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Latinos Need To Keep These 18 Scholarships In Mind When Applying To College And Grad School

You’ve probably heard about all of the rich and famous people facing serious legal consequences for bribing college officials to get their kids into top colleges. While most of us don’t have it like that, we need to fight even harder to take the spots we deserve in those universities. As you apply for colleges, don’t forget about these important scholarships to help you outdo anyone who paid for their place in college.

According to the Pew Research Center, there are fewer and fewer Latino students are going to college. In fact, despite how rapidly the Latino community is growing in the U.S., a widening education gap lands us at half as likely to hold a college degree as non-Latino white adults according to The Education Trust. Why?

Hechinger reports that immigration is the likely factor that’s limiting Latinos.

CREDIT: @scholdotcom / Twitter

While U.S.-born Latinos are on par with non-Latino black Americans’ college attainment (about 30 percent), that drops to just 17 percent when we look at Latino adults born abroad. That gap is likely explained by documentation, which prevents students from qualifying for in-state tuition.

Here are a few scholarships that can make higher education more possible for Latinos.

1. The Hispanic Scholarship Fund

CREDIT: @hsfphotos / Twitter

You don’t have to be a high school student to apply. This scholarship is for graduate students as well, with a focus on STEM majors.

GPA Requirement: 3.0 (high school) and 2.5 (college)

Award: This merit-based scholarship ranges from $500 to $5,000 based on relative need.

2. ¡Adelante! Fund

CREDIT: @smcadelanteclub / Instagram

If you go to scholarships.com, you’ll find a variety of ¡Adelante! scholarships with a range of eligibility requirements. Some require attendance to Leadership Institutes, banquets and all require community service commitments.

GPA Requirement: 2.75

Award: $1,000-$3,000

3. Ann Seki Memorial Scholarship

CREDIT: @coneval_mx / Twitter

With Chevron as a sponsor, you can expect a big chunk of change. Named after the original member of its Hispanic recruiting team, Ann Seki, who worked for three decades to hire Latinxs and diverse employees, this is for you if you’re into almost any kind of engineering.

GPA Requirement: 3.3

Award: $500 to $10,000

4. Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Scholarships

CREDIT: @cxm1k / Twitter

The SHPE offers nine different scholarship opportunities for a variety of differently-aged students with an obvious focus in engineering.

GPA Requirement: 2.75

Award: $2,000-$5,000.

5. Anhelo Project Dream Scholarship Application

CREDIT: @bgcgreatersandiego / Instagram

The Anhelo Project is for Illinois students who are undocumented and don’t have to be registered under DACA. Since 2011, they’ve awarded over $100,000 to more than 50 recipients.

GPA Requirement: 2.50

6. AMS Minority Scholarships

CREDIT: @REMEZCLA / Twitter

This scholarship is for every underrepresented minority, with a specific interest in “atmospheric or related oceanic and hydrologic sciences.”

GPA Requirement: NONE

Award: $6,000 in two installments

7. The Randy Falco Scholarship

CREDIT: @TheEmmys / Twitter

Yep, this comes from the actual Academy, and this scholarship is meant for Latinos pursuing careers in journalism or television only.

Award: $10,000

8. ACS Scholars Program

CREDIT: @LULFOUNDATION / Twitter

This FAFSA-based scholarship is for any graduating high school senior or college student with a major in chemistry, biochemistry, chemical engineering, chemical technology, or another chemistry-related science.

GPA Requirement: 3.0

Award: $2,500-$5,000 depending on college grade level.

9. La Unidad Latina DREAM Scholarship

CREDIT: @LULFOUNDATION / Twitter

This scholarship es solamente por los Dreamers. That means you must be registered under DACA, and have already completed one year of undergrad.

GPA Requirement: 2.8

Grant: $500 to $3,000

10. Puerto Rican Relief Scholarship

CREDIT: @LULFoundation / Twitter

The LUL Foundation has also created a scholarship for those Boricuas enrolled on the island. It should help those who have been displaced or affected by Hurricane Maria.

