Things That Matter

These 11 Moments From ‘On My Block’ Are Some Of The Realest Latino Moments Captured On Film

Netflix recently announced a few weeks ago that its coming-of-age comedy ‘On My Block’ would be renewed for a second season. As fans anticipate what’s to come for the show’s star-crossed lovers of Ruby Martinez and Olivia, and the rest of the gang, we’re looking back on the poignant moments that celebrated Latino culture in the show’s first season. Warning: Spoilers ahead if you haven’t watched the ‘Goonies’-esque show!

1. The struggle (and joys) of living under a multigenerational roof.

CREDIT: Netflix

Ruby Martinez is thrilled to get his own room after sharing it for years with his twin siblings—until his abuela’s room has a plumbing mishap and leaves him with a new roommate.

While living with your abuela might not seem like the coolest idea at first, Ruby shows you can eventually be thankful for having a go-to sage to advise you during life’s ups and downs. She might even get along better with your friends than you do. Appreciate the time you have with your abuela, Ruby.

2. The light-up nativity set.

CREDIT: Netflix

For many Latinos who grew up Catholic, you just weren’t ready for Jose Feliciano to wish you a ‘Feliz Navidad’ until the light-up camel and baby Jesus were proudly displayed by your parents on the front lawn. In order to have a conversation with his mom, Ruby needs to put away the baby, St. Joseph, lamb and camel while she’s cleaning the house.

3. Getting your quince dress fitted is a family affair.

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Last min #MetGala glam @Jason.genao

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To be ready for their big day, many teenage girls took their ruffled dresses to seamstresses around the neighborhood to cinch the waist and hem the edge. Ruby’s abuela likes to be efficient and has Ruby do the modeling for her.

4. Taking care of abuela’s religious objects is very important.

CREDIT: Netflix

Ruby’s grandma was all of our Abuelas when she had to find the baby Jesus statue that was blessed by the bishop. Jamal tries to be technical by telling her it’s toddler Jesus, not baby Jesus, since the statue can stand.

And there is no convincing her otherwise.

CREDIT: Netflix

But abeula was not having it. Lesson learned.

5. Nicknames in the family are a must.

CREDIT: Netflix

Nacho, Chuy, Coyo, Monse…a nickname in a large Latino family is a rite of passage and Ruby has been holding his nickname down for years—until Olivia comes to stay with his family and he immediately wants to be referred to as ‘Ruben.’ Abuela doesn’t let him live it down though and chuckles while asking, “Since when?”

Nothing gets past abuela! ? ? 

6. Gathering around the table to make tamales is the family tradition.

CREDIT: Netflix

Growing up Latino, one of the most treasured memories for familias was gathering around the kitchen to make tamales. Monse and Cesar share a sweet moment (and look) while helping Ruby’s abuela mix the masa for some bomb tamales.

7. Lighting saint candles during a blackout because you have so many.

CREDIT: Netflix

Se fue la luuuzzz. It’s always a good idea to have candles around your house in case the electricity goes out, and you can be sure your abuela has *plenty* of saint candles at her disposal if that’s what she’s into. Ruby’s family is on top of it and game night is still possible thanks to these holy candles.

8. Quince. Waltz. Practice.

CREDIT: Netlfix

What was harder than narrowing down your quince court? Actually getting the moves down. Between your primo stepping on your toes and getting your chambelan de honor to make it to practice on time, it’s all about coordination on and off the dance floor. Ruby enlists some help from Jessica when it comes to getting Olivia’s waltz to the ? level.

9. Going overboard for a quince party is so easy to do.

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Relatable ????????

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Since Ruby is crushing hard on Olivia, he tries to cheer her up for her quinceañera by ordering a giant banner of the state of Texas with drawings of cowboy boots and Frito pies on the side.

Typically one goes hard on a quince to win someone’s love.

CREDIT: Netflix

Olivia teases him that not *everyone* wears cowboy boots in the Lone Star state, but she gives him a hug after seeing all the effort he put into making her big night come true, despite not having her parents (who were deported) attend the party.

10. The shining quince moment everyone wishes they had.

CREDIT: Netflix

After months of waltzing in the garage or patio and hearing the same song over and over again, it all came down to showing off your steps in front of your friends and family. The look on Olivia’s face says it all—a quince dance is all about who is sharing in the moment with you.

It bring joy to everyone’s face because it’s adorable.

CREDIT: Netflix

Ruby is head over heels while dancing with her as her chambelan as Monse and Cesar are all smiles to see their friends so happy (side note: check out that waltz positioning.) Ruby was a great coach after all.

11. Abuela will always get too invested in her little telenovelas.

CREDIT: Netflix

One of the LOL-worthy moments of the series was when Abuela lit a candle in front of Monse, asking God to help Sylvia who had been poisoned by her husband. When Monse reacts in shock, Ruby rolls his eyes to tell her Sylvia is just a character from Abuela’s telenovela.


