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DACA Renewal Applications Cost About $500, But Here’s Where You Can Get Help To Cover The Cost

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The Mission Asset Fund wants to make sure that DACA recipients whose DACA status expires before March 5, 2018 have the money they need to renew by Oct. 5, 2017. The average cost for a DACA renewal application is $495 and a renewal allows for DACA status to be valid for two years. Renewing now will allow some to have DACA until 2019. However, $495 out-of-pocket out of nowhere can be hard for many young people to come up with so MAF has raised funds to help 2,000 recipients renew their DACA. Just 24 hours after announcing the fund, 1,000 applications were submitted and in just two days $1 million were raised by funders and supporters.

“We quickly, in learning about the Trump administration’s decision to wind down DACA over the next 6 months, saw that there was an opportunity to help DREAMers still. Those are the ones who’s DACA status is going to expire within the next 6 months so they can apply for renewal and have an assurance of protection for the next two years,” José Quiñonez, the CEO of MAF says. “When we realized that we could step up and help those DACA recipients now, we didn’t think much of it. Within two days of issuing a call to our funders and supporters to help us with this fund, we were able to raise a little bit over $1 million to fully fund scholarships for up to 2,000 applicants. We are trying to fundraise for more money because there is a need out there.”

If you want to apply through MAF, visit lc4daca.org. MAF’s DACA renewal fund is a national fund.


READ: We Spoke To Some DACA Recipients About Their Uncertain Future. Here’s What They Said

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These Illustrations Tell The Stories Of DACA Recipients In Their Own Words

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These Illustrations Tell The Stories Of DACA Recipients In Their Own Words

Pablo Stanley

When the White House announced the rescission of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), Pablo Stanley, designer and co-founder at Carbon Health, felt the impact.

“It made me sad. It made it so hard to come to work and put on a happy face as though everything is okay,” says the Mexican-American artist.

Stanley immediately started brainstorming how he could use his talents to support those affected and take some action.

The illustrator decided to create portraits of DACA recipients, so they could share their stories in their own words. And that’s how Dreamer Stories was born.

“In just reading their stories and giving them a platform to tell their stories you realize that their experiences and everything that’s going on is so heavy,” says Stanley. “I feel honored to be a bit of a vehicle for sharing these stories with the world.”

While many DACA recipients are feeling fear, anxiety, and sadness, Stanley made sure to also share their joys and smiling faces. It’s his hope to create a portrait of their dreams and show them as the regular people they are, living their lives and not succumbing to the narrative the media tends to paint of them.

“They’re people who are alive and want to do more than cry on a corner,” says Stanley. “Many of them are activists themselves. The situation they’re in has given them this super power of empathy. When I asked them what their dream is many said to help other people that are in my situation.”

Estefanía works as a paralegal community advocate at the Equal Justice Center in Dallas.

CREDIT: Image credit: Pablo Stanley

“Despite struggles, limitations, and uncertainty a big achievement for me is that I am the first generation college student in my family. My family always told me that I couldn’t go to college because of my legal status. It took a huge toll on me but thanks to a 2001 state law in Texas, it would allow me, an undocumented student to pay in-state tuition as long as I proved I had lived in Texas for more than three years. I also graduated from my university debt-free through private scholarships and my parent’s sacrifices! Today, thanks to DACA I have a full-time job, I bought my first car, I got my driver’s license, and I was able to travel to Italy through advanced parole for educational purposes during my undergrad year. And now, I plan on continuing my education by going to law school and becoming an immigration lawyer.”

Read her full story here.

Gibrán works full-time in retail while also going to school.

CREDIT: Image credit: Pablo Stanley

As far as his dream:

“I think learning English has been the primary challenge for me, my friends say it’s great but I feel I can still improve.”

Read more here.

Alonso was born in Peru and emigrated to the U.S. when he was 11.

CREDIT: Image credit: Pablo Stanley

“Growing up undocumented in Utah truly shaped me into the person I am today. My experiences growing up in the margins of society inform the work I do, and the work I seek to continue doing in this life. I am passionate about working with undocumented students and families and strive to share all my knowledge and experiences with the undocumented community as well as the community as a whole.”

Read the rest of his story here.

Nayeli came to the U.S. when she was six and will graduate in December from college with a B.S. in web application development and a minor in marketing.

CREDIT: Image credit: Pablo Stanley

“My first dream is to create or take part in a business that provides change and opportunities for other cultural groups. My second dream is to contribute to the breaking down of the digital divide by teaching minority groups how to use technology to help improve their business or everyday lives.

My final and maybe my greatest dream is to be able to support my parents financially so that they can finally retire. They have sacrificed their lives and time so that I could have a better future, and I only wish to be able to repay that back.”

Here is the rest of Nayeli’s story.

To read more, go to DreamerStories.com.


READ: There Are Many Ways To Help DACAmented People. Here Are A Few.

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