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In 2019, Give Your Business To These 20 Latino-Owned Companies To Keep The Community Strong

artelexia

Latino businesses are more prevalent than ever before. The community as a whole continues to change and evolve at a rapid pace. In the United States, you have entrepreneurship taking center stage. Latinas are driving the growth in this space and continue to do so every single day. Not all is positive for Latinos, though. There is still an uphill battle that each individual fights. Traditional routes to success are harder for Latino businesses, supporting them is pivotal for the continued success of Latino economic growth in the U.S.

La Corona Butron

Source: https://shoplatinx.com

La Corona Butron is a fantastic Latino-owned business that was started by Valerie and Isaac. This is a business owned by their family and aims to help your hair in a big way. They create a product by the name of La Corona Organic Hair Cream. It is a moisturizing hair cream that is second to none in the market.

The cream works on your hair, as well as on your skin.  All of the ingredients in the cream are completely natural, free of any additives or unnecessary chemicals.

The Pin Mix

Source: ThePinMix.com

The Pin Mix is a company that is based in Brooklyn, New York. They create pins that are just out of this world. The pins are unique in that they hit on everything. You could have a pin that touches on the latest in the pop culture space but also has a pin that hits on a favorite hobby you have. The company is extremely unique in what they do. Give their website a quick browse and you will see all of the amazing pins they create every day.

Sally Torres Vega

Source: SallyTorresVega.com

Sally Torres Vega is making waves in the fashion scene. The company made its debut with its slow fashion line back in the year 2008. Now, a full decade later, the company continues to go strong. Natural fibers and awe-inspiring silhouettes make the Sally Torres Vega fashion line extremely unique and attractive. It is a brand with a home base in Puerto Rico and helps you fill up your closet with awesomeness.

Cha Cha Covers

Source: https://cha-cha-covers-2.myshopify.com/

Cha Cha Covers is a Latino business that specializes in helping you make your nails look just splendid. What this company does is work to give you nail wraps. It is run by Ana Guajardo. Lots of pop culture gets a work into the nail wraps and there really is art for your nails that meets the needs of everyone.

Candy’s Kloset

Source: https://www.etsy.com/shop/CandysKloset

Jeanette Castro has made her mark as a Latino business that sells primarily on Etsy. She has over 6,500 sales since the shop made its appearance on the site. If you are of Latino heritage or just love the culture of Mexico, Central, and South America, her products are for you. She has a little bit of everything in her shop, including jewelry, pins, keychains and much more. The store typically has in excess of 250 items so check out the offerings.

Loquita Bath and Body

Source: https://www.loquitabath.com/

There is nothing like hopping into the bath and dropping in a lovely bath bomb. The brand creator is none other than Mira Perez. The company is a bath bomb group, specializing in bath bombs that are vegan. There are all sorts of inspiration in her products, including many of the current happenings in the pop culture scene.

Li’l Libros

Source: https://www.localfixture.com/products/lil-libros-the-life-of-la-vida-de-celia

Li’l Libros is for the soon-to-be parents out there. The goal of this site is to connect your new baby with any and all of the books you want. As soon to be parents, you go on the site to create a listing of books you desire for your baby. The list is then sent to friends and family for purchase. The bilingual books educate the babies about their heroes.

Sweet Llamita

Source: https://www.sweetllamita.com/

So many creations from this colorful Latino company. You may want to send something from them to someone as a get well wish or just to show they are top of mind. The greeting cards and other things the company creates will put a smile on the face of anyone.

Coyote Negro

Source: https://www.garmentory.com/sale/coyote-negro

Coyote Negro is a Latino business with designs by Melissa Hernandez. The jewelry line features shapes that are classic, to say the least. Many are made from recycled materials and feature geometry in the design.

Viva La Bonita

Source: https://vivalabonita.com/

Viva La Bonita is a company that screams Latino culture and creativity. They create some amazing tops as well as phone cases. It is all about letting the world know how you feel, what is on your mind. Their designs let you speak without saying a word. Wear their gear with pride.

