Things That Matter

Here’s Where You Can Donate To Those Affected By The Earthquakes In Mexico And Hurricanes In Puerto Rico

After the recent earthquakes in Mexico and hurricanes in Puerto Rico, it can be heartbreaking to see, from afar, all the devastation people in affected areas are currently enduring. While we might be at a loss about how to help our family and friends in Latin America during these trying times, there are ways to help. Here’s a list of charities, fundraising campaigns and other organizations helping those affected in Mexico and Puerto Rico.

Topos Mexico

Topos Mexico are essentially first responders during major earthquakes in Mexico. They were pulling people out of the rubble of collapsed buildings minutes after yesterday’s earthquake. The organization was established in 1985 after the historic 8.1 earthquake that hit Mexico City that same year.

PayPal donations can be made to: donativos@brigada-rescate-topos.org

The Maria Fund

The Center for Popular Democracy is a pro-worker, pro-immigrant organization that has set up the Maria Fund. All proceeds “will be used to support immediate relief, recovery and equitable rebuilding in Puerto Rico for low-income communities of color hit hardest by the storm.”

Click here to donate.

UNICEF Mexico

Actress and activist Salma Hayek is partnering with UNICEF Mexico by contributing $100,000. She’s launching her own fundraiser through Crowdrise along with UNICEF.

Click here to donate.

ConPRmetidos

ConPRmetidos, a nonprofit located in Puerto Rico, launched an Indiegogo page for Hurricane Irma. This money will also go toward the recovery process in the wake of Hurricane Maria.

Click here to help.

YouCaring: #YoXMéxico

Mexican fútbol pros Miguel Layún and Javier “Chicharito” Hernandez are lending their name to raise money for those affected by Mexico’s magnitude 7.1 earthquake.

“To be so far away from México and witness so much suffering is very hurtful,” Hernandez says in the video. “And we know that many see us a source of inspiration, but in this case, what has really inspired us is to see millions of Mexicans in the street help each other, without asking for anything in return.”

Click here to support.

Unidos Por Puerto Rico

Puerto Rican First Lady Beatriz Rosselló launched Unidos Por Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Irma and is now helping in the recovery process. There will be a telethon on October 1 to benefit victims of the hurricanes.

MORE:

UNICEF: UNICEF has long been an organization that helps to protect and support children all over the world, especially in times of crisis and disaster.

Puerto Rico Relief

Red Cross: The Red Cross provides supplies and shelter to those in need after a natural disaster.

Puerto Rico Relief and Mexico Relief

GlobalGiving: GlobalGiving has helped raise more than $270 million since 2002 and vets all donation drives to ensure that they are legitimate and work for the cause they claim.

Puerto Rico Relief and Mexico Relief

Project Paz: Project Paz has a donation page set up where you can donate to help victims of either the Sept. 7 Oaxaca/Chiapas earthquake or the Sept. 19 Mexico City earthquake.

READ: Buildings Collapse And More Than 70 Dead After Mexico City Is Hit By Major Earthquake

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A Feminist Flash Mob In Chile Went Viral And Has Sparked A Worldwide Movement Against Violence Towards Women

Things That Matter

A Feminist Flash Mob In Chile Went Viral And Has Sparked A Worldwide Movement Against Violence Towards Women

Beto Rosales / El Voz

“El violador eres tú” has become a powerful cry of protest for women around the world. Last week, what started as a heartfelt and chilling, but isolated, performance during a protest against gender-based violence in Chile, became a global sensation. Several clips featuring tens of women chanting “A Rapist In Your Way” went viral, and it’s sparked impassioned protests all around the world.

On the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, dozens gathered outside the supreme court building of Santiago, Chile for a feminist flash mob.

https://www.instagram.com/p/B5TzGYlFqen/

Organized by a local feminist collective, the performance was titled “Un violador en tu camino” (“A rapist in your way”). The song and accompanying dance takes on the patriarchy as the cause both of violence against women and the victim shaming that often comes after. “Y la culpa no era mía, ni dónde estaba, ni cómo vestía,” they sang (“and the fault wasn’t mine, not where I was, not how I dressed”).

The chant addressed the failure of the justice system to protect women.

The lyrics of the chant quote a verse of the Chilean police anthem, “Sleep calmly, innocent girl, without worrying about the bandit. For over your smiling, sweet dreams, watches your loving cop.”

Las Tesis is the Chilean group that organized the flashmob.

The group, Las Tesis, organized the performance which was inspired by the work of renowned Latin American feminist and professor Rita Laura Segato. Her thinking, the group said, moved them to create a flash mob that would show rape not just as a crime against an individual woman, but the expression of a larger social issue.

The protest struck a chord for thousands of women around the world, clips of the Chilean protest went viral in just a matter of hours.

The protest has since spread outside of Chile. In Mexico City, a square full of women of all ages joined a similar flash mob on Nov. 29.

Public performances of the song have also been held in other cities, including Bogotá, Madrid, Barcelona, London, and Paris.

In Spain, the ‘intervention’ as the group calls it, was held in front of the Arc de Triomphe in Barcelona and at the Plaza de Reina Sofia in Madrid.

In Paris, feminists chanted in their native French.

A French feminist collective chanted “Le violeur c’est toi,” in front of the Eiffel Tower. “As feminists in Paris we are responding to the call made by #LasTesis from Chile to raise our voice against femicides and rape!” tweeted a representative of the collective, “The rapist is you, the police, the justice system, the state, the society!” they chanted.