READ: Fans And Cast Members Are So Excited That ‘One Day At A Time’ Was Finally Picked Up For A Third Season

What was your favorite moment of the series? Let us know in the comments!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Social Media Shows Up To Help Abuela Living In Dire Straights While Taking Care Of Disabled Great-Grandson

Things That Matter

Social Media Shows Up To Help Abuela Living In Dire Straights While Taking Care Of Disabled Great-Grandson

Isabel Zamudio / Getty Images

All too often we hear stories involving social media that don’t paint the best picture of the digital platforms. From trolls coming for people or fights and arguments going public to sexual harassment and doxxing, social media has so often been used as a tool to do harm.

Thankfully, though, that’s not always the case.

Now we get to tell the story of how one viral video has helped rescue a 90-year-old abuelita and her disabled 17-year-old great-grandson from dire straights.

A 90-year-old abuela and her great-grandson will soon have a new home thanks to support from social media.

Last week, a video was posted to social media about the dangerous and unsanitary conditions a 90-year-old woman and her great-grandson were living in. The woman, from Veracruz, Mexico, lived with her great-grandson, Pedro Miguel, in a shack with tarps for walls and rusted-out tin roof.

The shack was furnished with not much more than a bed, which got wet every time it rained. López’s children have died, her grandchildren have abandoned her, and Pedro is basically the only family she has.

Since the video went viral, DIF Family Services agency met with López and her grandson to assess their health and announced both would get the medications they need. Meanwhile, Leonor López, has been housed in a shelter for the elderly and Pedro was placed in a state-run home where each will remain until authorities can find a home for her and Pedro.

The great-grandmother and her great-grandson are all the other has.

Credit: Isabel Zamudio / Getty Images

Leonora has cared for Pedro ever since he was abandoned by his mother shortly after birth. The 17-year-old does not speak and suffers from epileptic seizures.

Before being placed in supportive housing, each day Leonor would leave her house with a rope tied to the arm of her great-grandson as they went out to collect whatever they could to earn money. Some days they’d collect aluminum cans or cardboard to sell and some days they’d visit verdulerías or even private homes to dig through the garbage to find something to eat.

Every two months Leonora would receive her disability pension of $2,500 pesos (or about $125 USD), which she had to use to buy medicines for Pedro. She also told Milenio that she owes money from the last time Pedro got severely ill.

“When he gets sick I take him to the hospital or to the Red Cross, but they charge me a lot, because he has seizures. This time he got sick I took him but they charged me $6,400 [pesos or ($320 USD)] for three days of care.”

However, since being taken into assisted care, Pedro has also been enrolled to receive his own disability pension, which will definitely help address his medical costs.

Sadly, there misfortunes haven’t ended there.

In what is truly a disappointing story, often times when Leonor and Pedro have gone out to try and earn what money they can, they’re home is robbed of what little they have. According to their neighbor Rogelio, the community hasn’t come to their support – instead they steal from the family.

“I don’t see someone coming to help her, on the contrary, what little she has there they steal from her, even though she is alone in her house they steal what little she can gather; people take advantage,” Rogelio told Milenio.

Thankfully, the viral video has helped spur change for the family and they’ll soon have a proper home and the government benefits they’re both entitled to.

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This 103-Year-Old Abuela Got Her First Tattoo After Starting A Bucket List During The Pandemic

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This 103-Year-Old Abuela Got Her First Tattoo After Starting A Bucket List During The Pandemic

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It’s easy to believe that as time goes by and the older that we get that we have fewer opportunities to pursue our dreams. A grandmother from Michigan is setting out to prove us all wrong.

Dorothy Pollack is a 103-year-old grandmother who has been spending her time in the pandemic crossing off her bucket list.

The grandmother, who recently celebrated her birthday in June, has been spending the past few months in isolation at a nursing home in Muskegon, Michigan. Just like the rest of us, for Pollack, it’s been a struggle.

“Covid-19 had her in prison for months,” Teresa Zavitz-Jones, Pollack’s granddaughter told CNN. “The nurse in the home said she was horribly depressed and we needed to get her out. We couldn’t see her so we had no idea how she really was. She’s extremely hard of hearing so phone calls were not helpful.”

Weeks after being discharged from her nursing home Pollack decided that she was going to get a tattoo.

“It was pretty exciting because years ago my grandson wanted me to get one and I wouldn’t do it,” Pollack told CNN. “All of a sudden, I decided I would like to have one. And if I could, a frog. Because I like frogs.”

Last Friday, Pollack sat down for a session with a local tattoo artist and got her frog. “She took it like a champ. I didn’t even see her wince. Maybe she had half a wince once,” Ray Reasoner Jr, the artist behind her tattoo told CNN. “She was just so excited. It was an amazing experience. If someone over a century old tells you to do something for them you just gotta do it.” Reasoner, who works at A.W.O.L. Custom Tattooing in Muskegon, noted that Pollack is the oldest person that he has ever tattooed.

Pollack told CNN that she “absolutely loved” loved her tattoo and has been further inspired to cross more items off of her bucket list.

Onto more adventures for this one!

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