Things That Matter

‘El Chapo’ Guzman Wants To Give His Giant Drug Fortune To Indigenous Mexicans

Convicted Mexican cartel leader Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman wants his drug fortune to be redistributed amongst Mexico’s indigenous people. Mexico’s President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador agrees. El Chapo forfeited $12.7 billion to the United States following his 10-count indictment and conviction of racketeering and drug trafficking crimes. 

You can’t really argue with President Lopez Obrador or El Chapo on this front. That money was made and harvested in Mexico, and presumably many Mexican citizens were exploited and harmed in the process. If the money is being confiscated, it isn’t unreasonable that El Chapo pays back those damages to the people he hurt. Nor is it so farfetched that the money is redistributed for the betterment of Mexican citizens. Moreover, wouldn’t it be nice to see how angry it makes President Trumpito? Puts a smile on your face, doesn’t it? 

Could $12.7 billion really be given to Indigenous Mexicans? 

In July this summer, US authorities acquired a court order that forced El Chapo to forfeit $12.7 billion earned as a drug lord. However, the 62-year-old has never admitted to earning billions of dollars (for the obvious legal reasons). Moreover, it is merely a calculated estimate based on average drug prices. However, the United States believes the sum is roughly the amount the Sinola Cartel leader earned from trafficking cocaine, marijuana, and heroin. 

“This is largely an academic exercise as the government has never located or identified a penny of this $12.7 billion in proceeds supposedly generated by Mr. Guzman,” said Jeffrey Lichtman, a lawyer for Guzman.

Nevertheless, his lawyer Jose Gonzalez Meza says if that money exists, El Chapo has thoughts. 

“He says, well, if that money exists … that money does not belong to the United States; it belongs to Mexico,” Gonzalez Meza told Reuters. “And he asks for President Lopez Obrador to allocate (the money) to the indigenous communities.”

El Chapo began floating the idea from the Colorado maximum-security prison he is held in to his mother and sisters in August, according to the lawyer.

Who is El Chapo? 

Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzmán is thought to have been the most powerful drug trafficker in the world. A Mexican drug lord of the Sinaloa Cartel, El Chapo was first captured in Guatemala and extradited to Mexico in 1993. Following a 20-year prison sentence for murder and trafficking, El Chapo was able to bribe prison guards and escape in 2001. 

For over a decade he was a fugitive until being recaptured again in 2014. In 2015, he escaped once again through a tunnel in his jail cell. Following a shoot out in 2016, Mexican authorities were able to extradite him to the United States where he had indictments in over seven U.S. federal courts. It wasn’t until 2019, that El Chapo was found guilty on at least 10 charges including homicide, money laundering, and drug trafficking with intent to distribute. El Chapo was sentenced to life in prison plus 30 years and was ordered to forfeit more than $12.7 billion. 

A different kind of “Robin Hood.”

Earlier this year, President Lopez Obrador launched the creation of a Robin Hood-like institute that would redistribute nefarious-gotten wealth back to Mexican citizens. He supported El Chapo’s idea. 

“I liked the declaration. I don’t know if it’s true. I can’t verify it, but if it’s as it came out in the media, that a lawyer says Guzman wants his wealth to be given to Mexico’s indigenous communities, I think it’s good,” he said.

The President simply wants any Mexican criminal forfeitures to help the people who were most hurt by them. He said the Mexican government would take “all necessary legal actions” to ensure this would happen. 

“Also, we have started a process because we want everything that’s confiscated in the United States from criminals or suspected criminals from Mexico is returned to Mexico,” he added.

Hope for indigenous Mexicans.

In the 1970s, President Lopez Obrador worked with indigenous communities in Tabasco. Mexico’s indigenous population continues to be the most marginalized in the country and Lopez Obrador has vowed to improve conditions for them. 

According to a census conducted by the National Council for Evaluation of Social Development Policy, 71.9% of Mexico’s indigenous population lived in extreme poverty in 2016. Around 71.3% of indigenous people reported earning minimum wage or less, while 19.8% of indigenous people between ages 30 and 64 could not read or write. These disparities are largely attributed to the inaccessibility of food, social welfare, and basic shelter services. 

While El Chapo’s fortune and how much of it the United States actually has, remains somewhat of a mystery, we know there is at least some money. This man wouldn’t be considered the most powerful drug lord in the world otherwise. Using that money to enrich Mexican citizens feels a lot more like justice than letting the wealthiest nation in the world keep it to do what… pay for a border wall most people don’t want? 

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This Iñupiaq TikToker Has A Thing Or Two To Teach You About Celebrating Indigenous Cultures Online

Fierce

This Iñupiaq TikToker Has A Thing Or Two To Teach You About Celebrating Indigenous Cultures Online

Drew Angerer / Getty

An Indigenous woman from Utqiagvik, Alaska who is part of the Iñupiaq tribe is TikTok’s latest culture sensation.

While the rest of us are stuck indoors and quarantining, Patuk Glenn has been amassing a following on Instagram and teaching her 81,000 followers about the Iñupiaq culture, traditions, and daily routines. From sharing videos about hunting to showing off her culture’s traditional clothing, Glenn’s videos are a reminder that beyond being alive, indigenous cultures around the globe are resilient– even in the face of our world’s constant attempts to change and eliminate them.

