Things That Matter

Mexico Is Selling Off Jewelry And Property Seized From Narcos To Build Necessary Roads

Close to 2,000 of pieces of jewelry were auctioned off this past Sunday by the Mexican government. From gold watches to bullet-shaped pendants encrusted with diamonds, the collection is a special set of items that have a place in Mexico’s dark criminal history. This is due to the items once belonging to Mexican drug lords and other sought after criminals. Hundreds of people came from all over the country seeking these exclusive and hallowed items that once belonged to the whos-who of Mexico’s narco world.

The auction is a chance to show the new government’s transparency and also support a good cause. the money from the auction will help fund building roads in western Mexico. 

Credit: @univ_inenglish / Twitter

This past weekend was the third such auction organized by the government, which has announced that the fourth one will sell off land and cash confiscated from drug dealers. The fundraising goal for the auction was 21.8 million pesos, about 1.14 million U.S. dollars, according to the AP. Proceeds from the auctions will be used to repair roadwork near the border between Michoacán and Colima.

Mexico’s austerity-minded President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who took office last December, is behind the auction. These jewelry sell-offs have been taking place outside Los Pinos, a mansion that was the former residence of the Mexican president. One of López Obrador’s first orders was making the estate in the capital’s Chapultepec Park into a cultural center designated to the open public.

Back in April, López Obrador announced his “Robin Hood” institute, a government agency that would return wealth seized from corrupt politicians and gangsters back to the people. 

“Let’s quickly return everything to the people that’s been stolen,” he said then at a news conference announcing the bill.

While many of the items are high in value, government officials have so far failed to meet some of their fundraising goals. 

Credit: @ruptly / Twitter

The System of Administrative Allocation of Assets (SAE), who is heading the auctions, is expected to host it’s fourth event in the coming weeks. But so far, exceptions have yet to be met in regards to their 21.8 million-peso minimum goal set by SAE head Ricardo Rodríguez.

The SAE has so far raised 10.3 million pesos ($540,000 USD), which is far short of its goal. This past weekend, the government expected between 250 and 350 people to take part in the auction but only 70 signed up to participate. Many of starting prices set forth by the government have yet to matched and buyers have been weary bidding on higher prices items. 

The upcoming auction will feature the properties allegedly confiscated from human trafficking activist Rosi Orozco and accused drug trafficker Xen Li Yegon.

Jewelry items bidding prices range from $655 to $155,000. These high prices are due to the one-of-a-kind nature of the jewelry collection.

Credit: @SAE_Mex / Twitter

One of the biggest draws to the auctions have been people’s curiosity for the narco treasures. Thousands of people have visited Los Pinos just to have a look at the jewelry collection. Felipe Palma, who came to auction with his family Sunday, was one of those curious onlookers. 

“They had some very strange things made,” Palma told the AP. “I imagine the guy that had that type of jewelry made was one of the bosses.”

The most expensive piece of jewelry that is listed is a men’s Piaget watch, valued at $155,000. The watch features an 18 karat, white gold timepiece that features 49 baguette-cut diamonds and an additional 160 baguette-cut diamonds on its side. 

While some of the items are high in value, many of the items that aren’t sought after are often purchased to be melted down to be sold again. Jorge Camacho, who was winning bidder on a Cartier watch and other assorted gold items, will be one of those trying to cash in by selling the items at a secondhand shop.

“There’s a market for everything,” Camacho told the AP. 

READ: Mexican President Lopez Obrador Is Bringing Sweeping Budget Cuts Causing Some Concerns

A 25-Year-Old Woman Was Murdered And Skinned, Then Mexican Newspapers Published Photos Of Her Body

Things That Matter

A 25-Year-Old Woman Was Murdered And Skinned, Then Mexican Newspapers Published Photos Of Her Body

SkyNews/ Twitter

In Mexico, the recent brutal mutilation and slaying of a 25-year-old woman are spurning conversations about the country’s efforts to prevent femicide and laws that protect victims from the media.

On Sunday, Mexican authorities revealed that they had discovered the body of Ingrid Escamilla.

According to reports, Escamilla was found lifeless with her body skinned and many of her organs missing. At the scene, a 46-year-old man was also discovered alive. His body was covered in bloodstains and he was arrested.

