Things That Matter

Julio Cesar Chavez Lashes Out At Mexican Police, Distraught Over His Brother’s Murder

Instagram/@omarchavezzbu/YouTube

On Sunday, the older brother of legendary Mexican boxer Julio César Chávez was shot and killed at his home in Culiacán, Mexico. According to the Associated Press, Rafael Chávez González was at his home when two men entered through the back door and demanded money from him. Rafael was fatally shot after he resisted the intruders, according to Sinaloa state prosecutor Juan José Ríos.

Credit: NoroesteTV / YouTube

Ríos said that the culprits were given some money but wanted more. Rafael didn’t give in as easily, and that’s when he was shot. Rafael was killed in front of his family. Roberto Chávez González, Julio César’s brother, confirmed the story to authorities on Monday.

While no suspects have been arrested, Ríos said that on the same night of the fatal robbery, 10 armed men had kidnapped an “undetermined number of people” at a restaurant in Culiacán. It’s not clear if these two incidents are related.

Julio César Chávez was extremely emotional while speaking to reporters about his brother’s murder.

Credit: El MEXICANO / YouTube

The 54-year-old said he couldn’t believe his brother was gone. In the video above, Julio César says it’s been incredibly difficult, especially for his mother, who is in a fragile state. Contrary to the reports from the Associated Press, Julio César says there were three men involved in the robbery, not two.

A reporter asked him if family members who witnessed the shooting could identify the killers. He responded by saying that none of them could ID them.

“[The police] could not identify any of them, but we have clues and I’m not going to let them know [by telling the media], but it’s all very advanced, thank God, and this is not going to go unpunished, I swear — because unfortunately there has been a lack of security in Culiacán and not just in Culiacán… this is happening throughout the Mexican Republic and I think we must unite, all Mexicans, to fight against this, to support each other because it seems that there is no government,” Julio César said. “Today it was my brother, maybe tomorrow it will be me.”

Julio César said the violence in Mexico is only getting worse, adding that he’s very angry because he has also been threatened.

“I asked for help and support from the authorities in Tijuana,” Julio César said. “[Pero] se han hecho pendejos,” he added. Julio César said that the FBI has informed him that people wanted to kidnap him and his daughter. He said he contacted authorities in Baja California, but added that high-ranking officials have not responded to his pleas. He believes police are probably waiting for something to happen to him, but said, “What’s the point then? It’ll be too late.”

Julio César said he never considered leaving Culiacán despite the violence and threats against him and his family because that’s where he has always lived. But now, he may reconsider. He also lamented the fact that his brother had to die so tragically after overcoming drug problems:

“My brother was dedicated to helping people who have problems with alcohol and drugs or any type of addiction. Thanks to my recovery he could also recover, and the saddest thing is that he lost his life for some drug addicts.”

Julio César Chávez Jr. retweeted this message from WBC Boxing President Mauricio Sulaiman:

Omar Chávez, Julio César’s younger son, posted this heartbreaking message.


“It’s unbelievable that my uncle was assaulted because he did not want to give them the money, so they killed him. It’s unbelieveable how people can take the life of someone who has children and a mother. They have no idea the pain and damage they have inflicted so easily. I hope and wait for justice.” He also tagged two government officials, including the governor of Culiacán.

“I will miss you,” added Omar Chávez.

Te voy a extrañar pues si así es aunque no quieras aya nos vemos pronto tío D.E.P tío borrego me mataste en el primero ??

A post shared by Omar Alonso Chavez Carrasco (@omarchavezzbu) on

READ: JC Chávez On Drugs, Narcos And Suicide

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Mexican Cartels Are Turning To Avocados And Innocent People Are Falling Victim To Extreme Violence

Things That Matter

Mexican Cartels Are Turning To Avocados And Innocent People Are Falling Victim To Extreme Violence

Cártel Jalisco Nueva Generación en el Estado de México #Edomex

When someone mentions Mexican cartels, we immediately think of drug trafficking. It’s inevitable – especially after the strict diet of cop shows we’ve ingested over the years. But what if we told you that there’s something else that’s probably just as valuable to the Mexican cartels? Something that, in their minds, justified the killing of 19 people last week. Something like … avocados?

Guacamole is good, but not that good.

Instagram / @duascontrauma

Sure, when you said to your amigas the other day that you’d kill for some good guac, you probably weren’t thinking on this scale. Thursday morning saw the residents of Mexico’s Uruapan awaken to the aftermath of a massacre. Nine semi-naked bodies had been strung across an overpass. Another seven bodies, which had suffered a combination of dismemberment and decapitation, were discovered underneath a nearby pedestrian bridge. And, three other bodies were unceremoniously piled on the side of the road. All of the victims were found with gunshot wounds.

The city of Uruapan is ground zero for this new outbreak of violence.

