Things That Matter

Latinos Are Less Likely To Seek Medical Help, This Health App In Spanish Could Help

The likelihood of Latinos going to see a doctor for a check up or even when symptoms appear is pretty low. There are several things that prevent Latinos from seeking medical attention like a lack of health insurance, and recently a fear of immigration officials. Some Latinos prefer to forego the doctor and hope things work out for the better. There are a lot of jokes that Latinos prefer home remedies and Vaporu. Now, one comapny is trying to change that for the better.

Ada Health is an artificial intelligence health platform that is already helping millions of people understand their health.

CREDIT: Courtesy Ada Health

Now, the company is going to focus on getting Latinos to the doctor. A Healthy Americas Survey released in 2017 found that out of all minority groups, Latinos were less likely to seek out medical care. An estimated 55 percent of Latinos go to the doctor for health screenings or preventive care.

Ada Health is helping Latinos make medical care a reality by removing obstacles, like the Spanish-language barrier.

CREDIT: Unsplash

According to the United States Census Bureau, out of the 50 million Spanish speakers in the country, about 17 million of them speak English less than “very well.” For many, it’s usually the children that serve as their parents translator.

Ada is launching a new Spanish language platform to help Latinos better assess their health concerns.

CREDIT: Courtesy Ada Health

Ada Health is not a replacement for seeking professional medical help from a doctor. However, it is a useful resource to monitor symptoms and get alerted as to whether or not you need to seek medical attention.

Dr. Claire Novorol, the co-founder and Chief Medical Officer of Ada Health and a former pediatrician, said that Ada is designed to help users feel like they’re having a conversation with a friendly health guide.

Here’s how the app works:

CREDIT: Courtesy Ada Health

“The app takes you through a series of questions to understand your past medical history, risk factors and asks you about your current symptoms. Then, Ada generates a detailed health assessment that suggests possible conditions and the likelihood of each condition,” Dr. Novorol said. “Ada explores your health and symptoms in detail, personalizing follow up questions to your particular situation and drawing upon an enormous medical knowledge base to suggest possible causes.”

The medical app can also help navigate psychological symptoms and ailments.

CREDIT: Courtesy Ada Health

There is still a stigma surrounding mental health within the Latino community. It is something our community is started to talk about through op culture and media. Ada Health is offering a chance to learn a little more about your mental health.

“It’s critical that the healthcare community continues to work together to understand and embrace new solutions that empower individuals and improve their ability to access the personalized and high-quality care they need,” Dr. Novorol said. “Behind Ada is proprietary artificial intelligence technology and a medical knowledge base that covers thousands of conditions including psychological symptoms and cases, curated by our team of medical experts.”

Because Latinos have a slew of holistic remedies, Ada is planning on incorporating that approach in the future.

“Right now, the app serves as the first line of defense intended to help a patient navigate to the appropriate care, which may include holistic care,” Dr. Novorol said. “At this stage, the app does not recommend specific holistic healthcare providers, but this is something that’s on the horizon for Ada.”

As we noted the app should not replace professional medical help. The app is meant to be provide “timely access to credible health information, a safe and confidential outlet for individuals to address their initial concerns, and empower them to seek the appropriate guidance.”


READ: Doctors Are Calling On Immigration Officials To Respect Sensitive Sites And Allow Undocumented Immigrants To Get Medical Attention

Do you think you or your parents would use this app? Let us know by sharing this story and commenting below!

More Latinos Are Struggling With Epilepsy Than You Might Think

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More Latinos Are Struggling With Epilepsy Than You Might Think

camilacoelho / Instagram

Epilepsy is a disorder that is characterized by unprovoked seizures that are not tied to alcohol withdrawal or low blood sugar. The disorder can be genetic or a result of a traumatic brain injury. Hundreds of thousands of Latinos in the U.S. are diagnosed with epilepsy and there is more we can do as a community to help those with the disorder.

There are around 400,000 Latinos who are living with epilepsy.

Camila Coelho, a Brazilian fashion influencer and blogger, recently shared her own journey living with epilepsy. In an interview with PEOPLE, Coelho opened up about being diagnosed with epilepsy since she was 9 years old.