Very That

Source: https://verythat.com/

You do not often see a company that specializes in stickers, but that is exactly what you have with this Latino business. Very That features totes, t-shirts, and more. They also have stickers for basically any idea or thought in your mind.

Artlexia

Source: https://artelexia.com/

Artlexia is a shop that has all sorts of fun stuff. They feature air fresheners, mugs, totes, pins, books, and everything in-between. They have different types of mole and much more.

Reina Rebelde

Source: https://reinarebelde.com/

Reina Rebelde has a passion for makeup and her shop speaks volumes for that. She creates makeup that has the goal of honoring, celebrating, and delivering boldness, passion. Her beauty brand aims to speak to its customers and Latino culture.

Annie Elainey

Source: https://affectconf.com/speakers/

Annie Elainey sells tees that are all about” The Future is Accessible.” She is a content creator diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome or EDS, impacting her connective tissues. She wants to include the disabled community and does so through her business, through her passion in what she creates. She sells shirts to bring a more inclusive future forward.

Hot Sundae

Source: https://www.instagram.com/p/BreYJexBonY/

Hot Sundae is all about pins and creates some pieces that will simply make you smile. Hoe Sundae has the goal of serving looks and has been doing it since 2013. As a Latina-owned business, it continues to make waves in Los Angeles.

Galaxy Vibrations

Source: https://galaxyvibrations.com/

Galaxy Vibrations is a company with lots of crystals. They make bracelets, pendants, and so much more. The crystal healing powers are always present on every one of their creations.

Born x Raised

Source: https://bornxraised.com/

Born x Raised is another Latino business that runs out of Los Angeles. The company features clothing that is socially conscious. They bring the indigenous heritage to the forefront, pushing the boundaries of the clothing industry.

Baetanical

Source: http://remezcla.com

Baetanical is from an artist by the name of James Barela. The creations in modern ceramics, combining the Latino culture with some amazing colors pop in each piece. Pots, vases, drinkware, and more, all available from this great artist.

Golden Ponies

Source: https://goldenponies.net/

Golden Ponies has an Etsy shop that is based in Guadalajara. Opening in the year 2019, the handmade shoes that come from Golden Ponies always raise eyebrows in a positive fashion. They also feature clothing, bags, and more. Everything they make is from materials of a vegan source.

Pinkness

Source: pinkness.co

Pinkness.co is a company that makes amazing oils. The market for essential oils continues to explode and this Latino business is making its mark in that space.


READ: This Entrepreneur Worked For Years To Sell Her Authentic Mexican Sauces To The World And It Paid Off

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Here's Why Roxana Dueñas, A Teacher In Boyle Heights, Became The Face Of The LA Teachers' Strike

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Here’s Why Roxana Dueñas, A Teacher In Boyle Heights, Became The Face Of The LA Teachers’ Strike

_day.len / ernestoyerena / Instagram

Roxana Dueñas remembers walking through the streets of Boyle Heights to get to school. She attended Garfield High School in East Los Angeles, which was the site of the 1968 walkouts. During the 1968 walkouts, Chicano students protested unequal treatment. Today, Dueñas is walking those same streets leading a new protest but this time as a teacher. She is one of the thousands of teachers striking on behalf of the United Teachers of Los Angeles (UTLA) as they seek higher pay and better classroom conditions. She has also quickly become the face of the LA teachers strike as her image has been seen on posters, billboards, and classroom walls across Southern California.

Roxana Dueñas is steadfast and determined in the LA Teachers Strike poster urging people to “Stand With LA Teachers!”

CREDIT: Credit: UTLA

Dueñas, 34, has taught history and ethnic studies at Roosevelt High School in Boyle Heights for the past nine years. Growing up in the neighborhood was a big reason she wanted to return and teach there after graduating from UCLA with her master’s in education. It was her time at UC Santa Barbara, however, where she learned about Chicano studies and how was she was devoid of the history that happened at her own high school.