Instagram / @viviana.falcon1

The Jalisco New Generation Cartel (CJNG) took credit for the grisly scene by hanging a banner on the bridge where the bodies were found, warning locals of a similar fate, should they think about helping the gang’s rivals. “Kind people, go on with your routine. Be patriotic, and kill a Viagra,” the banner read. And no – they weren’t talking about a certain pleasure enhancer. One of the CJNG’s most notorious rivals are the Viagras gang.

But where do the avocados come into the story?

Instagram / @avocado.aj

While some authorities have connected the gruesome killings to the region’s drug trade, one International Crisis Group researcher, Falko Ernst, has suggested that there may be more to it. “The big magnet here is avocados,” said Ernst in an interview with the Guardian. The murders were intended to intimidate not only Mexican authorities, but also rival gangs and their families. The aim was to discourage their involvement in both the drugs and avocado trade.

With soaring prices, avocados have become big business in Mexico.

Instagram / @hassdiamond

It’s understandable why anyone would want a piece of the avocado pie, so to speak. It’s the lifeblood of Latinos and avocado-toast toting millennials worldwide, which makes it big business. Mexico itself produces 45 percent of the world’s avocados. The state of Michoacán, where Uruapan can be found, is where most of the avocados within Mexico are produced. In fact, Michoacán’s avocado industry is worth about $1.5 billion. Chances are its value is only going to increase, since the world’s supply of avocados is currently at a low.

This is wild! How are the locals coping?

Instagram / @viajaxmichoacan

At this point in time, there are three main groups struggling for control of the city of Uruapan. These are the Knight Templar cartel, Los Viagras, and of course, the CJNG. This means that it can be risky for locals to work in the industry, who may get caught in the crossfire between the gangs as they battle it out for control of the avocado supply. As many as four avocado trucks are stolen every day, presumably by the cartels operating in the region. It’s gotten so out of hand that the area’s avocado companies appealed to the gangs through an ad in a June edition of the local paper, saying, “It’s impossible to continue taking these losses … failing to stop the theft of these trucks will have an irreparable impact on the avocado industry.”

Locals are dealing with all sorts of violence, extortion, threats, and worse.

Instagram / @avocado.aj

Aside from stolen trucks and products, locals also have to contend with CJNG-linked extortion. A local tequila producer, Eduardo Pérez, closed his business in 2015, as he was unable to keep up with the cartel’s monthly payment demands. “They warned me that if I didn’t pay, then I’d be in trouble,” Perez said in an interview with VICE. That’s the reality of living in an area where gangs like the CJNG operate – and these recent murders have done nothing to quell any tensions in the area.

Brutal killing sprees like those that happened last week were designed to get as much attention as possible, and serve as a warning to anyone and everyone that the CJNG is unafraid of retaliating against people who would threaten their illicit activities. Let’s just keep our fingers crossed that there’s some relief for the locals, soon.

Latinos Are Some Of The Strongest And Best Boxers And These Athletes Prove It

Entertainment

Latinos Are Some Of The Strongest And Best Boxers And These Athletes Prove It

canelo / andy_destroyer13 / Instagram

Boxing is the one sport in which those individuals that come from an underprivileged background or have had to lace up the gloves to escape street violence can have their own rags to riches stories. Many of the greatest boxers of all time come from ethnic and cultural minorities, or from Global South regions such as Latin America. Today, world boxing is dominated by a handful of Latin American boxers and fighters of Latino origin in the United States. From junior flyweight all the way to heavyweight, Latino boxers are enjoying a dominance that translates into accomplished dreams and millions of dollars. Here are 13 established and upcoming fighters across most of the weight classes that are vanquishing their opposition and writing their names on the annals of global pugilism.

1. Saúl Canelo Álvarez
Weight class: middleweight

Credit: Canelo / Instagram

The current king of boxing in financial terms. No one has made more money after Floyd Mayweather retired from boxing a couple of years ago. The Mexican Canelo has just signed a $350 million dollar deal with the streaming service DAZN and will fight again on September 14, Mexican Independence weekend, in Las Vegas. His opponent is yet to be confirmed, but it seems it will not be Gennady Golovkin, but perhaps the world light-heavyweight champ Sergey Kovalev. If that is the case and Canelo defeats him, he will prove his worth against a much heavier and much more powerful puncher. By this point we are all surprised by the amazing things Canelo can accomplish in the ring.

2. Andy “Destroyer” Ruiz
Weight class: heavyweight

Credit: andy_destroyer13 / Instagram

This native of Imperial Valley became an elite boxer after soundly defeating British champ Anthony Joshua in a shocking fashion. No one, other than experts and insiders, would have predicted a KO win by Ruiz, whose flabby physique contrasted with the muscular Joshua. He will make millions in the rematch, which is rumored for September, and win or lose he will increase his popularity among Latinos the world over. Mexican-Americans can now claim a champ amongst them.