“My mother said to me, ‘Camila, you are a normal child. You will live your normal life. There’s nothing you can’t do,'” Coelho told the magazine.

Coelho is using her platform to educate people about epilepsy.

“I have EPILEPSY and I didn’t let it stop me from achieving my dreams 🙏🏻 💜 I am happy to announce that I am not only an @epilepsyfdn Ambassador, but now also a member of the BOARD,” Coelho shared on Instagram. “As someone who lived with epilepsy since the age of 9, I feel honored and excited to join this amazing team, and help change and save lives of those with epilepsy around the world, who may feel different and alone like I once did!! (I shared more on my stories)! #epilepsyawareness

The Epilepsy Foundation did a study to find out the cultural awareness around epilepsy.

According to the Epilepsy Foundation, there is still a perception of fear and misunderstanding around epilepsy. The misunderstandings around epilepsy make diagnosing and treating the disorder a challenge.

There are different therapies and treatments for epilepsy. The Epilepsy lists some of those therapies as:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: This form of therapy started in the 1960s and has been successful in helping people to overcome some of their symptoms. This form of therapy is based on the belief that the thoughts are responsible for guiding behavior. The therapy helps to reduce feelings of anxiety and depression that might lead to seizures.

Educational Intervention: Studies have found that people being diagnosed early and supported have a better time adjusting to the diagnosis. The younger someone can learn about epilepsy and how it can be managed with appropriate therapy, the better they can adjust.

Relaxation Therapies: The Epilepsy Foundation claims that massage, acupuncture, progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, and deep breathing therapies could be beneficial for people living with epilepsy.

Make sure to consult with your doctor before making any changes to your existing treatment plans.

You can learn more about epilepsy and how you can help by going to the Epilepsy Foundation website.

READ: Salice Rose Gave Her Family A Vulnerable Look At Her Mental Health Struggles: “I Was Asking For Help”

Parents Angered After Priest Refuses To Offer Autistic Son First Communion

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Parents Angered After Priest Refuses To Offer Autistic Son First Communion

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First Communion is a very important moment in any Catholic child’s life. The family gets together to watch the little ones walk down the church aisles in white and partake in the sacrament for the first time. For one family, however, a priest has taken that moment away from them because their child is autistic.

The LaCugna family is upset that their autistic son was denied his First Communion.

Credit: Jimmy LaCugna / Facebook

Jimmy LaCugna took to Facebook to share his disappointment with his church for denying his special needs son his First Communion. First Communion is one of the most important moments in a young Catholics life and the family feels like it has been taken away from them.

“They said there is no way he can make his Communion. He doesn’t understand what the Holy Communion is about,” Nicole LaCugna told News 12 New Jersey. “Nowhere in the Bible does it ever show discrimination of anybody.”

Since the Facebook post by Jimmy, the church tried to change course then deleted their reversal from Facebook.

Credit: Jimmy LaCugna / Facebook

Allegedly, the church released a statement that painted the LaCugna family as being dishonest about the situation. However, it was deleted from their Facebook page without warning.

The post initially stated that “new information has come to light” stating that children with intellectual and cognitive disabilities “should be presumed to have an inner spiritual relationship with God.”

“My heart shattered,” Nicole told the New York Post. “My first thought was, how do you take a child who was one of God’s children and say that he is not good enough, basically, to be making the sacrament?”

At the center of the controversy is the fact that Rev. John Bambrick made the decision but hasn’t addressed the family personally.

Credit: Facebook

In a statement posted to the church’s website, Rev. Bambrick blames the controversy on a breakdown of communication.

“With the guidance and support of Bishop David O’Connell, we were able to discern a way for the child to receive First Holy Communion without any delay,” Rev Bambrick stated. “We have made the family aware of this development and hope to be able to meet with them to discuss it. Their child continues to be welcome in our program, and will be able to receive First Holy Communion this year.”

Catholic parishioners have been shocked and dismayed by this church’s handling of a child with special needs.

Credit: @TaylorCVaughn / Twitter

The decision to withhold the child’s First Communion for mental or health issues isn’t the first time. A quick Google search brings back several cases of children being denied their First Communion because of mental or health issues.

READ: 21 Things Latinos From Catholic Families Know To Be True