Check out www.lulf.org for more info.

11. Haz La U Program

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Colgate Palm Olive. 21 January 2019.

The Hispanic Heritage Foundation partnered with monopoly Colgate-Palmolive to offer 31 scholarships ranging from $2,000 to $15,000 for Hispanic youth.

GPA Requirement: 3.0

12. National Association of Hispanic Journalists

CREDIT: officialnahj / Instagram

NAHJ describes its scholarship opportunities as “open to college-bound high school seniors, college undergraduates, and graduate students pursuing careers in English or Spanish-language print, broadcast, digital, or photojournalism.”

GPA Requirement:

Award: $1,500 to $5,000

13. Liberty Power Bright Horizons Scholarship

CREDIT: Untitled. Digital Image. Liberty Power Corp. 21 January 2019.

Did you know that Liberty Power is Latino-owned? That’s why it’s offering major scholarships to any student majoring in STEM programs, who are interested in energy and the environment.

GPA Requirement:

Awards: $4,000 to $10,000

14. Actuarial Diversity Scholarship

CREDIT: @ebalexan / Twitter

This scholarship isn’t just for Black, Latino, Pacific Islander and Indigenous Peoples’ who are into books. They want to become actuaries, one of the highest paying accounting professions.

GPA Requirement: 3.0

Award: $1,000-$4,000

15. NBC Universal/LNESC Scholarship

CREDIT: @NBC / Instagram

If you’re already a sophomore or junior college student with an interest in media and entertainment, then you might be eligible!

GPA Requirement: 3.0

Award: $5,000 for ten winners

16. The Carlos M. Casteñeda Journalism Scholarship

CREDIT: @alocuba / Instagram

This scholarship is for Spanish-speaking college graduates looking to get a Masters in journalism. We need you to apply and get out there.

GPA Requirement: 3.0

Award: $7,000

17. CUNY Becas Scholarship Program

CREDIT: @ieltscoach911 / Twitter

The City University of New York Jaime Lucero Mexican Studies Institute offers scholarships to its students who are registered DACA recipients. You have to be committed to serving the Mexican community. Facil, no?

GPA Requirement: NONE

Award: $6,730

18. MALDEF Law School Scholarship Program

CREDIT: @meformagrupo / Instagram

If you’re here for the long civil rights overhaul for Latino-Americans, keep your eyes on this prize. The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund is offering 15 awards of $5,000 to Latinos in law school who are committed to advancing Latino civil rights as a career.

Plus, so many more!

CREDIT: @van_hyundai / Twitter

It’s easy to find the dozens of scholarships that are geared towards Latinos an other minorities, and every step you take toward closing the education gap for Latinos can only help other Latinos (namely, you to start with). Have you benefitted from one of these scholarships? Share this article and encourage your friends to dream big!


READ: College Is An Incredible Experience If You Do It Right. Here Are 21 Tips To Make The Most Of It

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A Judge Has Ruled That The University of California System Can No Longer Use SAT And ACT Tests For Admissions And It’s A Huge Win For The Underprivileged

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A Judge Has Ruled That The University of California System Can No Longer Use SAT And ACT Tests For Admissions And It’s A Huge Win For The Underprivileged

Kevork Djansezian / Getty

Advocates against the use of standardized tests for college admissions have long argued that the use of such exams sets back students from underprivileged backgrounds and those who have disabilities. Aware of the leg up it gives to privileged and non-disabled students an advantage in the admittance process, they’ve rallied for schools to end such practices.

And it looks like they’ve just won their argument.

A judge has ruled that the University of California system can no longer use ACT and SAT tests as part of their admissions process.

Brad Seligman is the Alameda County Superior Court Judge who issued the preliminary injunction in the case of Kawika Smith v. Regents of the University of California on Tuesday. The plaintiffs in Kawika Smith v. Regents of the University of California include five students and six organizations College Access Plan, Little Manila Rising, Dolores Huerta Foundation, College Seekers, Chinese for Affirmative Action, and Community Coalition.