“My high school experience was positive for the most part but when I took my first ethnic study class in college I learned that my high school was part of the Chicano walkouts,” Dueñas said. “They never taught us about it and it made me realize not everyone had the same experience as me growing up.”

That’s why she made it a mission to create a learning environment where students could learn about their culture. In 2014, her and two other teachers created an ethnic studies curriculum that taught students about the local Chicano history that happened in their neighborhood. Her colleagues and students acknowledge her commitment and passion for teaching, it’s also a big reason why she was chosen to be highlighted on a poster.

Ernesto Yereno, a local Boyle Heights artist, chose to highlight Dueñas because he knew what her image represents in the majority Latino school district.

CREDIT: Credit: Ernesto Yerena

Yerena, who has a studio in Boyle Heights, met Dueñas after realizing they had mutual friends and shared similar views. After the UTLA approached him about creating some work for their campaign, he knew Dueñas was the perfect embodiment of what the strike should be representing.

“Roxy is an awesome teacher and an even better person. A lot of the kids look up to her in the community,” Yerena said. “I knew what impact she would have so it was a no-doubter to have her as the face of the strike.”

The 32-year-old artist specializes in political art, particularly work that highlights Latino people and culture. He says that highlighting a person of color is important especially in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), where less than 11 percent of students are white and 66 percent of teachers are people of color.

“A lot of times people tell me they see themselves in my work and, as brown people, we never see someone like us so when they do its a big deal,” he said. “Representation matters especially a majority Latino area like this. Growing up all I had were white teachers so Roxy is a mirror image of who she is standing up for on the picket lines.”

Dueñas recalls two young girls asking to take a picture with her and having her one of her students show the poster as her lock-screen image. “To me it’s unbelievable and it empowering to see young girls look up to you. It makes me feel like we’re on the right side.”

Dueñas says she is humbled by the artwork and wants it to remind people of the importance of the changing demographics in this country.

CREDIT: CREDIT: Empan16/Twitter

When asked what it means to not only be the face of the strike but have it be a Latina, Dueñas said she hopes it’s the start of a shift in representation.

“I’m optimistic,” she says. “It means there’s a change in terms of the demographics of our teachers and the students they serve in their communities nationwide.”

She acknowledges that school is more than just a place to learn for many students in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). The majority of students are low-income as more than 80 percent of its students get free or reduced-price lunches. Parents use school as daycare, a place where their children get fed and foster relationships with teachers especially here in East LA.

“That’s the driving force behind our school site. They are more than just academic learning centers but a place where they foster relationships with teachers,” Dueñas said. “You can’t serve without observing the other. These things are interconnecting and our young people have a broad range of needs.”

The LA Teachers Strike has brought support from students and parents that Dueñas says reminds her of why she got into teaching in the first place.

CREDIT: Credit: Twitter/JosephBrusky

“It all has definitely been humbling and really its surreal to see my face everywhere,” Dueñas said. “I was pouring rain the first four days of the strike and we had parents and students come by to show their support, I can’t put that into words.”

Dueñas, whose father was a cook and had a stay-at-home mom who immigrated from Mexico, says she’s been approached by many parents thanking her for taking a stand for their children’s education. She understands the sentiment and the responsibility she has not only as a teacher but as a role model in the working class neighborhood she grew up in.

As union leaders and teachers reached an agreement after six days of picketing, Dueñas says addressing issues like smaller class sizes and hiring more support staff is more imperative than ever. She says the strike was bigger than just one demand but an attempt to transform a place of learning especially in communities of color like Boyle Heights.

“When I see my students for the first time after the strike ends, I want to tell them one thing,” Dueñas said. “I want them to see that organizing works and I hope more importantly they can see themselves making a difference in their own community.”


READ: As LA Teachers Go Into The Second Day Of Their Strike, A GoFundMe Campaign Is Bringing Tacos To The Picket Lines

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