3. Juan Francisco “Gallo” Estrada
Weight class: super flyweight

Credit: vicenteruiz42 / Instagram

This Mexican veteran is a true master of the craft. He recently defeated the Thai dynamo Sor Rungvisai, who had defeated the amazing Nicaraguan Chocolatito Gonzalez. Estrada combines savvy counterpunching with exquisite lateral movements and is bound to become a top pound-for-pound star in the lower weight classes. 

4. Teofimo Lopez
Weight class: lightweight

Credit: teofimolopez / Instagram

This brutal puncher has quickly established himself as the top prospect in boxing. He is an American of Central American descent, and his fists have put him in line to challenge the pound-for-pound king, Ukranian Vassily Lomachenko. Only time will tell how far this bombastic pugilist will go, but he is must-watch TV and the diamante en bruto of powerful promoter Bob Arum. 

5. Zurdo Ramirez
Weight class: light heavyweight

Credit: zurdoramirez / Instagram

This powerful Mexican ex-champ recently moved up from super middleweight, where he enjoyed a great reign. He is ready to mingle with the big boys in the light heavyweight class. He is hungry and undefeated, a deadly combination. His persona is as ranchero as it comes, sombrero included, so he has captivated Latino audiences in the United States. 

6. Luis Panterita Nery
Weight class: bantamweight

Credit: luisnerynp / Instagram

This former champ is undefeated and fights in a category in which the indomitable Monster, Japanese fighter Inoue, reigns supreme. Nery, a native of Tijuana, reminds us of the great Erik Terrible Morales in his precision punching and big cojones. After losing his title on the scale he is ready for big things and making up for lost time. 

7. Rigoberto “El Chacal” Rigondeaux
Category: super bantamweight

Credit: boxeomundialcom / Instagram

This Cuban fighter is one of the best amateurs in history and has only one defeat in his record. He has been around for a while, but because of his exquisite defensive skills he is sometimes deemed as a boring fighter. In his latest fight, however, he went toe-to-toe with Mexican Julio Ceja, which made for a more audience-friendly demonstration of the escuela cubana del boxeo

8. Elwin “Pulga” Soto
Weight class: junior flyweight

Credit: boxeomundialcom / Instagram

This Mexican just scored a huge upset by knowking out Puerto Rican raising star Angel Acosta. Mexico has given amazing fighters in this category (remember Humberto “Chiquita” Gonzalez?), and Soto could be the next in line to be a Hall of Famer. Even if his skills have to be polished a bit more, he possesses a fighting style reminiscent of the great punchers of the 1970s.

9. Vergil Ortiz Jr.
Weight class: welterweight

Credit: vergilortiz / Instagram

Some consider him the top prospect in boxing. He fights in an elite category that includes Errol Spence Jr. and Terrence Crawford, perhaps two of the best fighters in the world. Ortiz has just demolished every single opponent due to his precise body punching and fierceness. His motto: hard work. He takes nothing for granted and seems to be destined for greatness. Born in the United States, Ortiz is proud of his heritage and often wears the Mexican national colors, verde blanco colorado

10. Jaime Munguia
Weight class: super welterweight

Credit: jaimemunguiaoficial / Instagram

This young champ started making headlines in 2018, when he was mentioned as a possible opponent for Gennady Golovkin when the May 2018 fight against Canelo fell through. Munguia is an all-action fighter that, however, still needs some work on his defense. He will eventually fight Canelo or GGG and surely produce an unforgettable fight. The native of Tijuana signed with streaming DAZN, just like Canelo, so we are sure there are big plans in store for him. But, as we said, he has to work on his defense or a big puncher might take him.

11. King Ryan Garcia
Weight class: super featherweight

Credit: kingryang / Instagram

The Mexican-American golden boy has been touted as the successor of Oscar De la Hoya and Canelo: he is a charmer who is as galancito with the ladies as he is a killer in the ring. He possesses otherworldly speed and good instincts inside the ring. He is yet to be tested, though, which reveals the care that promoter Oscar De la Hoya has had in not rushing him into the elite circles just yet.  

12. David Benavidez
Weight class: super middleweight

Credit: benavidez300 / Instagram

This former super middleweight champ was stripped from his title in 2018 after testing positive for cocaine. He is back with a vengeance and after admitting his guilt on social media he is determined to get back what he lost out of his own fault. Only time will tell, but he has one of the fastest hands in the upper divisions. A fight against Zurdo Ramirez would be a barn burner, one of those Latino classics. He is a native of Phoenix, Arizona. 

13. Luis “King Kong” Ortiz
Weight class: heavyweight

Credit: nuthing_personal / Instagram

This gargantuan Cuban puncher was very close to becoming the champ when he had Deontay Wilder on the verge of a knockout. He eventually lost a few rounds later but will fight a rematch in September. If he pulls off the upset, and he very well might be given his technique and ring generalship, we will have two Latinos, him and Andy Ruiz, calling the shots in the holy grail of boxing: the heavyweight championship of the world.

READ: Andy Ruiz Jr. Might Be A New Boxing Champion But He Doesn’t Start Any Fight Without His Snickers

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