Things That Matter

Comadre A Comadre: Biden Invites Latina ‘Comadres’ To Join The Political Movement And Vote

The Latino community is a core part of the American story and it’s about time that our community is represented at all levels of government. As Latinos, we have endured generations of hate, racism, and cruel immigration policies that have left our communities wounded and in fear.

Although both Joe Biden and Donald Trump are trying to court the Latino vote to help push them over the finish line come November’s election, only Joe Biden has demonstrated his willingness to work alongside leading Latino voices.

To demonstrate that commitment, the Biden campaign has launched several grassroots movements meant to help build momentum and trust among the Latino community.

The Biden campaign has helped launch Comadre A Comadre, a campaign to bring together the Latino community in support of Democratic candidates.

Comadre A ComadrePosted by We are mitú on Wednesday, September 23, 2020

Women for Biden and Todos con Biden recently launched Comadre a Comadre. The nationwide initiative encourages Latinas to engage in politics and mobilize the vote for the 2020 election.

 “We know that the pathway to the White House is through the Latino community, and we know Latinas are the heart of our communities,” said Rep García. “It’s important that all of us–whether it’s our tía, our abuela, our comadre, our friend, our sister, our girlfriend–tell each other why this race is so important.”

Laura Jiménez, Latino Engagement Director for the Biden campaign explains: “Las comadres means a group of girlfriends, sisters, or close friends, and as we launch Comadre a Comadre, we want to bring the Latinas together and empower them to vote. There are so many of us who support Joe Biden and Kamala Harris, and we want to inspire a sense of unity, closeness, and strength as we work to get them elected.”

That unity, closeness, and strength is what they hope to achieve with this initiative, bringing Latinas together to mobilize for leadership that supports our community. Both Congresswomen are trailblazers in their own right: Mucarsel-Powell is the first Ecuadorian-American and South American immigrant member of Congress, while Garcia in one of the first Latinas to represent Texas.

The launch event was held online and featured leading Latina voices.

Launched last week, the debut event featured Congresswomen Debbie Mucarsel-Powell and Sylvia Garcia, who guided a conversation on the importance of the Latinx vote in battleground states like Florida. They were joined by Floridian community leaders Sonia Succar Ferré and Daniela Ferrera–two Latinas who are ready to get Biden and Harris elected.

Comadres love the chisme, and this time, the chisme is political. Throughout the hour-long conversation, they touched on some of the issues that disproportionately affect Latinx communities.

When asked about her hopes for Florida’s future, Sonia mentioned her concern about the mishandling of the COVID-19 crisis and the disregard for climate change. “Climate is something that we recognize is at our doorstep…we are a coastal community surrounded by water at all sides, and I want a leader and an administration that takes science, health data, and information seriously.”

“I want to help mobilize my fellow Puerto Ricans to realize that our future, our children’s future, and our environment are dependent on what we can do and how we can help deliver a win for Vice president Biden and Senator Harris,” shared Sonia.

Latinos will make up the largest racial minority in the electorate this year and candidates are working hard to get the vote.

For the first time in history, Latinos will be the largest minority in the electorate, with more than 32 million Latinos eligible to vote nationwide in the 2020 election. Comadre a Comadre is meant to highlight Latinas’ political power and to show what’s at stake for our community in this election.

Women are more likely to vote than men and Latinas are even more key to engaging our community since we tend to encourage our friends and family to vote as well. But don’t worry if you missed this kick off event. Comadre a Comadre has a full calendar of events, encouraging participants to join bilingual phone banks organized by the Biden campaign. For more information, check out their website here.

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9 LGBTQ+ Latinas Making The World A Better Place Through Representation

Culture

9 LGBTQ+ Latinas Making The World A Better Place Through Representation

stephaniebeatriz / lidopimienta / Instagram

Women are a driving force for change. It has been proven time and time again in history. LGBTQ+ Latinas are part of this tradition whether it is in activism, media, or representation in comic books. Here are 9 LGBTQ+ Latinas who are doing their part to make the world a better place.

Stephanie Beatriz

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Stephanie Beatriz is known for her character Rosa on “Brooklyn Nine-Nine.” The actress wanted to create a character that someone like her could relate to and she made it happen. Rosa came out in the show as a bisexual Latina and it gave Beatriz a chance to play a character that reflects her real identity. For the first time, bisexual Latinas have someone on television that speaks to a very real and important identity.

Tessa Thompson

Tessa Thompson publicly came out of the closet as bisexual in 2018. The actress revealed her relationship with musician Janelle Monáe and fans were there to support her. Thompson made a real splash in the Marvel Cinematic Universe when she portrayed Valkyrie in “Thor: Ragnarok.” She will be slaying again as Valkrie in “Thor: Love and Thunder.”