Glenn’s trending TikTok videos run the gamut from cooking to wearing her traditional clothing.

In some videos, Glenn shares the recipe for Inuit ice cream (caribou fat, ground caribou meat, and seal meat) or shares what her traditional clothing looks like. In one truly insightful clip, she takes her followers through a traditional ice cellar in her mother’s house. There, Glenn shared with her viewers that she and her family use the permafrost surround the cellar to preserve whale, seal, and caribou.

Given some of the food content, some of Glenn’s videos have received some backlash to which she isn’t batting much of an eye.

In videos where Glenn features food from whales (muktuk, or whale skin) she says that she has become used to receiving not so positive comments on occasion. Speaking to CBC News, Glenn explained that such comments are hurtful at times but mostly only inspire to continue to educate her followers more. “At first I was really upset,” she explained. “From there, with all of the negative backlash, I felt like it was my responsibility to help educate on why our Inuit people in the Arctic are hunters and gatherers.”

Glenn says that negative comments only push her to share more and educate her followers, particularly because she would like her daughter to be able to share her love for her culture one day as well. “We don’t want our kids to feel ashamed of who they are and where they came from. That’s what really hurt me the most.”

Impressively, Glenn says that learning on TikTok has become a two-way street too.

From TikTok, Glenn says that she has been able to learn and educate herself more about other Indigenous cultures as well. Glenn’s growing understanding of these groups and tribes (like Navajo and Cree) are a welcome surprise. Particularly for someone who, like the rest of us, is taught very little about the world’s Indigenous populations. “In the United States, we’re largely left out of the media. There’s no representation of us,” Glenn shared. “It’s 2020, we have a real opportunity in this day and age to be able to educate the world where institutional education has failed, or where mainstream media has failed.”

For Glenn, her fight to teach others more about her culture is vital. “This platform is helping give the power back into Indigenous people’s hands, to speak on behalf of themselves. I think that’s the really cool piece of it.”

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Photographer Diego Huerta Took An Update Photo Of The Most Beautiful Girl In Mexico

Culture

Photographer Diego Huerta Took An Update Photo Of The Most Beautiful Girl In Mexico

diegohuertaphoto / Instagram

Diego Huerta is a photographer who has used his talents and time to document indigenous communities to preserve the culture and history. One of Huerta’s most famous photos was one of a young girl that he called the most beautiful girl in Mexico. He recently shared a new photo of the girl as a woman.

Diego Huerta shared an updated photo of the most beautiful girl woman in Mexico.

Huerta first met the girl when he was traveling through Mexico years ago. The first photo, posted in 2016 but taken in 2011, highlighted the young woman that he dubbed the most beautiful girl in Mexico. The latest photo shows the girl grown up and still living in her same pueblo in 2017. She is still a stunning reminder of the beauty that exists in southern Mexico.

The woman lives in Chiapas, the last Mexican state before entering Central America by way of Guatemala. There are multiple indigenous communities in Chiapas. While Huerta does not mention the indigenous community the woman belongs to, the clothing appears to represent the Zoque people.

The woman is still creating wander and interest among Huerta’s fans.

Credit: diegohuertaphoto / Instagram

Her quiet and still composure makes her seem like a Mexican Mona Lisa, tbh. Her stoic face in the photographs has captivated Huerta fans for years. The first photo of the young woman was seen around the world and her beauty was celebrated by everyone who saw the photo.

The young girl’s eyes are what drew in the love and praise from people around the world.

Huerta made it a point to call out the young girl’s eyes in the photo. It isn’t because of the color of her eyes. He was intrigued by her eyes because she is deaf and her eyes are one of the ways she is able to communicate with the world around her.

“In my journey through South Mexico, in a town located in the middle of the Chiapas’ mountains I found the most brilliant eyes that I have ever seen,” Huerta wrote in the original post. “The beauty of this girl was similar to the panoramic views I was able to appreciate every time I turned around. She´s deaf, the way to communicate with her was by signs. It is no mystery that the beauty of the true Mexican woman is way above all beauty contests.”

People are obsessing over her beauty that seems to improve with age.

Credit: diegohuertaphoto / Instagram

Nine years makes a big difference in a young person’s development. It can be the difference between 11 and 20, which is a huge difference. Her silent beauty is proof that indigenous communities hold some of the most beautiful people in the world. There is no reason to praise and adhere to Euro-centric beauty standards.

The Instagram posted is filled with messages of appreciation celebrating the photo and the young woman we saw grow up.

Credit: diegohuertaphoto / Instagram

Huerta currently has a documentary about the Tehuana people in Oaxaca. His photographs and film collection highlighting and exalting the indigenous community of Mexico is beautiful and necessary. He is collecting an important and vibrant part of human history by giving the first people to inhabit the land a chance to shine and show who Mexico truly is.

READ: Photographer Diego Huerta Is Giving Everyone A Look Into The Tehuana Culture In Oaxaca, Mexico

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