance Institute

During the 1970s a group of desperate Argentinian mothers began protesting government officials and holding them accountable for the human rights violations that had been committed in the military junta  known as the Dirty War. The determined women violated the government’s law against mass assembly and risked the ire of Argentina’s military dictatorship to expose the government’s human rights violations. The biggest part of their fight however had been to expose the kidnapping of over 30,000 individuals known today as “Desaparecidos” or “the disappeared.”

The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo (or, the Asociación Madres de Plaza de Mayo) is a movement of Argentine mothers who campaigned to find out what happened to their children who had “disappeared” during the 1976 government takeover.

The mothers’ tragic stories began in 1976. At the time the Argentine military had toppled the presidency of Isabel Perón. According to History.com, “it was part of a larger series of political coups called Operation Condor, a campaign sponsored and supported by the United States.” The new military dictatorship resulted in the Dirty War, which was ultimately a fight against the Argentinian people. It opened doors to a period of state-sponsored torture and terrorism and saw the government turn against Argentina’s citizens, targeting those suspected of being aligned with leftist, socialist or social justice. As part of the rule of terror, the government kidnapped and killed an estimated 30,000 people. They also made great efforts to cover up the dead and missing people.

But the family members and friends of the missing victims fought for the truth.

The mothers and relatives of people who went missing during the war searched for their loved ones and began to stage protests at the Plaza de Mayo in the 1980s. 

According to History.com “Some of the mothers of the disappeared were grandmothers who had seen their daughters whisked away and presumably killed and their grandchildren given away to other families. Even after the Dirty War ended in 1983, the Grandmothers of the Plaza Mayo have searched for answers and worked to identify children who grew up without any knowledge of their true parents.”

Today the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo have verified the identities of 128 stolen children, thanks to DNA identification techniques but the fight of these mothers and grandmothers lives on. Sadly, thousands of Argentinian children remain missing.

The Mothers of Plaza de Mayo is a 1985 Argentine documentary film that highlights the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo.

At the time of its release, it was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature and in 2013, received an update on “Abuelas: Grandmothers on a Mission” which highlights the work of the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo in Argentina.

The Police’s Reaction To The Black Lives Matter Protests For George Floyd Vs. Anti-Quarantine Demonstrators Says A Lot

Things That Matter

The Police’s Reaction To The Black Lives Matter Protests For George Floyd Vs. Anti-Quarantine Demonstrators Says A Lot

Stephen Maturen / Stringer

Derek Chauvin (a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis Police Department) pinned George Floyd to the ground by kneeling on his neck for seven minutes.

For the first three minutes of being restrained Floyd (a 46-year-old Black man) pled for his life begging Chauvin to remove his knee because he couldn’t breathe. After four minutes Floyd stopped moving, and bystanders capturing video of the request determined that he was unresponsive. The aftermath of his death after sparked explosive protests and reminders, yet again, that Black people are not safe in this country and continue to. be subjected to inequality.

On Tuesday morning, video of the incident that took place on a sidewalk in Minneapolis surfaced online fueling anger and protests.

There’s so much in the video that is distressing, but hearing Floyd begging the officer to let up and repeating “I can’t breathe” is only a small part that has once fueled the Black Lives Matter movement. After all, we’ve heard those words before. In 2014, Eric Garner, uttered the same ones while dying under police brutality in New York.

At the time of his death, Floyd had been facing arrest. The officers involved in the incident had been called to the scene due to a “forgery in progress” in the Powderhorn Park neighborhood of Minneapolis. Note, forgery while a serious crime is a non-violent one.

Darnella Frazier is the woman who captured the video on her phone and posted the footage on Facebook for the world to see.

On Tuesday, May 26, Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo announced that the officers involved had been placed on leave. Later on in the day, four responding officers were fired and the Federal Bureau of Investigation announced the incident was being reviewed.

Reactions to the protests show another glaring reminder of the treatment of Black people in the United States vs. white.

Reactions to anti-mask protests and demonstrations against government stay-at-home orders in the past few weeks have been met with stoic reactions.

You’ve seen the images. In the face of demonstrators furious about the safety restrictions implemented to combat COVID-19, police officers and government officials have responded primarily with nonviolence. We’ve seen no stun grenades or tear gas.

But the crowds of Black protestors rallying for “Justice for George” have been met with riot gear and chemical agents. According to reports around 8:00 pm of the protests police in riot gear fired sandbag rounds, rubber bullets, and pepper spray.

Once again, Black people are being forced to fight for their lives while non-Black people of color get off easy while saying or doing little from the sidelines.