Bamby Salcedo

Bamby Salcedo is unapologetically trans and fighting for trans lives and rights. Salcedo founded the TransLatin@ Coalition to create a network for trans Latinas to connect and help each other thrive. Salcedo is often in protests for trans lives including against Pete Buttigieg during a CNN/HRC Town Hall.

Victoria Cruz

Victoria Cruz is a gatekeeper of LGBTQ+ history. The indigenous trans woman was there for the start of the Gay Liberation movement in 1969. Cruz has been a leader in the fight for LGBTQ+ rights. Cruz has continued to her fight for trans rights even in the face of transphobia in the LGBTQ+ community. As the LGBTQ+ community tends for forget its history, Cruz is here to remind them of how important the trans community is in gaing LGBTQ+ rights.

Carmen Carrera

Carmen Carrera first came into everyone’s home as a contestant on “RuPaul’s Drag Race.” This was before she started her transition. Since embarking on her transition journey, Carrera has had a very successful career as a supermodel, became a stepmother, and has been championing trans rights in the U.S. and Peru. The activist has spent years breaking down stereotypes about trans people wherever she goes.

Salice Rose

Salice Rose is a major name in social media. With more than 16 million followers on TikTok, Rose has created a place for people to feel safe and included. Using comedy and her spirituality, Rose has been able to tackle important issues, like coming out.

Gabby Rivera

Gabby Rivera was tapped to write for the America Chavez comic book in a move by Marvel that was widely celebrated. Rivera was able to give American Chavez, a queer Latin superhero, an authentic voice. Rivera is also the author of “Juliet Takes A Breaths.’ The young adult novel follows a Puerto Rican girl who comes out to her family right before going to an internship on the other side of the country.

Martine Gutierrez

Martine Gutierrez is a famed photographer and artist that has displayed work around the world. The art critic Barbara Calderon wrote about Gutierrez’s identity that has been an elusive yet broad identity. Calderon spoke of terms used to identify oneself yet none seemed to accurately describe who Gutierrez is.

Lido Pimienta

Lido Pimienta is an Afro-indigenous Colombian Canadian musician who is transforming Latin music, especially the scene with her sexuality. The queer musician is unapologetic about her identity for the sake of visibility. Pimienta feels a need to stay ver visible to change the long-running history of no queer visibility in media.

READ: Here Are Some Queer Films And Shows To Watch To Start Pride Off Right

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Turns Out The First Owner Of Beverly Hills Was An Impressive Afro-Mexican Woman

Fierce

Turns Out The First Owner Of Beverly Hills Was An Impressive Afro-Mexican Woman

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Beverly Hills, one of the most well-known destinations in the country and world has long been a thriving and prime area for real-estate. Long before it was colonized by the Spanish, and was largely populated by rich white elites, the Indigenous people of California known as the Tongva, thrived there.

Hundreds of years later, in the 1830s, when the area was colonized, Maria Rita Valdez Villa, the granddaughter of Spanish colonists Luis and Maria Quintero and the great-granddaughter of an African slave was granted the original 4,500-acre of Beverly Hills, then known as El Rancho Rodeo de las Aguas.

Yes, as it turns out the foremother of Beverly Hills was a Black Latina!

During her ownership, Maria Rita oversaw cattle ranching and farming.

According to LA Magazine, Rita “was well known for holding a yearly celebratory rodeo under a famous eucalyptus tree at what is now Pico and Robertson boulevards.”

Sadly, after working the land for so much time, three Indigenous Californian outlaws attacked the ranch in 1852. The attack led to a shootout amongst “a grove of walnut trees at what is now Benedict Canyon and Chevy Chase drives” and eventually in 1854 Maria Rita decided to sell the area to investors Henry Hancock and Benjamin D. Wilson for $4,000.

Perhaps there’s a chance for justice for Maria Rita in the end.

Recently, Los Angeles County officials revealed that they were contemplating returning a beachfront property that was seized from a Black family nearly a century ago.

According to the Guardian, Manhattan Beach used “eminent domain” in 1924 to force Willa and Charles Bruce, the city’s first Black landowners, of the land where they lived. “The Bruces also ran a resort for Black families during a time when beaches in the strand were segregated,” explained the Guardian in a recent report. “Part of the land was developed into a city park. It is now owned by Los Angeles county and houses lifeguard headquarters and a training center.”

Manhattan Beach county Supervisor Janice Hahn announced that she was looking into ways to restore justice for Bruce family. Options include delivering the land back to the family, paying for losses, or potentially leasing the property from them

“I wanted the county of Los Angeles to be a part of righting this terrible wrong,” Hahn explained in a recent interview with KABC-TV.

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