In his decision, Judge Seligman underlined that the UC system’s “test-optional” policy on UC campuses has long given privileged and non-disabled students a chance at a “second look” in the admissions process. According to Seligman, this “second look” denies such opportunities to students who are unable to access the tests.

The decision is a major victory for students with disabilities and from underprivileged backgrounds.

News of the decision comes on the heels of the university system’s ruling to waive the standardized testing requirements until 2024.

In May, a news release asserted that if a new form of a standardized test had not been developed by 2025, the system would have to put an end to the testing requirement for California students. On Monday, the judge’s ruling took things further by banning the consideration of scores from students who submit them all together.

“The current COVID 19 pandemic has resulted in restrictions in the availability of test sites,” Seligman wrote in his ruling. “While test-taking opportunities for all students have been limited, for persons with disabilities, the ability to obtain accommodations or even to locate suitable test locations for the test is ‘almost nil.'”

A spokesperson for the University of California said the university “respectfully disagrees with the Court’s ruling.”

“An injunction may interfere with the University’s efforts to implement an appropriate and comprehensive admissions policies and its ability to attract and enroll students of diverse backgrounds and experiences,” the spokesperson said. According to the spokesperson, the UC system is considering further legal action in the case. The system said that its testing has allowed for an increase in admission of low-income and first-generation-to-college-students for the fall of 2020.

With UC being the largest university system in the country, Seligman’s ruling is a massive deal. Students and advocates have long fought for the elimination of these standardized tests arguing that they do not accurately reflect a student’s academic ability.

“Research has repeatedly proved that students from wealthy families score higher on the SAT and ACT, compared to students from low-income families,” reports CNN. It’s important to note that the analysis by Inside Higher Ed revealed that the “lowest average scores for each part of the SAT came from students with less than $20,000 in family income. The highest scores came from those with more than $200,000 in family income.”

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For The First Time In History, Latinos Make Up The Largest Group Of University Of California System’s Freshman Class— It’s Not Enough

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For The First Time In History, Latinos Make Up The Largest Group Of University Of California System’s Freshman Class— It’s Not Enough

Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Updated August 13, 2020.

For the first time, Latinos make up a majority of students accepted into the University of California system. California is home to a very large Latino population and these incoming freshman class is being celebrated as representing California.

For the first time in its history, the University of California system admitted a class of majority Latino students.

According to data about admissions, Latinos represent 36 percent of the 79,953 students accepted to the UC system. Asian-Americans represent 35 percent of the new freshman class. Meanwhile, white people made up 21 percent, African-Americans made up 5 percent, and American Indian/Pacific Islander made up 0 percent. Three percent of students chose not to reveal their race or ethnicity.

Audrey Dow, senior vice president of the policy and advocacy organization Campaign for College Opportunity, spoke to The New York Times about the progress and said that while these shifts are momentous, they’re not enough. “But 36 percent of admits is far under proportional representation,” she told NYT in an email. According to the paper, proportional representation would be much closer to having 50 percent of students be Latino considering that more than half of high school graduates in California are Latino.

“This has been an incredibly challenging time as many students have been making their college decision in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic,” UC President Janet Napolitano said in a statement. “UC continues to see increased admissions of underrepresented students as we seek to educate a diverse student body of future leaders. The incoming class will be one of our most talented and diverse yet, and UC is proud to invite them to join us.”

The university system recently did away with SAT/ACT requirements.

Some think that the university system eliminating the SAT/ACT requirements explains part of the uptick in Latino students. In May, the UC system announced that students would not be required to submit SAT or ACT scores for admission.

The standardized tests have long been accused of preventing minority and disadvantaged students from attending college.

The Compton Unified School District filed a lawsuit against the UC system in late 2019. The lawsuit, filed by four students and six community organizers, points out the racial bias of the tests that block disadvantaged and minority students from being admitted to college.

READ: In-Person Courses Have Been Canceled As Well As Recreational Activities, Now Students Are Protesting To Cancel SAT Exams Due To Coronavirus

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