English and Chilean women joined in on the global protest in the UK.

In the UK, women staged an intervention in Bristol as well as in London. A group of Chilean women gathered outside the Chilean Embassy in London to join the protest against sexual violence towards women.

‘A Rapist In Your Way’ was also performed in Berlin.

More women rallied in the German capital to stage another intervention of what has quickly turned into a global protest.

The powerful performance has become an anthem for women everywhere.

‘A Rapist In Your Way’ has sparked a powerful movement of people who simply ask for respect, for justice and equality, for an end to impunity. What was originally just a one-day event to protest locally, has evolved into a worldwide movement and has made women acutely aware of their power, but also of the commonalities of the injustices they all suffer —no matter their geographic location.

“I’m fighting for myself, for my generation of young people and for the generation of my daughter,” Belifet Antones, who participated in the intervention performance of Mexico City with her two-year-old daughter, told the newspaper El Universal. “I believe that women carrying out these kinds of protests can achieve something better for us women… I don’t want to leave this violent Mexico to my daughter… I don’t want anybody to murder her, to rape her,” she said.

Mexico is the most dangerous country for women in the world.

Ten women are killed on average every day in Mexico, making the country one of the most dangerous for females in the world. Acknowledging the protest, Mexico City’s Mayor Claudia Sheinbaum reiterated her government’s commitment to do everything possible to ensure that the capital is a safe city for women. Just last week, the mayor issued a gender alert for Mexico City, activating a range of measures to address violence against women, after much pressure from several marches and protests that took place this 2019.

Mexico City Has Been Chosen To Host The First Ever Spotify Music Awards And We Can’t Wait

Entertainment

Mexico City Has Been Chosen To Host The First Ever Spotify Music Awards And We Can’t Wait

Spotify

A lot of people in Mexico City use Spotify which is why it made sense for the company to launch their new annual awards show there. The inaugural event will take place on March 5, 2020. Unlike other music award shows, where a select group of members decides the winners, the platform will allow fans to dictate the victors using streaming data — and it appears to be centered around Mexico and Latin America. 

Having the awards show obviously will encourage users to stream their favorite artists more often but launching the show in Mexico City will cement the brand as one that can recognize the importance of musical audiences outside of the United States. The Spotify Awards will be aired live on TNT and will be aimed at Spanish-speakers in Latin America. 

Mexico City is a Spotify City.

Spotify released a video to promote the award show and it is entirely in Spanish and filmed in Mexico. 

“A multicultural mecca of nearly 22 million residents, the greater Mexico City metropolitan area is more populous than both the greater Los Angeles and greater New York City areas, respectively,” the streaming service declared.

According to Variety, Mexico City has the highest concentration of users in the world, more than any other city including New York, Paris, Chile, Santiago, and London. In 2018, Spotify declared the city the “streaming music capital” just five years after launching the service in Mexico. 

“Mexico City has evolved in a few short years from being Spotify’s first-ever Latin American market, in 2013, to our largest listener base worldwide today. Since we launched in Mexico City, Spotify has opened international artists’ eyes to this global music epicenter as a place to expand their reach and connect with new audiences,” Spotify said 2018. 

Artists appear to be flocking to Mexico City because they know they have a solid fanbase there.

The brand seems certain that Mexico City a trendsetting cultural mecca. It noted that the diverse population and their tastes made the city an epicenter for both established and new artists. The company noted the headliners for the 2018 Corona Capital music festival, like Imagine Dragons, Robbie Williams, and Nine Inch Nails, had their music streamed the most in Mexico City. 

The devotion of chilangos, seems to be pulling in aspiring artists to the city to broaden their audience. 

“We’re seeing a wave of touring artists, like genre-bending singer-songwriter Mon Laferte from Chile and alt-rock band Diamante Eléctrico from Colombia, flock to Mexico City to connect with fans and make their mark,” Spotify said. 

Users don’t just decide the awards, they decide the categories.

Spotify has 248 million users worldwide, and the fate of their inaugural award show depends on them. At the Spotify Awards, user-generated data will determine the finalists, winners and the categories. 

“Thanks to streaming and the true audience size of Mexico, users are in the front seat like never before. We decided to celebrate this by recognizing what users love based entirely on their listening. The Spotify Awards is all about this, giving everyone an opportunity to be part of the show,“ Mia Nygren, Spotify’s Managing Director for Latin America, said in a statement. 

It will be interesting to see how this all plays out considering Latinx artists have been dominating streaming services for the last few years and Spotify included some of those genres in their press release. 

“That’s right: your streaming choices — whether hip-hop or rock, reggaeton, band, or cumbia — matter,” they wrote.  “Your plays, patterns, and habits will help determine the award categories, finalists, and winners, for the Spotify Awards by providing a true reflection of what fans are listening to.”

This could mean far more interesting categories that just “Best Rock” or “Best Rap” — Latinx streamers could possibly be establishing more diverse awards categories like “Best Reggaeton” or “Best Cumbia,” with their listening habits alone. Moreover, the show is airing in Spanish which has to mean that the Spotify Awards are going to look a whole lot different than the 2020 Grammy Awards, and perhaps even the 2019 Latin Grammy Awards, where many reggaeton artists felt snubbed. We’ll just have to find out on March 5.