As of this story wasn’t troubling enough, local tabloids and websites managed to bring more tragedy to the victim and her family by splashing leaked graphic photos and videos of the victim’s body. In a terribly crafted headline, one paper by the name of Pasala printed the photos on its front page with the headline “It was Cupid’s fault.” The headline is a reference to the fact that the man found at the scene was Escamilla’s husband.

According to leaked video footage from the arrest scene, Escamilla’s husband admitted to stabbing his wife after a heated argument in which she threatened to kill him. He then claimed to have skinned her body to eliminate evidence.

Mexic City’s mayor, Claudia Sheinbaum, revealed that prosecutors will demand the maximum sentence against the alleged perpetrator.

“Femicide is an absolutely condemnable crime. It is appalling when hatred reaches extremes like in the case of Ingrid Escamilla,” Sheinbaum wrote in a tweet according to CNN. According to reports, Mexico broke records in 2018 when its homicide record reached over 33,000 people that year.

The publication of Escamilla’s mutilated body has sparked discussions regarding the way in which reports about violence against women are handled.

Women’s rights organizations have lambasted the papers that originally published photos of Escamilla’s body and Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador also expressed criticism of the media’s response to the brutal slaying.

In a press conference on Thursday, President López Obrador expressed his determination to find and punish anyone responsible for the image leaks. “This is a crime, that needs to be punished, whoever it is,” he stated.

‘Narcos: Mexico’ Season 2 Picks Up Where We Left Off With Félix Gallardo And The Guadalajara Cartel

Entertainment

‘Narcos: Mexico’ Season 2 Picks Up Where We Left Off With Félix Gallardo And The Guadalajara Cartel

Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo is known as the padrino of Mexican narcotrafficking. As drug authorities were operating farther and tougher throughout Florida, Colombian drug cartels began to use Mexico to move their drugs. Félix Gallardo capitalized on this change in the drug trade and created a drug trafficking empire in Mexico.

Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo was the leader of the Guadalajara Cartel.

The Guadalajara Cartel was established in the 1980s and was one of the first cartels in Mexico to operate with the Colombian cartels. The Guadalajara Cartel flourished in the cocaine trade, though their crimes extend to murder, money laundering, torture, arms trading, and extortion.

One thing that set the Guadalajara Cartel apart was that the organization took a 50 percent cut of cocaine the smuggled into Mexico from Colombia. The cartel knew the value of the cocaine and they used the drugs they received from Colombia to beef up their criminal empire in Mexico.

At its peak, the Guadalajara Cartel was operating in numerous territories across the country. The cartel was operating in Tijuana, Juarez, Sinaloa, Jalisco, and Sonora.

“Narcos: Mexico” Season 2 is picking up where the first season left off. The

The Guadalajara Cartel was a force to be reckoned with in the 1980s. The cartel’s power was short-lived, however. The crime organization was established in 1980 and eventually fell apart by 1989.

Yet, the first major downfall for the cartel was the murder of undercover DEA agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena. The agent, who managed to infiltrate deep into the cartel, led an operation in 1984 to bust a 2,500-acre marijuana plantation in Chihuahua, Mexico called “Rancho Búfalo.”

The following year, Félix Gallardo ordered the kidnapping of Camarena and tortured the agent for 30 hours before he was killed. The following year, two of Félix Gallardo’s closet companions were arrested for the murder.

After keeping a low profile for years, Félix Gallardo moved with his family to Guadalajara City in 1987. He lived in peace until he was arrested by authorities on April 8, 1989, and charged with the murder and several other crimes connected to the cartel by both the Mexican and U.S. governments.

There is even a narcocorrido believed to be about the drug lord.

Los Tigres Del Norte released an album called “Jefe de Jefes” and the titular song is believed to be inspired by Félix Gallardo. The album, released in 1997, became the group’s first No. 1 album on the Billboard Top Latin Albums chart.

Fans are very excited to see the next season of “Narcos: Mexico

Credit: @MUNECA333 / Twitter

The “Narcos” series has captured the fascination of Netflix’s audience. At first, the show was in Colombia following the rise and fall of notorious drug lord Pablo Escobar. “Narcos: Mexico” is the continuation of that story with the narcotrafficking in Mexico.

Make sure you check out Netflix on Feb. 13 for the new series of “Narcos: Mexico.”

Credit: @SabrynaStevens / Twitter

Who else is excited to finally see this new season?

You can watch the full trailer for the show below!

READ: The Trailer For ‘Narcos: Mexico’ Season 2 Is Here And It Is Everything Fans Were Hoping For